Why I think Peru is one of the best countries to live

Answers to your qestions about moving to and living in Peru,

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Why I think Peru is one of the best countries to live

Postby mrsteak » Wed Jan 10, 2018 6:13 pm

This thread is meant as a counterweight to the famous "Why I think Peru is one of the worst countries to live" thread.

Please type your arguments here:


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Re: Why I think Peru is one of the best countries to live

Postby eugene.in.peru » Thu Jan 11, 2018 11:08 am

ceviche
mangos
machu pichu
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Re: Why I think Peru is one of the best countries to live

Postby Formidable 1 » Thu Jan 11, 2018 12:47 pm

Outstanding customer service.
Great doctors & dentists.
World class food.
Democratic prices.
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Re: Why I think Peru is one of the best countries to live

Postby mrsteak » Thu Jan 11, 2018 1:45 pm

So far the arguments are thin....

you can have great food anywhere in the world. Same for doctors. ANYTHING specific to Peru? e.g. "I have xxx only in Peru" :?:
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Re: Why I think Peru is one of the best countries to live

Postby eugene.in.peru » Thu Jan 11, 2018 3:26 pm

mrsteak wrote:So far the arguments are thin....

you can have great food anywhere in the world. Same for doctors. ANYTHING specific to Peru? e.g. "I have xxx only in Peru" :?:


xxx stands for sex?
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Re: Why I think Peru is one of the best countries to live

Postby Alpineprince » Thu Jan 11, 2018 3:41 pm

My young beautiful Peruvian Wife and my 2 and 12 y/o Peruvian-American sons, My Penthouse on the Malecon in Miraflores, my extended Peruvian family, all the experiences the past 15 years I would have missed. Feeling at home as a stranger in a strange land, People calling me Doctor or Maestro (I am neither). Having so many people greet me with a smile in stores,restaurants and on the street. Having the opportunity every day to make someone's life a little bit better.Seeing all the progress that has been made over these years. Too many things to list!
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Re: Why I think Peru is one of the best countries to live

Postby eugene.in.peru » Thu Jan 11, 2018 4:09 pm

Alpineprince wrote:People calling me Doctor or Maestro (I am neither).
Neither are many of the "medical" "doctors" here. :idea:
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Re: Why I think Peru is one of the best countries to live

Postby mrsteak » Thu Jan 11, 2018 7:26 pm

Alpineprince wrote:My young beautiful Peruvian Wife and my 2 and 12 y/o Peruvian-American sons, My Penthouse on the Malecon in Miraflores, my extended Peruvian family, all the experiences the past 15 years I would have missed. Feeling at home as a stranger in a strange land, People calling me Doctor or Maestro (I am neither). Having so many people greet me with a smile in stores,restaurants and on the street. Having the opportunity every day to make someone's life a little bit better.Seeing all the progress that has been made over these years. Too many things to list!


This is again not Peru specific and very personal - maybe except of the people greeting you with a smile, however this is same around all Asia, Caribbean, and more.

Again, so far the arguments are still very thin.

I was asking about arguments specific to Peru, that also apply to anyone who wants to come here. You can hardly argue with _your_ family LOL. Anything to tell a random person wanting to come to Peru and having no clue about the country WHY he/she SHOULD come to Peru? Only the smiling staff in restaurants? :? You also forget that frequently in Peru they just smile at your pocket :mrgreen:

In Austria when you have a magister or even better a doctor grade, they will be very servile with you. Like you are the boss LOL. But is this an argument to live in Austria?! Come on.
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Re: Why I think Peru is one of the best countries to live

Postby formerexpat » Sat Jan 13, 2018 1:27 am

I lived in Lima for five years and there are no objective qualities about Lima or Peru that make it the best or even one of the best places to live.

Those who find it's the place for them have a specific connection, eg partner/spouse, personal desire for adventure/getting outside of comfort zone, etc etc.

As the "infamous" other thread shows, there are a lot of reasons why it's one of the worst places to live, which are consistent with my experience (most specific to Lima but I did my share of traveling too, and other towns have the same or other drawbacks): it's hella loud; the ground, air and water are polluted; it smells (Lima, in many places with heaps of trash), the schools are among the worst in the world unless you have tons of money, in which case you pay outlandish amounts for the education quality of an *average* public school in the US (I taught in them, they're meh); street harassment is rampant and a daily occurrence for females (notice I didn't say women, the pigs know no limits with children); it's dangerous and always getting worse, even in the nice expensive areas; if you have enough money to live in a bubble you still have to see/interact with the smelly, trash-ridden, dangerous, dirty, noisy, uneducated (in the Peruvian sense of the term, not the english-language sense) aspects of reality there. Or you can live in the middle of nowhere, but you'd better be kid-free, adventurous and willing to rough it (going back to the personal reasons why someone would chose Peru and not immediately regret their decision.)

Sure, the food is good. My half-Peruvian daughter and I enjoyed some amazing lomo saltado at Gaston Acurio's restaurant in San Francisco a few weeks ago. And while relishing the nostalgia for my favorite peruvian dish, I also gave thanks that we have none of the stress and difficulty of living there anymore, that my daughter will get a solid education (for free!), have a solid chance at life, and that she can ride her bike with her friends in the street without me worrying, that I can walk her to school every morning without seeing a single piece of litter in the street or hearing a single blaring car horn. That's priceless. The fact that she's not watching me get catcalled every day is a bonus, and that she won't have to experience that bullsh*t either. I'm also happy to not have to punch walls anymore after refraining from punching catcallers all day. :roll:
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Re: Why I think Peru is one of the best countries to live

Postby formerexpat » Sat Jan 13, 2018 1:43 am

To the Doctor / Maestro comment -- my ex ( a Peruvian) got that too. And he was an unemployed freelance illustrator without a college degree. I heard it when I would be walking in the street with him. The deference, he thought it was ridiculous (and it was). When I walked alone I got followed, catcalled, propositioned, and that horrid kissing noise. This is not at all a reason to like the place. It IS a reason to find people's willingness to suck up a pathetic farce.
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Re: Why I think Peru is one of the best countries to live

Postby toughrider » Sat Jan 13, 2018 7:59 pm

formerexpat wrote:The deference, he thought it was ridiculous (and it was). When I walked alone I got followed, catcalled, propositioned, and that horrid kissing noise. This is not at all a reason to like the place. It IS a reason to find people's willingness to suck up a pathetic farce.


No wonder that in many countries around the world, women prefer to wear a BURKA to avoid that kind of hassle. In Europe, more and more women started wearing burka's in the last decade and their number is growing.
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Re: Why I think Peru is one of the best countries to live

Postby Alan » Sat Jan 13, 2018 8:40 pm

In no particular order:

I really enjoy the chance to see live traditional music and dance here. Everything from a tiny neighborhood peña with musica criolla, to small jazz clubs, to larger shows with andean music or salsa shows. The dancing culture is great, too... Marinera, musica negra, watching old folks dancing waltz criolla in the parks.. and dancing with my wife and friends at weddings and parties.

Peru has some great hiking, if you enjoy that kind of thing, and sightseeing in the Amazon is pretty spectacular,too.. not to mention all the other touristic opportunity that are relatively close and inexpensive. Pre-inca, Inca, colonial, republican... wow..

Then there is the fantastic variety of locally grown exotic fruits, fresh vegetables and andean grains..

All the energy - and chaos - of a country where the average age is only 25...

Is this the "best country" to live... of course not, but I wish all the nay-sayers could have seen Peru in the early 90's in order to appreciate how much things have improved.. and will continue to improve if only the country could get a grip on corruption and strengthen it's institutionality.
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Re: Why I think Peru is one of the best countries to live

Postby jumpinjack » Sun Jan 14, 2018 10:43 am

toughrider wrote:
formerexpat wrote:The deference, he thought it was ridiculous (and it was). When I walked alone I got followed, catcalled, propositioned, and that horrid kissing noise. This is not at all a reason to like the place. It IS a reason to find people's willingness to suck up a pathetic farce.


No wonder that in many countries around the world, women prefer to wear a BURKA to avoid that kind of hassle. In Europe, more and more women started wearing burka's in the last decade and their number is growing.

Silly me I thought all those burkas were worn by women fleeing s### hole countries.
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Re: Why I think Peru is one of the best countries to live

Postby SilverbackPeru » Mon Jan 15, 2018 11:31 am

Alan wrote:In no particular order:

I really enjoy the chance to see live traditional music and dance here. Everything from a tiny neighborhood peña with musica criolla, to small jazz clubs, to larger shows with andean music or salsa shows. The dancing culture is great, too... Marinera, musica negra, watching old folks dancing waltz criolla in the parks.. and dancing with my wife and friends at weddings and parties.

Peru has some great hiking, if you enjoy that kind of thing, and sightseeing in the Amazon is pretty spectacular,too.. not to mention all the other touristic opportunity that are relatively close and inexpensive. Pre-inca, Inca, colonial, republican... wow..

Then there is the fantastic variety of locally grown exotic fruits, fresh vegetables and andean grains..

All the energy - and chaos - of a country where the average age is only 25...

Is this the "best country" to live... of course not, but I wish all the nay-sayers could have seen Peru in the early 90's in order to appreciate how much things have improved.. and will continue to improve if only the country could get a grip on corruption and strengthen it's institutionality.


I'm not Lima's biggest fan but there is a few on Alan's list I would agree makes Peru good. I do like how you can go to a variety of different types of bars in Miraflores. There's Jazz clubs, Brazilian or Columbian bars as well as some nice cliff top restaurants and other places that over a view over the ocean. The old colonial buildings sat next to modern apartments, the Malecon.

Plus the Andes are amazing. I have been up in the Andes a couple of times and never got to go hiking or exploring, I loved it but it was always cos the wife was working or I had to work there so I never got to really experience them as a holiday but the view from the hotel and bus was great. As a countryside person who loves hiking, mountains, lakes, beaches and archaeological sites I have all of this 20 minutes from my home in the U.K and this is probably why I really struggle with Lima. One of the hardest things about Lima for me is how it is so detached from nature. To manage and get my nature fix in Lima usually involved me walking to the Lake or Jardin de la Paz in La Molina and the latter is a cemetery! Lima just sits there in that horrible desert miles away from anything. It's kind of a shame that Peru's capital is in such a terrible position when you compare it to Quito, Bogota and Santiago.

The history is pretty amazing also, It doesn't matter if you love or hate Peru it has some amazing history that is just sitting out there and you can go and explore it.
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Re: Why I think Peru is one of the best countries to live

Postby Alan » Mon Jan 15, 2018 1:17 pm

I couldn´t agree more regarding nature. If you live in Lima, you really don't have "nature" right outside your door. It's one of the things I miss the most about life in Canada. There is a shortage of nice public spaces overall.

But here is another positive... the weather in Lima is pretty decent. Okay.. there are probably better places in the world, but overall the weather here is great (albeit a little glum). You never experience extremely hot or cold days. You could cycle or play tennis any day of the year if you wanted to.
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Re: Why I think Peru is one of the best countries to live

Postby SilverbackPeru » Mon Jan 15, 2018 3:57 pm

Alan wrote:I couldn´t agree more regarding nature. If you live in Lima, you really don't have "nature" right outside your door. It's one of the things I miss the most about life in Canada. There is a shortage of nice public spaces overall.

But here is another positive... the weather in Lima is pretty decent. Okay.. there are probably better places in the world, but overall the weather here is great (albeit a little glum). You never experience extremely hot or cold days. You could cycle or play tennis any day of the year if you wanted to.


I was on a tight budget, so joining a sports club or buying s bike was really out of my reach at the time. I did join a gym when i first arrived but i just couldn't afford the s/.3000 a year membership. I looked at other cheaper gyms but they were just rust buckets.
Shame about not having a bike as there was some very nice suburbs for cycling around where I lived, very quiet, no traffic, the lake was always nice. Even then it's just not the same as standing on top of a mountain or walking around lakes or through pine forests.
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Re: Why I think Peru is one of the best countries to live

Postby Alan » Mon Jan 15, 2018 5:31 pm

SilverbackPeru wrote:Shame about not having a bike as there was some very nice suburbs for cycling around where I lived, very quiet, no traffic, the lake was always nice. Even then it's just not the same as standing on top of a mountain or walking around lakes or through pine forests.


You got that right! Cycling in traffic is a pretty hairy experience. On the other hand, they have put in a lot of bike paths over the past 3 years. I was cycling Av. Arequipa on Sunday and I noticed they had innaugurated two new bike routes branching off the ciclovia on Av. Arequipa heading towards Av. Javier Prado on one side, and San Borja on the other. Glad to see that... it is the way this city needs to evolve. BTW, they close the entire avenue to traffic Sunday mornings. You can rent skates, bikes, play volleyball, or participate in free aerobics on Larco street next to Parque Kennedy where Arequipa Av. begins. A really nice scene.

If any of you are curious about cycling in Lima, there are a lot of GoPro type videos uploaded to Youtube that take you along different paths in the city.

I don't know if the city has published an integrated map that shows all the routes in the different districts, but if they haven´t, they should.
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Re: Why I think Peru is one of the best countries to live

Postby mrsteak » Mon Jan 15, 2018 5:52 pm

SilverbackPeru wrote:I'm not Lima's biggest fan but there is a few on Alan's list I would agree makes Peru good. I do like how you can go to a variety of different types of bars in Miraflores. There's Jazz clubs, Brazilian or Columbian bars as well as some nice cliff top restaurants and other places that over a view over the ocean. The old colonial buildings sat next to modern apartments, the Malecon.

Plus the Andes are amazing. I have been up in the Andes a couple of times and never got to go hiking or exploring, I loved it but it was always cos the wife was working or I had to work there so I never got to really experience them as a holiday but the view from the hotel and bus was great. As a countryside person who loves hiking, mountains, lakes, beaches and archaeological sites I have all of this 20 minutes from my home in the U.K and this is probably why I really struggle with Lima. One of the hardest things about Lima for me is how it is so detached from nature. To manage and get my nature fix in Lima usually involved me walking to the Lake or Jardin de la Paz in La Molina and the latter is a cemetery! Lima just sits there in that horrible desert miles away from anything. It's kind of a shame that Peru's capital is in such a terrible position when you compare it to Quito, Bogota and Santiago.


Come on... I think in ANY capital of this world you will find all types of restaurants, clubs etc. For being country's capital Lima is really miserable in the sense of options spending your sparse free time. Just look e.g. at Miami, where I travel to frequently. In Little Havana you will find any type of latin restaurants. Colombian, Brazilian, Hondurean, etc etc, not even at a far higher price than Lima (last time I had a lunch in Mia it was around 12 USD).

And yeah the point with Andes... yeah you have lot of places to explore in Peru, but.... you have no way to get there. There is no infrastructure. Just look at google maps. What is shown on maps as a main road usually ends at 5km from the coast as a dusty, dirty and full of holes mule track, without asphalt. There is no emergency lane on the side, no barriers, no markings etc. You really do not want to drive there unless you have a 4x4 military vehicle. Those "roads" are dangerous like f***, I dare you do not drive there!!! I was living in the swiss Alpes for a while and you could really grab your car and drive mostly anywhere, at midnight, during rain... this is the difference between first world country and 5th world country without infrastructure. Those amazing places in Peru are just lost if you cannot reach them within reasonable time and with reasonable means.

Lima is a desert, there is just no nature. Just artificially grown city for far too much people without the necessary infrastructure. You will remember this point if the rain situation repeats again this year.
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Re: Why I think Peru is one of the best countries to live

Postby mrsteak » Mon Jan 15, 2018 5:54 pm

[quote="Alan"
If any of you are curious about cycling in Lima, there are a lot of GoPro type videos uploaded to Youtube that take you along different paths in the city.
[/quote]

... and your pulmonary tract gets full of toxic powder and cancerogenic agents :shock:
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Re: Why I think Peru is one of the best countries to live

Postby SilverbackPeru » Mon Jan 15, 2018 5:56 pm

La Molina would close Raul Ferrero on sunday mornings for cycling but even then there are some good cycle paths to use. The roads around the lake, Las Dunas and Sol de La Molina are usually pretty quiet off the main traffic routes and you can easily walk around there without worrying about the typical lima traffic problems. La Molina is very blessed with parks as well. It was nice sitting out in the sun under some shade during the summer when indoors was unbearably hot.

Talking about cycling videos there use to be a video that promoted the miraflores night time cycle where lots of people would meet to bike around Miraflores. Does that still happen? It would be really nice if there were running/cycling paths around the city like that on the Malecon and in Surco by the ministry of defence building.
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Re: Why I think Peru is one of the best countries to live

Postby SilverbackPeru » Mon Jan 15, 2018 6:06 pm

mrsteak wrote:
SilverbackPeru wrote:I'm not Lima's biggest fan but there is a few on Alan's list I would agree makes Peru good. I do like how you can go to a variety of different types of bars in Miraflores. There's Jazz clubs, Brazilian or Columbian bars as well as some nice cliff top restaurants and other places that over a view over the ocean. The old colonial buildings sat next to modern apartments, the Malecon.

Plus the Andes are amazing. I have been up in the Andes a couple of times and never got to go hiking or exploring, I loved it but it was always cos the wife was working or I had to work there so I never got to really experience them as a holiday but the view from the hotel and bus was great. As a countryside person who loves hiking, mountains, lakes, beaches and archaeological sites I have all of this 20 minutes from my home in the U.K and this is probably why I really struggle with Lima. One of the hardest things about Lima for me is how it is so detached from nature. To manage and get my nature fix in Lima usually involved me walking to the Lake or Jardin de la Paz in La Molina and the latter is a cemetery! Lima just sits there in that horrible desert miles away from anything. It's kind of a shame that Peru's capital is in such a terrible position when you compare it to Quito, Bogota and Santiago.


Come on... I think in ANY capital of this world you will find all types of restaurants, clubs etc. For being country's capital Lima is really miserable in the sense of options spending your sparse free time. Just look e.g. at Miami, where I travel to frequently. In Little Havana you will find any type of latin restaurants. Colombian, Brazilian, Hondurean, etc etc, not even at a far higher price than Lima (last time I had a lunch in Mia it was around 12 USD).

And yeah the point with Andes... yeah you have lot of places to explore in Peru, but.... you have no way to get there. There is no infrastructure. Just look at google maps. What is shown on maps as a main road usually ends at 5km from the coast as a dusty, dirty and full of holes mule track, without asphalt. There is no emergency lane on the side, no barriers, no markings etc. You really do not want to drive there unless you have a 4x4 military vehicle. Those "roads" are dangerous like f***, I dare you do not drive there!!! I was living in the swiss Alpes for a while and you could really grab your car and drive mostly anywhere, at midnight, during rain... this is the difference between first world country and 5th world country without infrastructure. Those amazing places in Peru are just lost if you cannot reach them within reasonable time and with reasonable means.

Lima is a desert, there is just no nature. Just artificially grown city for far too much people without the necessary infrastructure. You will remember this point if the rain situation repeats again this year.


Yeah there isn't a great deal of clubs, bars for the size of Lima, it is true that it's pretty poor for what there is but i still like the variety it offers for cafes etc from other countries around South America. It's different from what you get back home and that's what makes it good.

Yes it's far too populated but it was a lot quieter where i lived on the opposite side of the mountains. There are some well laid out modern parts of the city as well, nice to walk around and would be great to live (if you had the money).

Limas biggest problem is the nice places are bubbles and it's nice to live in those bubbles, it's the stuff outside that drags it down.

I think all places would struggle to match the Alps and Switzerland!
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Re: Why I think Peru is one of the best countries to live

Postby slapshot777 » Tue Jan 16, 2018 3:36 pm

"Yes it's far too populated but it was a lot quieter where i lived on the opposite side of the mountains. There are some well laid out modern parts of the city as well, nice to walk around and would be great to live (if you had the money)."


I was curious where do you live in Peru... you mentioned "on the opposite side of the mountains"

I am thinking about setting up residence in Peru, but would preferably stay countryside/mountains rather than Lima.... trying to avoid all the traffic and congestion.

Thanks!
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Re: Why I think Peru is one of the best countries to live

Postby Alan » Tue Jan 16, 2018 4:18 pm

mrsteak wrote:And yeah the point with Andes... yeah you have lot of places to explore in Peru, but.... you have no way to get there. There is no infrastructure. Just look at google maps. What is shown on maps as a main road usually ends at 5km from the coast as a dusty, dirty and full of holes mule track, without asphalt. There is no emergency lane on the side, no barriers, no markings etc.



This comment, along with many others, makes me wonder just how well you know Peru. "Dirty and full of holes mule track" ?? Really?... I think you either see what you want to see, or you are going out of your way to be negative. I have driven in the Andes and found many, many good secondary and terciary roads. Maybe they are not all signaled, or asphalted, but they are perfectly driveable.
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Re: Why I think Peru is one of the best countries to live

Postby SilverbackPeru » Tue Jan 16, 2018 4:23 pm

I use to live in La Molina. I would recommend it to anyone as you avoid most of Limas problems. It's a lot quieter, lots of nice parks, pretty, sun most of the year rou nd, less traffic. It's extremely safe.

Downside is the commute to Miraflores can take well over two hours in a car during rush hour. It's expensive, from houses to cost of shopping (usually a 20% mark up on prices in shops compared to Miraflores).

I would look for the urban areas that stretch into the valleys in La Molina. Thos valley neighbourhoods are usually only about 4 blocks wide but go on for 20 plus blocks in length, this makes it feel more like a small town than a city.

I'm not always Limas biggest fan but La Molina is a nice place to live.
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Re: Why I think Peru is one of the best countries to live

Postby mrsteak » Tue Jan 16, 2018 4:52 pm

Alan wrote:This comment, along with many others, makes me wonder just how well you know Peru. "Dirty and full of holes mule track" ?? Really?... I think you either see what you want to see, or you are going out of your way to be negative. I have driven in the Andes and found many, many good secondary and terciary roads. Maybe they are not all signaled, or asphalted, but they are perfectly driveable.


Alan: I have really no clue where you have found these roads... everything around Lima is just 5th world country infrastructure. You have Panamericana and carretera central that lead out from Lima, but besides this there are virtually no roads around Lima that I would consider a road. Even the "road" to Cineguilla is hard borderline to drive. There are some drivable sections but also sections full of holes, dangerous crossings etc - not sure if you have been there ever. Otherwise you will find the "roads" around Lima more likely look like this:

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Santiago+De+Surco,+Peru/@-12.4430823,-76.4279145,3a,66.8y,85.86t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1sLXROzpkPl4mgA2Xv98wMnA!2e0!4m2!3m1!1s0x9105b875394f9e21:0x2fc1431693d2759

I assume you did not mean "roads" like the above one - did you??? Otherwise please post a google maps link to the road! (the "roads" in Peru are really so bad that even google maps car did not reach many parts of them, when you try to activate street view you will see that some sections are not marked in blue as they were not transitable for the camera team).
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Re: Why I think Peru is one of the best countries to live

Postby Alan » Tue Jan 16, 2018 11:20 pm

Does Google street view even register the thousands of kilometers of roads criss-crossing Peru? I have no idea but I can promise you -- speaking from personal experience traveling by car throughout Peru -- that you will find an entire network of good driveable roads, many which are paved, or at least hard packed. Are there also bad roads? Of course.. but when you say that roads outside of Lima " dusty, dirty and full of holes mule track, without asphalt." you a misleading the people who come here for honest advice. You don't like Peru... we get it, really.. but you seem to want to convince everyone else to hate it too by spreading exagerations and falsehoods.
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Re: Why I think Peru is one of the best countries to live

Postby mrsteak » Wed Jan 17, 2018 12:40 am

Alan wrote:Does Google street view even register the thousands of kilometers of roads criss-crossing Peru? I have no idea but I can promise you -- speaking from personal experience traveling by car throughout Peru -- that you will find an entire network of good driveable roads, many which are paved, or at least hard packed. Are there also bad roads? Of course.. but when you say that roads outside of Lima " dusty, dirty and full of holes mule track, without asphalt." you a misleading the people who come here for honest advice. You don't like Peru... we get it, really.. but you seem to want to convince everyone else to hate it too by spreading exagerations and falsehoods.


Alan: I posted you a link, you can open it and see how the road looks like. You can post also your link showing me what road around Lima you mean? It is as simple as this - post here the street view link. And yes google cartographed all roads in Peru - everywhere where they could drive, otherwise when the road was not transitable it does not appear in google street view.

So, please post your links showing all the good main roads. Anything around Lima? I'm waiting for your link. When did you drive the last time on carretera central? I did recently and it is a mess. Of course you have some good sections but also you have sections with some 50cm deep holes (if you fall into one of them your car might be destroyed unless you have a military 4x4). Same stuff on the road to Cineguilla... so please SHOW me these good roads! I really want to drive my car somewhere but so far it is just standing around & dusty in my garage coz I cannot drive anywhere here. :twisted:

Maybe you mean Panamericana? This is the only road that I found acceptable but then you drive e.g. 50km south and you would like to get into the country's interior and there are really NO roads except dust tracks. Otherwise show me please, where I can drive to the south via Panamericana and take a good road to get into the Andes? With a normal passenger car, not a Hilux or so.
mrsteak
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Re: Why I think Peru is one of the best countries to live

Postby mrsteak » Wed Jan 17, 2018 12:48 am

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windsportinperu
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Re: Why I think Peru is one of the best countries to live

Postby windsportinperu » Wed Jan 17, 2018 10:33 am

Once MrSteak leaves Peru, the country will be one of the best place to live.. :)
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adrian Thorne
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Re: Why I think Peru is one of the best countries to live

Postby adrian Thorne » Wed Jan 17, 2018 10:54 am

Before requesting others to confirm their truthful statements, I would suggest the presentation of five flimsy examples does not represent the whole of Peru. You must realize you are preaching to people who have already experienced the road conditions here. Perhaps you need to amass the rotten road conditions throughout the country and present it in its entirety. Prior to all this, as you are a fervent believer in presentation of factual evidence, it would be a marvelous opportunity for you to prove you are in fact a resident in Peru and qualified to present these so called facts.

In the mean time I will sit in my garden, enjoying my cold beer , watch the humming birds collecting their nectar and planning my 20 minute drive along Avenue La Molina to Cenergia for lunch with my wife and enjoy the entertainment provided by the restaurant.

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