Reverse Culture Shock

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americorps
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Reverse Culture Shock

Postby americorps » Thu Aug 26, 2010 10:52 am

Here is an article I find interesting about expats suffering culture shock, but NOT from going abroad, but rather when they return home.

The article is very US centric and Peace Corps centric, but I think can apply to a broad range.

I know last time i was home that I had difficulty adjusting to certain habits and found thing I missed greatly from Peru.

http://www.cnn.com/2010/TRAVEL/08/24/cu ... =allsearch

I was wondering if any of you have run across this. I actually do not plan on returning to the US for anything more than a visit, and I can not imagine living there again, but who knows. I think if I do return, it would be a very difficult adjustment for me.


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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby Remigius » Thu Aug 26, 2010 12:56 pm

Culture shock becomes very obvious when you return to your country after a long spell abroad. I started to mix Spanish, Dutch and English words. I had to restrain myself from entering the greengrocer and loudly make my order, even though there were 2 or 3 people waiting in front of me. Waiting for the bus that comes every 10 minutes instead of every second was hard too. But after some weeks you find yourself going with the flow.
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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby zarjoe » Thu Aug 26, 2010 1:57 pm

Americorps... yes, this is a fascinating issue and not necessarily a new or unexplored one in certain domains.

As my work as an Industrial/Organizational Psychologist has taken me to many countries around the world, I have even seen some companies start to offer their expatriate leaders in foreign countries what we refer to as "Expatriation" or "Repatriation" Coaching. Most common is when a company sends a domestic leader abroad for the first time. They frequently offer not just training about language and culture, but many times coaching around transitions and shock for the Exec and his/her family (if they are coming).

My largest client is an oil company who employs thousands of American/Canadian/British expats in the Middle East.... the company gives great benefits which allow the employee and their family to travel back to their home country for 4-6 weeks each year. Prior to this first "repat" experience the executive is given coaching about the coming shock of re-entering what was once familiar and may now seem foreign. They also have classes about the same thing for repatriating family members. Very progressive and wonderful to see a company care for their employees that way.

For the rest of us, unless we expect it, repatriation can be quite a shock as many of the folks on this board know!

Thanks for the link!
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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby tomsax » Thu Aug 26, 2010 2:44 pm

When younger I used to return to the UK from Peru and the main shock was with courting women. While in Peru I could invite most girls to dance and get a happy compliant response, on returning to the UK I was usually turned down flat.

These days I think I would be turned down flat in both countries and my courting days are long over anyway.

My main shock now is how quickly I get back into the groove in the UK. A few days go by and it´s as if I had never left and as if Peru never existed. But then that is really frightening when it happens!
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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby Kelly » Thu Aug 26, 2010 2:52 pm

I wonder how different repatriation is for younger people vs. older?

I mean, someone who goes to Peru (or wherever) in their early 20's, when they're just starting to make an adult life for themselves to begin with, would probably have a much more difficult time adjusting when they return than someone who left in their 40s+.

I'd think it's probably easier to 'get back in the groove' when you actually have a groove to return to rather than being someone who never really had a job and supported themselves at home.
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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby tomsax » Thu Aug 26, 2010 4:46 pm

Very true Kelly. Also, as suggested in the article posed by Americorps, when a younger person gets back they have been more radically changed by the experience whereas older codgers like myself have got stuck in our ways (and for each respective country - I have a groove to get back into for both Peru and the UK). I remember coming back from Peru for the first time when I was 24 and I didn't have a job or a plan and yes it was hard for that reason. Not sure if that is culture shock or just reality shock.
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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby Kelly » Thu Aug 26, 2010 7:00 pm

I went to Korea for a year (Army) when I was in my 20s, and remember distinctly not wanting to go back to the US. But I can't say that I remember anything about coming back to the US, as far as it being a culture shock. Probably not as significant going from one Army base to the next. ;)
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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby anuta » Thu Aug 26, 2010 7:32 pm

tomsax wrote:
My main shock now is how quickly I get back into the groove in the UK. A few days go by and it´s as if I had never left and as if Peru never existed. But then that is really frightening when it happens!


Same thing for me ! It's been 2 months since I'm in Canada and it only took a day or so to feel like home. Because it's home :).
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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby sunflower » Thu Aug 26, 2010 9:21 pm

I was around 24 or 25 when I left Germany and first traveled through Africa and later lived in a few different countries there. Coming back to Germany after 10+ years I had a real culture shock. I didn't fit in anymore, not only the climate was cold, but the people as well, I couldn't cope with the mentality anymore, I didn't feel at home, problems people had and were talking about, seemed to me so unimportant.... It was awful. My son who grew up in Africa until he was 8, had similar problems. Even if his papers say he is German, today he probably is a African Peruvian :?
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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby mammalu » Thu Aug 26, 2010 11:16 pm

Eventhough I was born in Peru, when I fly back home to NJ, at the airport my smile gets bigger, the sunshine is brighter and it is home for me!
Stand with anybody that stands RIGHT. Stand with him while he is right and PART with him when he goes wrong." ! Abraham Lincoln
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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby tupacperu » Thu Aug 26, 2010 11:52 pm

I experienced culture shock after leaving Peru March 2010 and taking a job in Phoenix, AZ.
Had nothing to do with the location, but everything to do with the stress of returning to the system. I had to buy a car, car insurance, gasoline and go into a little debt (credit score 0), Medical insurance ($$$), daily commute, traffic etc..... I can feel the stress here after being out of the system for 7 years.

In Peru, no car (taxis), no car insurance, no car repairs, no worrying about gasoline prices. 30 lemons for 1 sole (one lemon for about 3 soles here). I miss Peru, I use to smile when I arrive at Jorge Chavez, the smells of food on the streets, street vendors as I take a taxi to my place. Even in the winter the musky smell of moisture on the cement walls . I like to gaze at the buildings old and new, and even some hap-hazardly built. Watching the people hustle and bustle to work. It reminds me so much of NY when I lived there as a kids.

We plan to return soon. Though the price of housing here in Tempe/Phoenix, AZ are so much more comfortable than Peru, there something about Peru that money cannot buy here in the USA. Maybe it's the people. Street sweeper, police, the corner bakery, the fruit carts. Always a greeting from Peruvian no matter what their plight.

As PTurboe said "so many Peruvians work to live, they do not live to work."

Just want to get back to where life was simple "and affordable - food"
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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby rgamarra » Fri Aug 27, 2010 10:08 am

For me I think the first culture shock I experienced was when I returned to Central Florida (for a visit) after the housing market had collapsed and the economy had began to sink. Here were my impressions in no particular order:

A.) Wow, there are a lot of newer cars here (this was before more people started driving new cars in Peru.)
B.) Wow, all the strip malls and storefronts are empty.
C.) Where is everybody?
D.) Why is it so quiet?
E.) The food is so bland!
F.) I don't remember the news being so superficial and boring.

Also, it took me a while to get out of the "look over your shoulder every 5 seconds" mentality when out in public.

My hardest adjustment was probably moving to Louisville, Kentucky. It was very "third world" like Lima, but the benefit of Lima was that I could more easily manipulate the bureaucracy to my advantage. Perhaps it was ignorance that bothered me the most in KY.

Now I live in Arlington, TX (between Dallas/Ft. Worth) and I'm loving it here. In so many ways it reminds me of Lima and there are cities here that are similar to a few Limean districts. The cost of living is high compared to Lima and you can't get around (at least in my city) without a car, but other than that, the DFW area is the only area I would want to live in the U.S. - Once I've finished my degree we will be back in Peru, but for now this is home for us.
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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby falcon123 » Fri Aug 27, 2010 12:02 pm

Well Things have changed a lot.

I have returned to Virginia after three years, right now the unemployment is higher than
what the government currently says, Companies have lowered salaries, and inflation has
increased the price of some products.

There is a rise in Crime, I live close to an upscale area, some houses have been robbed,
and somebody has already tried to break in my house three times.

Obamas rhetoric sounds exactly the same like the one that Alan Garcia had on his first
government, and from the results of his administration looks like things are going to
go downhill soon.

On the positive side houses are falling fast. That means that I might own a house free
a clear in year, the only thing that I wonder is how most people will react when their
houses are not worth much.
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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby tupacperu » Fri Aug 27, 2010 1:17 pm

falcon123 wrote:Well Things have changed a lot.

I have returned to Virginia after three years, right now the unemployment is higher than
what the government currently says, Companies have lowered salaries, and inflation has
increased the price of some products.

There is a rise in Crime, I live close to an upscale area, some houses have been robbed,
and somebody has already tried to break in my house three times.

Obamas rhetoric sounds exactly the same like the one that Alan Garcia had on his first
government, and from the results of his administration looks like things are going to
go downhill soon.

On the positive side houses are falling fast. That means that I might own a house free
a clear in year, the only thing that I wonder is how most people will react when their
houses are not worth much.


Culture shock is returning to a desk job in the USA after working from home (peru) for 7 years :-)

I am not political, but as far as the economics in the USA, Obama iherited the mess. Bush made a narrow escape to end his term with this disaster. So, if any body is to blame, it is Bush and his admin.

There is a thread on crime in Peru in (News and views). I agree things are getting bad in Peru. Today there is an article in Correo (www.correoperu.com.pe), which has renamed Chiclayo"knopwn as the City of friendship"to a City that lack security "Cuidad de inseguridad). I cover all the rags daily in Peru and lately and crime is increasing more and more as the economy gets better.
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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby Kelly » Fri Aug 27, 2010 1:22 pm

Before this goes any further - remember this thread is about culture shock, not US problems with economy/politics etc. There are a multitude of threads regarding that topic elsewhere on the forum, so let's keep them there. ;)
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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby tupacperu » Fri Aug 27, 2010 1:32 pm

Kelly wrote:Before this goes any further - remember this thread is about culture shock, not US problems with economy/politics etc. There are a multitude of threads regarding that topic elsewhere on the forum, so let's keep them there. ;)


That is why I referenced the NEWS and Views Thread in expat :-)


Regards
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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby Ron » Sun Aug 29, 2010 6:20 pm

The wife and I are constantly talking about our return to Lima. Although I have lived in Canada for all but my three years in Lima, I no longer feel comfortable here. I love "coming home" to Peru every December. The family, friends and of course the food make it for me. Here in Canada I have an excellent income and only work 24 hours/wk and still more stressed and have less fun than I did in Lima. There is something about Peru that fits me like an old shoe and I love it. I am even listening to Studio 92 online I as write this!!!!
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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby koplinfamilia » Sun Aug 29, 2010 9:19 pm

anuta wrote:
tomsax wrote:
My main shock now is how quickly I get back into the groove in the UK. A few days go by and it´s as if I had never left and as if Peru never existed. But then that is really frightening when it happens!


Same thing for me ! It's been 2 months since I'm in Canada and it only took a day or so to feel like home. Because it's home :).


It's sad but true. I have lived abouad in Israel, Mexico and most recently in Peru and I always experience the shock of the culture change and hope that I will not adapt so quickly to my American life style... unfortunately it does only take a short time because it is home.

On the other hand I have always taken things back with me and changed my life in some way to adapt somewhat to those precious ideals I learned aboad.

Ultimately, I long for that "simple" life... heading back to Peru in a few months!
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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby americorps » Sun Aug 29, 2010 9:27 pm

well, besides the pre-requisite that every thread devolves in a comparison between the US and Peru.... sigh..it is so very tiresome.

I am a little surprised at some of the comments. Suggesting that one easily acclimates to USA because it is the best country in the world is fine, but does that suggest because I no longer suites my lifestyle that I am somehow not patriotic?

Or that people can go with the flow without problem, does that suggest something is wrong with those who do not?

I know people who have had significant culture shock to the point that it caused depression and severe social problems. It can be a serious issue. Culture shock has broken families, friends, and created very real and long-lasting difficulties and I would not presume that since most of us cope well enough that it is something we should just dismiss as a little bump.
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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby tomsax » Mon Aug 30, 2010 4:08 am

Americorps, I think you are reading suggestions into replies that simply don't exist. Speaking for myself, I'm just giving my own experience. Certainly Im not dismissing anywones return culture shock or suggesting that anyone is unpatriotic if they can't fit quickly back in to things when they return to their home country. I think a lot of us have thought about this and just want to share our own experiences and thoughts.
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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby tupacperu » Mon Aug 30, 2010 12:34 pm

I work for an International Company in Phoenix, Az. I work with Brazilians, Mexicans, Argentinians, Venezuelans etc... Most are here on a 5 year visa. The main theme with many of them: They miss family and friends. Somehow there seems to be a disconnect in industrialized countries when it come to family.
Whne I ask what they miss about their country, they give a depressed look "family and friends" are the themes. A few want to return to their country when their visas expire.

My wife went through depression when we moved back to the USA. I do not think it is a comparision (USA and Peru) it's just a cultural difference as far as priorities. In industrialized nations it is about "ME". Childrens move out and get married and there focus is no longer in the extended family but "immediate family"

I guess that is what I like the most about living in Peru. The celebration of family.
When in Peru and we are in a restaurant, there is never a waiter hurrying is for a tip. We sit there for hours conversing with family, enjoying our short time together.
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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby Remigius » Mon Aug 30, 2010 1:23 pm

tupacperu wrote:I guess that is what I like the most about living in Peru. The celebration of family.
When in Peru and we are in a restaurant, there is never a waiter hurrying is for a tip. We sit there for hours conversing with family, enjoying our short time together.


Have you ever realised that those hours of conversing with the family is because after not having seen each other for a such a long time, you actually have a lot to talk about? :) People often say that we Europeans are "cold", because we don't visit family every day. However, when we have a gathering, we can indeed talk for hours about the most amazing things. When I'm with my wife's family (about 3x a week), the conversations tend to be boring and repetitive, because usually nothing surprising has happened after 1 or 2 days, so they start talking about how lame and corrupt this politician is, how bad the traffic, and that you are not safe anywhere. You also start to notice (although I don't know about other Peruvian families), that tension rises at times because you're so often together and sometimes people start to irritate each other.
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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby viernes » Mon Aug 30, 2010 3:21 pm

I always think it is so funny when people come back to the U.S. after being out of the country for a year or two and they act like they can't remember how to speak English.

It's true that sometimes you have to adjust back to the groove, but in one case where a friend of mine had been out of the country for two years and acted like an idiot for months after he came back. I mean really 25 years here, 2 years there......ummmm, you probably didn't forget english.

I agree with those comments about coming back and feeling almost like you dreamt being away. I remember the very first time I went to peru at 20, it was surreal being there for a long time, having not traveled much prior to that, but coming back wasn't tough.
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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby tupacperu » Mon Aug 30, 2010 5:25 pm

viernes wrote:I always think it is so funny when people come back to the U.S. after being out of the country for a year or two and they act like they can't remember how to speak English.

It's true that sometimes you have to adjust back to the groove, but in one case where a friend of mine had been out of the country for two years and acted like an idiot for months after he came back. I mean really 25 years here, 2 years there......ummmm, you probably didn't forget english.

I agree with those comments about coming back and feeling almost like you dreamt being away. I remember the very first time I went to peru at 20, it was surreal being there for a long time, having not traveled much prior to that, but coming back wasn't tough.



I actually catch myself speaking Spanglish. I can tell by the look on my family and friends face. I catch myslef flipping between spanish and english, even while doing hoework with my 8 year old.
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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby tupacperu » Mon Aug 30, 2010 5:35 pm

Remigius wrote:
tupacperu wrote:I guess that is what I like the most about living in Peru. The celebration of family.
When in Peru and we are in a restaurant, there is never a waiter hurrying is for a tip. We sit there for hours conversing with family, enjoying our short time together.


Have you ever realised that those hours of conversing with the family is because after not having seen each other for a such a long time, you actually have a lot to talk about? :) People often say that we Europeans are "cold", because we don't visit family every day. However, when we have a gathering, we can indeed talk for hours about the most amazing things. When I'm with my wife's family (about 3x a week), the conversations tend to be boring and repetitive, because usually nothing surprising has happened after 1 or 2 days, so they start talking about how lame and corrupt this politician is, how bad the traffic, and that you are not safe anywhere. You also start to notice (although I don't know about other Peruvian families), that tension rises at times because you're so often together and sometimes people start to irritate each other.



All of my wife's family live close or are in constant contact. They speak about 3 to 4 times a week. The family is so big that there is always chismas (gossip), someoen getting married, having a baby, losing their job, or going into the hospital with an illness. I gues it depends on the size of the family if there is nothing to say but once a week. I currently have a vonage number in Peru, where family can call my wife and talking for hours is a daily ritual. So again, it depends.

My family (USA) gets together about once or twice a YEAR (FAMILY REUNION SOMETIMES) and Xmas. Other than that, life is too busy.


There was an article prior to the crisis (housing), that many couple bought a big expensive house and only had time to eat and sleep, after long hours of work and working weekends to pay for the home. Not many families join at the dinner table same time each day becasue of work and schedule.

But, for me in Peru, meals were like clock work and we all sat down together. Something I had only done in a previous marriage on Thanksgiving and Xmas. Almost every weekend my wife prepared lunch at our home in Peru for here mother and sisters. Last year they all got together for a week (4 sister, kids and mother) at our place while I was in Philly. They talked and chatted all day. I would call and hear them in teh background, so my conversations with my wife were short.

I guess it it a cultural thing or just a priority. But I used to be in a mode where money was time, and doing alot of eating on the road. My wife has taught me to stop and savor the food and savor the life and family I am lucky to have.

MHO
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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby Ron » Tue Aug 31, 2010 11:41 am

tupacperu wrote:But, for me in Peru, meals were like clock work and we all sat down together. Something I had only done in a previous marriage on Thanksgiving and Xmas. Almost every weekend my wife prepared lunch at our home in Peru for here mother and sisters. Last year they all got together for a week (4 sister, kids and mother) at our place while I was in Philly. They talked and chatted all day. I would call and hear them in teh background, so my conversations with my wife were short.

I guess it it a cultural thing or just a priority. But I used to be in a mode where money was time, and doing alot of eating on the road. My wife has taught me to stop and savor the food and savor the life and family I am lucky to have.


That hits it right on the head for me and my family. My mom lives 9 houses away and my sister 2 blocks and I almost never see them. Busy they say. We get together about 3-4 times a year for various dinners but that's about it. Here is a perfect example. After being in Lima for three years my mom met my wife and I at the airport. Every year when we go back to Lima, my mother-in-law and my two bothers-in-law meet us at the airport with flowers and want to go out to dinner right away!!! When we leave Lima the whole family comes to the airport including the aunts, uncles and cousins!!!!! Incredible. I don't know if this falls under the title of "Culture Shock", but it is surely the thing I miss most about Lima.
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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby tomsax » Tue Aug 31, 2010 12:43 pm

Wikipedia has an interesting entry on Culture shock where it talks about the Adjustment phase which typically would be in 6 - 12 months of being in a new country saying:

There are three basic outcomes of the Adjustment Phase:

Some people find it impossible to accept the foreign culture and integrate. They isolate themselves from the host country's environment, which they come to perceive as hostile, withdraw into a "ghetto" and see return to their own culture as the only way out. These "Rejectors" also have the greatest problems re-integrating back home after return.

Some people integrate fully and take on all parts of the host culture while losing their original identity. They normally remain in the host country forever. This group is sometimes know as "Adopters".

Some people manage to adapt the aspects of the host culture they see as positive, while keeping some of their own and creating their unique blend. They have no major problems returning home or relocating elsewhere. This group can be thought to be somewhat cosmopolitan.

Culture shock has many different effects, time spans, and degrees of severity.[10] Many people are handicapped by its presence and don't recognize what is bothering them.


I find interesting the idea that the people who reject the new culture they have been exposed to are the MOST likely to have trouble reintegrating in their home country when they return. I like to think of myself in the third group and "cosmopolitan". :D

In my experience of expats in Peru I haven't met many "Adopters" but have met a a least one Peruvian "Adopter" in London. I met a Peruvian women who said she had no interest in returning even though she hadn't seen her family for 20 years - though I admit that this is uncommon and most are "cosmopolitan".

(By the way Americorps, I have met you and also think you are most like a "cosmopolitan" and actually don't think you will have difficulty reintegrating back to life in the US)
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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby Alpineprince » Tue Aug 31, 2010 1:49 pm

I have always thought of myself as cosmopolitan. Even though I do not understand Spanish (after 7 years) I could never live in the USA again. I guess i am an adopter as I could easily see myself living someplace in the
former Yugoslavia or Italy, but would never consider an English speaking country!
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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby Polaron » Thu Sep 02, 2010 12:37 pm

I have found that the older I get, the harder it is to re-adapt to living in the U.S.A. In 1998, I returned to the U.S. from Spain, thinking that since I was near 40, things would be easier to deal with and I would get to spend more time with family. After 13 months in the Phoenix area, where I'd gone to high school, I was utterly fed up and retreated back to Mexico, where I'd spent 12 years of my life.

When my parents passed away in 2005, I went back to Arizona, this time Tucson, to take care of their affairs and help out my sister, who, it turns out, did not need any help. I lasted only 5 months that time, until I said "screw this" and headed for new adventures in South America.

The consumer goods, availability of credit and conveniences in the USA are mightily tempting, but I find it hard to relate to the people there now. I always feel like I don't fit in, and I perceive the people, for the most part, as cold, materialistic, rude and violent. I do not mean to indict American society; this is just the way that I feel. I may be totally mistaken, but that's the way I feel.
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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby tupacperu » Thu Sep 02, 2010 2:11 pm

Polaron wrote:I have found that the older I get, the harder it is to re-adapt to living in the U.S.A. In 1998, I returned to the U.S. from Spain, thinking that since I was near 40, things would be easier to deal with and I would get to spend more time with family. After 13 months in the Phoenix area, where I'd gone to high school, I was utterly fed up and retreated back to Mexico, where I'd spent 12 years of my life.

When my parents passed away in 2005, I went back to Arizona, this time Tucson, to take care of their affairs and help out my sister, who, it turns out, did not need any help. I lasted only 5 months that time, until I said "screw this" and headed for new adventures in South America.

The consumer goods, availability of credit and conveniences in the USA are mightily tempting, but I find it hard to relate to the people there now. I always feel like I don't fit in, and I perceive the people, for the most part, as cold, materialistic, rude and violent. I do not mean to indict American society; this is just the way that I feel. I may be totally mistaken, but that's the way I feel.



I whole-heartedly agree. I am 56 and the older you get the less you feel at home in my own country.
Last edited by tupacperu on Thu Sep 02, 2010 2:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby tupacperu » Thu Sep 02, 2010 2:11 pm

Polaron wrote:I have found that the older I get, the harder it is to re-adapt to living in the U.S.A. In 1998, I returned to the U.S. from Spain, thinking that since I was near 40, things would be easier to deal with and I would get to spend more time with family. After 13 months in the Phoenix area, where I'd gone to high school, I was utterly fed up and retreated back to Mexico, where I'd spent 12 years of my life.

When my parents passed away in 2005, I went back to Arizona, this time Tucson, to take care of their affairs and help out my sister, who, it turns out, did not need any help. I lasted only 5 months that time, until I said "screw this" and headed for new adventures in South America.

The consumer goods, availability of credit and conveniences in the USA are mightily tempting, but I find it hard to relate to the people there now. I always feel like I don't fit in, and I perceive the people, for the most part, as cold, materialistic, rude and violent. I do not mean to indict American society; this is just the way that I feel. I may be totally mistaken, but that's the way I feel.



I whole-heartedly agree. I am 56 and the older you get the less you feel at home in my own country.
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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby pingouin59 » Thu Sep 02, 2010 2:18 pm

It was in July 2009 that I moved to Peru and after 8 years in the US where I never felt at home, I may move somewhere else in the future but certainly not there. For me home is where you have love, a good job, and a family. I found the three here in Peru. Home is also where I come from originally, that is Northern France. The culture shock I have experienced very recently was and still is going back from Europe, Arriving in Madrid and then Paris, I was amazed to see how public transportation was modern, how standard it is to take a warm shower, how good it was to eat real cheese and take time to have an ´apero¨with friends . I had almost forgotten how the cars stop to let you cross and so many other things that I miss now that I am back in Peru. Don´t get me wrong, I love living in Peru and I enjoy how warm and more humble people are here. Life is easier for a lot of reasons However,now I need to readapt again to the big mess, the hateful bus driver, the outdated electrical system and the cold shower.
Oh well spring is coming and things are going to be fine. Need to go, Lunch is ready

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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby PTTurboe » Thu Sep 02, 2010 3:49 pm

I REALLY miss good cheese...
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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby sarita » Thu Sep 02, 2010 5:25 pm

I''m 23 and have now been in Peru for 16 months now with only a short 16 day vacation home last December. When I went home the first time I was in some culture shock but nothing that lasted more than a day but I found myself missing Peru or constantly talking about how things would be done here instead of how it is there. I know for sure I will be in culture shock this time because I have friends that talk about things and I have NO idea what they are talking about. They just laugh at me and then show me it online. Just small things like this make me think how comfortable I have become in Peru and the life I started here.My english has also gotten worse. I find myself unable to say certain things in English or I saw them in the strangest way from hearing such broken english all the time. I moved here 2 days after graduating college so this being my first time on my own, living alone and everything is sure to bring some serious culture shock AND I still have another 4 months before I will be home again!
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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby curlyguy18 » Sat Sep 04, 2010 5:18 pm

I came back from the UK about a week ago and I'm dealing with a great deal of reverse culture shock! I was in London for a year but it only took me a few weeks to get into the swing of things. Plus I never really had any much culture shock the whole time I was there. Now that I'm back home I no longer have the same sense of security I did when I was in London (and I was in Hackney!) or the same sense of security before I left for the UK. I just feel paranoid when I'm out and about, more so at night, and I can't even take my camera out. My mom's house got robbed last year and my sister got her gold earrings snatched from her ears while she was holding her baby! So I'm paranoid now.

Also, I forgot how dusty it is here. Way too dusty! Men urinating in public and drivers sticking their hands out instead of using the turn signals. In my case, I think I got very used to life in Britain and now I have to re-adjust.
This is not to say I didn't miss Peru, because I did. I missed my family, friends, food and more stable weather. But I think I prefer life on the big northern European Isles.
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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby Kelly » Sat Sep 04, 2010 9:53 pm

Welcome home, Junior. :)
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Re: Reverse Culture Shock

Postby rama0929 » Sun Sep 05, 2010 12:14 pm

Polaron wrote:The consumer goods, availability of credit and conveniences in the USA are mightily tempting...


And that's one of the reasons I haven't left here for there. Both places have their advantages and disadvantages, but I have more relative safety and peace of mind here in the States.

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