Exchange student from Norway

Answers to your qestions about moving to, and living in, Peru,
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Exchange student from Norway

Postby Kristian » Fri Jan 14, 2011 10:51 am

Hi everyone! My name is Kristian, I'm from Norway, and I'm going to spend the forthcoming semester as an exchange student at Universidad San Ignacio de Loyola.

I'll arrive in Lima the 1st of february, but school doesn't start until the 10th of march. I'll be keeping myself occupied with El Sol's language/dancing/cooking classes for 4 weeks, starting the 7th of february. I will leave Peru in the middle/end of july.

1) I don't wish to spend the first week (2nd-6th) alone inside my student flat though, so I was wondering if you have any suggestions for what to do or see in Lima? I'll be living in Miraflores.

2) Also, I have never been a foreigner before, so I was wondering if you have any particular advice concerning that. I don't speak spanish very well yet (only started learning casually in november), but I reckon some charm and a selection of colloquial phrases will do the trick.

Looking forward to hearing from you, and perhaps meet up? Although I'd like to know locals and learn the language and culture, it would also be nice to know a few other foreigners I think.


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Re: Exchange student from Norway

Postby sunflower » Fri Jan 14, 2011 6:29 pm

Check out www.limaeasy.com. Lots of useful info on Lima, tourists sides, what to do and better not to do, ....
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Re: Exchange student from Norway

Postby Kristian » Sun Jan 16, 2011 9:04 am

Thanks for the link, there seems to be quite a bit of good practical information there.

The "have fun in Lima" page only has city tours, zoos, parks and kids' corner though :P I like walking, so I'll check out the parks, but the rest isn't really for a 22-year old exchange student. I'll keep having a look around; keep the suggestions coming!
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Re: Exchange student from Norway

Postby Kelly » Sun Jan 16, 2011 1:02 pm

Some might disagree, but I'd recommend taking a city tour - it's a great way to see the major sites, get to know the city a little, and gives you a chance to talk to other people. The 'Mirabus' tour buses have a kiosk in the center of Parque kennedy in Miraflores, and they have a lot of fun tours.

You also may want to check out the main page of the Expat Peru (click the logo on the top left) and look in the tab "Living in Lima" - there are tips for socializing and finding things to do.
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Re: Exchange student from Norway

Postby Kristian » Sun Jan 16, 2011 4:56 pm

Thanks to you too for your helpfulness. I somehow managed to miss that bit of the website, apologies.

Concerning city tours, I now realised it could function as an excellent spontaneity trigger, since it's the way I'd get to see the most things in one go.

Through the socializing link, I came across Toastmasters. Sounds like a good way to get used to speaking/learning spanish, and getting used to speaking in public while I'm at it. Fun challenge.

I guess the information I've gotten so far is sufficient for now. I'll come back should I have any further things on my mind. Cheers!

P.S. Just a little more than two weeks before I'm there! I can't believe I'm actually going to spend half a year across the globe, even taking a couple of university courses in spanish. Although I'd have fun at home too, this is the ultimate chance to do something "crazy" I figure :)
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Re: Exchange student from Norway

Postby Peace2009 » Mon Jan 17, 2011 11:47 am

A few tips for ya:

If you land during the day, find a taxi outside the airport will cost you significantly less. To Miraflores will be 20-25 soles (30 during rush hour and if you are not a good negotiator). If you take the "official" taxi, it will be about 70-80 soles. Yes there is a potential danger of kidnapping, but hey, what's life good for without some edge?

Avoid shady places like Los Olivos at night at all cost, even if you are permitted to carry a machine gun in Peru :)

Barranco has some very cool bars to hangout, and excellent restaurants.

Miraflores largely sucks as a lot of shops charge you "developed nation prices" for "developing nation services".

Schools are okay but most Peruvians are NOT PUNCTUAL. Don't get mad if they are late.

Most prices can be negotiated (except supermarkets)
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Re: Exchange student from Norway

Postby Remigius » Mon Jan 17, 2011 12:14 pm

Peace2009 wrote:A few tips for ya:

If you land during the day, find a taxi outside the airport will cost you significantly less. To Miraflores will be 20-25 soles (30 during rush hour and if you are not a good negotiator). If you take the "official" taxi, it will be about 70-80 soles. Yes there is a potential danger of kidnapping, but hey, what's life good for without some edge?


Kristian, forget the above piece of advise. When you come for the first time to Peru, the last thing you want to do is to grab a taxi from the street. Once you are here for a while, you will be able to recognise bad taxi (drivers), but for starters just take the official taxi to prevent your first day in Lima to become a nasty remembrance. Secondly, Miraflores is an excellent place to get accustomed to the Peruvian way of life. Sure, prices are a bit higher then other (shady) places, but it's the best place to start. Once you have settled down, you can try out other things, but remember, Lima is a hectic city and for someone new in town it can be quite intimidating. Take things slowly!
Last edited by Remigius on Mon Jan 17, 2011 12:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Exchange student from Norway

Postby Kelly » Mon Jan 17, 2011 12:38 pm

I will second Remigius here - I would never recommend for someone to come to Peru for the first time - ESPECIALLY someone who doesn't speak Spanish! - to go outside the airport to look for a hack cab on the street. I know one man from S. Africa who did so, and withing an hour of being in Peru had nothing to his name but the clothes on his back - and considered himself lucky to still have that.

Taxis are no longer allowed to go inside the airport and look for customers, but you can often find a driver who has dropped off a client and is looking for a fare to return to Lima with. The best bet is to check with your hostel or hotel, usually they work with drivers who will pick you up. If not, there are plenty of taxi services that do airport pick-up for 35-45 soles (airport to Miraflores - other locations may be more or less).
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Re: Exchange student from Norway

Postby Kristian » Mon Jan 17, 2011 12:51 pm

Peace2009 wrote:A few tips for ya:

If you land during the day, find a taxi outside the airport will cost you significantly less. To Miraflores will be 20-25 soles (30 during rush hour and if you are not a good negotiator). If you take the "official" taxi, it will be about 70-80 soles. Yes there is a potential danger of kidnapping, but hey, what's life good for without some edge?

Avoid shady places like Los Olivos at night at all cost, even if you are permitted to carry a machine gun in Peru :)

Barranco has some very cool bars to hangout, and excellent restaurants.

Miraflores largely sucks as a lot of shops charge you "developed nation prices" for "developing nation services".

Schools are okay but most Peruvians are NOT PUNCTUAL. Don't get mad if they are late.

Most prices can be negotiated (except supermarkets)


I will get transportation from the airport by someone at the student dorm I'm staying in, and I mostly really prefer walking, so taxis aren't much of a concern for me. Thanks for the heads up though!

Bars and restaurants are of interest for me, thanks!

Shopping is one of my least favourite activities, so prices aren't that big of a deal to me.

I have already experienced the lack of punctuality through e-mail correspondance. It really takes some getting used to, since I'm accustomed to getting replies with a day or two. Some have said that it's simply because there is less importance put on the concept of time, which actually resonates quite well with my way of thinking :)

drn wrote:May like to get in touche with Sigbjorn Tveteras [email protected]. He is a nice young teacher at Centum Católica Business School. :D He is a Norwegian with a Peruvian wife.


Interesting, thanks!

Remigius wrote:
Peace2009 wrote:A few tips for ya:

If you land during the day, find a taxi outside the airport will cost you significantly less. To Miraflores will be 20-25 soles (30 during rush hour and if you are not a good negotiator). If you take the "official" taxi, it will be about 70-80 soles. Yes there is a potential danger of kidnapping, but hey, what's life good for without some edge?


Kristian, forget the above piece of advise. When you come for the first time to Peru, the last thing you want to do is to grab a taxi from the street. Once you are here for a while, you will be able to recognise bad taxi (drivers), but for starters just take the official taxi to prevent your first day in Lima to become a nasty remembrance. Secondly, Miraflores is an excellent place to get accustomed to the Peruvian way of life. Sure, prices are a bit higher then other (shady) places, but it's the best place to start. Once you have settled down, you can try out other things, but remember, Lima is a hectic city and for someone new in town it can be quite intimidating. Take things slowly!


As mentioned above, I don't imagine myself being very dependant on taxis. Miraflores does indeed seem like a nice and safe place to start my first stay in a big city. I'll make sure not to get the hecticness get to me. It already did once a couple of months ago through university, and I promised myself never to undergo such a thing again.

- One question about clubs and nightlife: Is salsa and proper forms of dancing popular, or is everyone just jabbing back and forth to house music like we do in Norway? :P

Thanks for immensly helpful responses, I'm impressed!
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Re: Exchange student from Norway

Postby Remigius » Mon Jan 17, 2011 4:53 pm

Salsa is a dance you have to use your shoulders and hips. Anyone used to dance on house music for hours will have muscle sore after 10 minutes dancing Salsa.
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Re: Exchange student from Norway

Postby vcmpbou » Tue Jan 18, 2011 11:12 am

Kelly wrote:I will second Remigius here - I would never recommend for someone to come to Peru for the first time - ESPECIALLY someone who doesn't speak Spanish! - to go outside the airport to look for a hack cab on the street. I know one man from S. Africa who did so, and withing an hour of being in Peru had nothing to his name but the clothes on his back - and considered himself lucky to still have that.

Taxis are no longer allowed to go inside the airport and look for customers, but you can often find a driver who has dropped off a client and is looking for a fare to return to Lima with. The best bet is to check with your hostel or hotel, usually they work with drivers who will pick you up. If not, there are plenty of taxi services that do airport pick-up for 35-45 soles (airport to Miraflores - other locations may be more or less).

There is an incorrect impression that only taxis from Airport are dangerous and that at worst you could be robbed. Last November, one rapist taxi driver was arrested by the police, presumably because he did not pay them off. In another case, in collusion with the driver, some people stopped the taxi and temporarily kidnapped the passenger to take him to an ATM. Encouraging a foreigner to live a 'life on the edge' ought to be a criminal offence. Among the middle-income countries, Perú is one of the most corrupt (Source: Transparency International). In another survey by Transparency International regarding relative corruption Peruvians voted their judicial system to be more corrupt than even political system. Peruvians have a point though - it is only the careless (meaning stupid) gringos who encouter traumatic experiences.
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Re: Exchange student from Norway

Postby rama0929 » Tue Jan 18, 2011 1:13 pm

I have a driver in Peru who is also a "chofer," I can provide you his information if you would like.
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Re: Exchange student from Norway

Postby rama0929 » Tue Jan 18, 2011 1:15 pm

vcmpbou wrote:Peruvians have a point though - it is only the careless (meaning stupid) gringos who encouter traumatic experiences.


I'd be willing to bet they were looking for booze (or were drunk), drugs or women. :lol:
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Re: Exchange student from Norway

Postby Kelly » Tue Jan 18, 2011 2:08 pm

vcmpbou wrote:Peruvians have a point though - it is only the careless (meaning stupid) gringos who encouter traumatic experiences.


That's one of the most ridiculous statements I've seen on this forum in a while.
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Re: Exchange student from Norway

Postby alexPeru » Tue Jan 18, 2011 2:25 pm

vcmpbou wrote: Peruvians have a point though - it is only the careless (meaning stupid) gringos who encouter traumatic experiences.


HAH!! That is a ridiculous statement. I know so many Peruvians who have climbed into a taxi and been robbed. Taxis picked up outside Larcomar (they were waiting in the taxi line), at the airport, etc, etc. This one friend climbed into a Taxi Seguro (he picked up in the street), and a couple of blocks later, 2 guys jumped into the car, and took everything from him.

Everyone is vulnerable to being robbed, but some common sense does go far.
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Re: Exchange student from Norway

Postby Peace2009 » Wed Jan 19, 2011 3:07 am

vcmpbou wrote:
Kelly wrote:I will second Remigius here - I would never recommend for someone to come to Peru for the first time - ESPECIALLY someone who doesn't speak Spanish! - to go outside the airport to look for a hack cab on the street. I know one man from S. Africa who did so, and withing an hour of being in Peru had nothing to his name but the clothes on his back - and considered himself lucky to still have that.

Taxis are no longer allowed to go inside the airport and look for customers, but you can often find a driver who has dropped off a client and is looking for a fare to return to Lima with. The best bet is to check with your hostel or hotel, usually they work with drivers who will pick you up. If not, there are plenty of taxi services that do airport pick-up for 35-45 soles (airport to Miraflores - other locations may be more or less).

There is an incorrect impression that only taxis from Airport are dangerous and that at worst you could be robbed. Last November, one rapist taxi driver was arrested by the police, presumably because he did not pay them off. In another case, in collusion with the driver, some people stopped the taxi and temporarily kidnapped the passenger to take him to an ATM. Encouraging a foreigner to live a 'life on the edge' ought to be a criminal offence. Among the middle-income countries, Perú is one of the most corrupt (Source: Transparency International). In another survey by Transparency International regarding relative corruption Peruvians voted their judicial system to be more corrupt than even political system. Peruvians have a point though - it is only the careless (meaning stupid) gringos who encouter traumatic experiences.


Now you are making me feel bad and I feel that I deserve a chance to clarify that.

Yes Peru is very corrupt, but to a more or less equal degree so is every country in the world. East LA, Detroit, London ghetto, or Paris suburbs are just as dangerous, if not more. It is not like you can avoid taking taxis in Peru, so just employ some common sense to minimize the chance of you getting robbed. Observe the taxi, observe the driver, and ask for a the DNI if you have to, this will help a lot. I have been in Peru for a year now and still have not had any problem with taxi drivers although I take them almost everyday.
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Re: Exchange student from Norway

Postby rama0929 » Wed Jan 19, 2011 10:30 am

Kristian wrote:- One question about clubs and nightlife: Is salsa and proper forms of dancing popular, or is everyone just jabbing back and forth to house music like we do in Norway? :P


Given my experiences on the boulevard, there is a lot of jabbing back and forth to rock and cumbia :lol:

Huayno is popular too.
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Re: Exchange student from Norway

Postby chuck » Wed Jan 19, 2011 6:43 pm

drn wrote:
Kelly wrote:
vcmpbou wrote:Peruvians have a point though - it is only the careless (meaning stupid) gringos who encouter traumatic experiences.


That's one of the most ridiculous statements I've seen on this forum in a while.

:?: If this was so; as the moderator, it was your duty to remove it :!:
The point is you haven not understood the point being made :idea: . That is surprising from the wife of a taxi owner :o .
The point being made was that a careless foreigner is likely to encounter traumatic experience. With some precutions, Lima could be safe for a foreigner :) . If the moderator herself uses intemperate language :cry: , expatperu is doomed.



The problem with the point being made is the use of the word ONLY, which is obviously incorrect.
There are 10 types of people in the world — those who understand binary, and those who don't.
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Re: Exchange student from Norway

Postby Kelly » Wed Jan 19, 2011 6:44 pm

I'm afraid I (and just about everyone else here) will have to disagree with you. It's not my duty to remove everything that I disagree with (although some think I do). Rather, it's my duty to remove comments that go against the posted guidelines.


I thank you for pointing out that I may have misunderstood the point. This is precisely why it's not my duty to run about willy-nilly deleting everything I take issue with. :wink:
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Re: Exchange student from Norway

Postby goingnowherefast » Wed Jan 19, 2011 6:44 pm

Moderator, you better put your foot down, expatperu is going to turn into poorbuthappy Colombia, filled with lonely bitter expats who troll forums in their spare time. Make sure that doesn't happen!
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Re: Exchange student from Norway

Postby Remigius » Wed Jan 19, 2011 8:10 pm

drn wrote:Read again. To me, it seems to mean 'only careless foreigners', not 'only foreigners'. The problem is not with the grammar of the original post but with the moderator's vocabulary :shock: .


I think it is interesting to see you scolding people for failing to understand something "so obvious", yet you base yourself on your own personal interpretation: "To me, it seems". Something like: your interpretation is foolish, because mine is correct. That is not how it works. Regardless how you rephrase vcmpbou's comment, the word "likely" that you introduced, is non-existent, therefore per definition vcmpbou's suggestion is wrong, for even careful foreigners are prone to become victim of traumatic experiences, just as careful and careless Peruvians. Just as it is wrong to suggest Lima could be safe for a foreigner if foreigners would me more careful. Or did you mean safer. Grammar is important!
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Re: Exchange student from Norway

Postby rama0929 » Wed Jan 19, 2011 8:18 pm

drn wrote:Yes :!: the moderator has requested members several times not to disparage each other. But then she herself uses intemperate language as does goingnowherefast :shock: .


There's a difference between using "intemperate language" and flame wars/trolling
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Re: Exchange student from Norway

Postby goingnowherefast » Thu Jan 20, 2011 12:05 am

Maybe some here know, but circa '05-'06 poorbuthappy Colombia used to be a great forum and an excellent resource to meet up with people, make contacts, and basically anything you could possibly want. Then over the years it just got filled with the same bitter people saying the same bitter things. Finally the mods shut it down in '09 I think it was because someone couldn't even post "hello" without it turning into an argument. In the short time I've been here, the same thing looks like it's happening. 'Intermittent' language as they call it should be ok, this isn't the Central Park Ladies Tea Club, but when entire threads with useful questions get hijacked and turn into 'who's the best expat' contests or meaningless arguments about semantics, it takes a good forum that could be or potentially is a great resource into just another dark corner of the internet. /2 cents
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Re: Exchange student from Norway

Postby Kristian » Thu Jan 20, 2011 5:42 am

Haha, thanks for all the information, although the heated arguments about forum quality are a bit much ;)

I will definitely ask others about the transportation safety issues, and don't go anywhere alone at night (I guess that goes for all big cities, really). I guess leaving my Visa card at home would prevent being dragged to an ATM like described above. I'm a very calm person, which I think would help if something should happen.

I have a couple of other questions too:

- How should I dress? I've read that people generally dress more formally than I'm used to. According to the weather forecast, it's going to be quite hot: Would a short-sleeved shirt, knee-length shorts (not denim) and sandals be an "acceptable" manner to dress? What about when going out, now that it's hot?

- Could you name one or two songs that most people in Peru would know? I wanna learn a couple of songs to break the ice, so I won't be completely dependant on my beginner spanish.

Thanks again!
- Kristian
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Re: Exchange student from Norway

Postby markr » Thu Jan 20, 2011 6:55 am

Quote. "Could you name one or two songs that most people in Peru would know? I wanna learn a couple of songs to break the ice, so I won't be completely dependant on my beginner spanish."

This one usually goes down well with the locals.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Yomr3_81Ps
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Re: Exchange student from Norway

Postby Remigius » Thu Jan 20, 2011 8:47 am

Kristian wrote:- How should I dress? I've read that people generally dress more formally than I'm used to. According to the weather forecast, it's going to be quite hot: Would a short-sleeved shirt, knee-length shorts (not denim) and sandals be an "acceptable" manner to dress? What about when going out, now that it's hot?


You can dress the way you like; however, for job interviews, weddings and other formal occasions, you are expected to wear a suit.

- Could you name one or two songs that most people in Peru would know? I wanna learn a couple of songs to break the ice, so I won't be completely dependant on my beginner spanish.


Breaking the ice is a piece of cake when you use the fact Peruvians are very proud on their country (especially food) in your advantage. Peru is famous for its potato variety. Just say "these potatoes are the best I've ever eaten" and you basically bring the house down ;)
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Re: Exchange student from Norway

Postby Remigius » Thu Jan 20, 2011 6:58 pm

lib wrote:Most would agree. In the present instance, the moderator called a post 'ridiculous' without assigning any reasons. Could have been avoided.


Perhaps the choice of words could have been avoided, but to be honest, the first time I saw the infamous post I had the same reaction popping up in my mind. Sometimes comments are so blatantly wrong, it triggers a special reaction from the more experienced Expats on this forum, because we know how things work around around here.
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Re: Exchange student from Norway

Postby glober » Fri Jan 21, 2011 9:58 am

Haha, You guys are funny :shock:

This is why I always include the clear line of Subjective Opinion and Relative Points,
making it clear that my experiences, suggestions and personal Truths aren't Absolute
and to be taken with common sense and in context.


So, my personal recommendation to our Norwegian friend:

Take the Official Taxi(s) inside the Airport, They will come up to you and ask if you
want a Taxi, Yes You Do, this may feel annoying and very "hawkis", but they do
no longer allow Taxis in the premises other then the REGISTERED (ie, Safe) Drivers.

It is simple a safety issue and I would recommend you to Take it and pay the hefty
price the first time you come to Peru, especially Lima. I just arrived back 3 weeks
ago and paid 45$ (USD). But for me this is not an issue, I am prepared to pay a price
I find acceptable for the Safety I get and the Practical Issues regarding it. As a note
it is also worth pointing out that I have, and I suspect I am most likely the only one
on the forum as the rest of these lazy buggers would'nt do it (defend yourselfs now)
WALKED to the Airport from Central on occasion, and survived. :lol:


Now, if price is an issue (U.S Dollar is not worth much so its not much money for
you in any case as the Norwegian Crown is strong), the prices change depending on
time of Day, but as they change prices (quite often), simple do not worry about it,
just do not feel stressed or pushes when they come up to you, they are simple asking
if you want a Taxi as they know what options you have, they Are the Best Option,
to try to save a couple of bucks is not worth it as you just arrived, you are tired and
grumpy and you want a good experience.


How should I dress?


Skirt and blouse, Blue Lipstick and a Hat, and do not forget, and this is important,
Boots, Pink ones.......


Could you name one or two songs that most people in Peru would know?


Older generation loves ABBA (spanish album), the new Generation (youth), depending on
genre, Eminem, Ace of Base, Lady Gagga....... (Cheezes I cant believe people listen to
"her").

The same as anywhere else, its not a different planet Kristian, same as you :)
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Re: Exchange student from Norway

Postby Kristian » Fri Jan 21, 2011 10:16 am

Just to have it clear: I have already arranged transportation from the airport to the student dorm I'll be living in. Thanks for help though!

Well, one might get a slight impression that it's another planet from reading up on things that are different from "regular" western culture, like I have. I guess no-one would bother making books or websites that list up all the similarities :P
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Re: Exchange student from Norway

Postby Remigius » Fri Jan 21, 2011 10:33 am

Kristian wrote:Well, one might get a slight impression that it's another planet from reading up on things that are different from "regular" western culture, like I have. I guess no-one would bother making books or websites that list up all the similarities :P


The thing with Lima is that it's a metropolis with over 8 million people and each city (or district as they call it here) has it's own culture. Some districts are so huge, you have sub-cultures within cultures. When you walk through spots in Miraflores and San Isidro, you have the feeling as if you were walking through any European capital, but in La Victoria and certain places in Surquillo you feel as if you were ET who recently climbed out of his saucer.
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Re: Exchange student from Norway

Postby El Tunche » Fri Jan 21, 2011 11:02 am

Popular songs/groups for the peruvian youth

The vast majority, like latin music , like reggaeton, salsa, cumbia, merengue, etc .

The last couple of times that i went to a disco, the most popular ones where

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TaIppY7U3c0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Op0dN_U4L5s

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7zp1TbLFPp8&ob=av3el

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6-Ixi3-MtoI


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FadzTIxXZfY



They listen to "western" music too, but they dont actually dance to it , unless of course , you are in a upper class party , where they like house , techno , etc .
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Re: Exchange student from Norway

Postby amylimena » Fri Jan 21, 2011 11:05 pm

Kristian wrote:

- Could you name one or two songs that most people in Peru would know? I wanna learn a couple of songs to break the ice, so I won't be completely dependant on my beginner spanish.

Thanks again!
- Kristian


Kristian, there are many different types of music here but this radio station will give you a good overview of what you'll commonly hear on buses, in some clubs, etc: http://www.radiopanamericana.com/

There is also a big rock following (both English and Spanish rock). My favorite bar in Lima is Sargento Pimienta...they play Spanish and English rock. They have an online radio: http://www.sargentopimienta.com.pe/

There is a little bit of everything here, it depends which "scene" you prefer!

-Amy
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rama0929
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Re: Exchange student from Norway

Postby rama0929 » Sat Jan 22, 2011 2:35 pm

Kristian wrote:I have a couple of other questions too:

- How should I dress? I've read that people generally dress more formally than I'm used to. According to the weather forecast, it's going to be quite hot: Would a short-sleeved shirt, knee-length shorts (not denim) and sandals be an "acceptable" manner to dress? What about when going out, now that it's hot?

- Could you name one or two songs that most people in Peru would know? I wanna learn a couple of songs to break the ice, so I won't be completely dependant on my beginner spanish.


Your manner of dress shouldn't be a problem. A lot of gals and guys wear denim, from what I can tell. I'd probably recommend sneakers over sandals, but wear whatever you deem comfortable. :)

Usually, the older crowd is a bit more formal, and I got along fine in track pants and tees

As for music, tell everyone you like Grupo 5, and you'll get along fine :lol:
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EyesOfTheWorld
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Re: Exchange student from Norway

Postby EyesOfTheWorld » Sat Jan 22, 2011 7:20 pm

Kristian my friend you will have a good time in Lima, Peru. First week will be kind of crazy, you will get used to it and i guarantee you will love this country.
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