CE in a nutshell

Answers to your qestions about moving to, and living in, Peru,
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Drake
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CE in a nutshell

Postby Drake » Mon May 23, 2011 2:41 pm

Hello, Im a finnish person married to a peruvian and coming to Peru in september. Having my mind focused on moving in to Peru permanently. I found a lot of information about Carnet the Extranjeria = (CE) and we even made several phonecalls to DIGEMIN and my embassy in Peru.
Still not clear to me so lets put it into babysteps for everyone myself included.

1. You arrive in Peru. Your passport will be stamped and you will get a tourist visa automaticly for some months. This information also varies. Some say 3 months some 6. So any clarification for this might be good. According to some sources you need to ask for extented stay in the passport control where they put the stamps.

2. If you want to stay longer you need to go to DIGEMIN "Peruvian Ministry of Foreign affairs" to fill in your resident visa application. You need to pay some licence fees and have your passport with you. You will also need to think what kind of visa you are applying for. Studies, business, marriage etc. So be ready to present those papers too.

3.You need to visit (Interpol) as part of this process of getting your CE. And when they inform you that your papers are ready you go back to Digemin to get your "Cambio de calidad migratoria" which basicly means that you can change your migratory status without leaving the country and re-entering. This is supposed to be a new law to help foreigners to extend their stay but when we called to Digemin this clerk was not aware of this.

4.After being 2 years in the country you can change your visa for immigration visa and try to apply for a citizenship of Peru.

This information is hypotetical dug from various sources..

So how it is really? And how about extending visas?


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Re: CE in a nutshell

Postby Kelly » Mon May 23, 2011 5:44 pm

As far as entering on a tourist visa, the current rule is that you can get up to 183 days. There are no longer any extensions on that. There's usually no problem getting the maximum if you ask nicely, but there is the occasional stick-in-the-mud agent that gives people a hard time.

The rest of your questions should be answered here - Requirements for a CE and here - Going to Interpol

Once you get a resident visa (whether for marriage, work, school..), it used to be necessary to leave the country to get the visa and return with the new stamps in your passport in order to get the Carnet. That step is no longer necessary - it doesn't really have anything to do with allowing foreigners to stay longer. Just helps you avoid that extra travel.
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Re: CE in a nutshell

Postby flytime » Fri May 27, 2011 3:13 pm

I recently got my CE. here is what I did.

Arriving in peru...immigration says how long are you staying. I say 6 months. He writes 180 in my passport, smiles and says 6 months as he hands back my passport.

Going to immigration...I went to the office in Breña Lima. I took a copy of my passport (details page and entry stamp), a copy of the piece of paper I filled out when arriving which immigration also stamp, original and copy of acta matriminio. I got the acta from the whizzbang machine in the food hall of jockey plaza. I can´t remember how much exactly but i got change from 20 soles. A letter of moral and financial guarantee from my wife. Copy of wife´s DNI. Form F004. I went to the 3rd floor, window 8 or 9 and maybe 10 are the windows. They checked the documents. They kept the original of the acta not the copy. Then sent me off to pay for the form004 at the bank downstairs. Did that, returned to the window on the 3rd floor. They took copy of form and stamped it then said go to interpol and return to immigration in 20 days. I arrived at midday and was out by 12.30.

Interpol...Next day..took copy and original of the stamped form and copies of passport. they wanted the copy of the form. I can´t remember if they took the copies of the passport. paid 10 soles for digital photo. Filled out a couple of forms. The woman spoke quickly so i was glad my wife was with me as my spanish wasn´t up to understanding her. I arrived immediately after 4 other people so I had to wait about 15 mins while they got sorted. Gave the forms to another woman who put info in computer then took front and side photos. next, got fingerprinted and dental check. arrived 11am and out by 11.30. nobody arrived after me. If i´d arrived at 11.30 it would have all taken about 10 mins.

return to immigration......I waited 26 days before returning (calender not work days) went to the same window on 3rd floor. gave him the stamped form and said is this ready? He wrote a reference number on the form and said go to window 15 with forms F007 and F007A. I went down to the bank and paid for those 2 forms then took the forms to window 15 (maybe also 16). They went and got a file, took the forms and my passport, put some stuff into the computer and sent me to the 2nd floor. I waited near the doors until they called my name then waited inside the doord until they called my name again. got photographed and fingerprinted then sent to the waiting area along the corridor until they called my name again. Here they gave me my passport and CE. It was all very easy. Arrived at midday and finished at 1.40.

Hope that helps a bit.
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Re: CE in a nutshell

Postby Drake » Fri May 27, 2011 11:36 pm

Thank you for the answers. Sounds good. :D
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Re: CE in a nutshell

Postby mahou123 » Sat May 28, 2011 1:17 am

Drake wrote:
3.You need to visit (Interpol) as part of this process of getting your CE.


I highly recommend going there first and find out what requirements they have for your country. In my case (Australian passport), when they sent me to Interpol from Migraciones, I found out that I had to pay Australian police something like 100 dollars for a check application, and it had to be bank cheque in Aussie dollars. Next few days in Lima, I visited various banks, and found out that it is impossible to buy AUD in Peru and accordingly impossible to make a payment in AUD. Even banks present in Australia and in Peru(Citibank and HSBC) wouldn't do it. So the only solution was to get someone in Australia make a bank cheque and mail it to Peru, which took few days. Then I went to Interpol again, with cheque, they took photos, looked at my teeth, took fingerprints and all, put lots of paperwork in an envelope, sealed it, and gave it to me to send to Australian police. That was it. The funny thing, in about 2 months I got this envelope back, saying they cannot process it (in Australia) because application for Interpol check is filled up incorrectly. At that moment, I already had the CE for 2 months, so I just took the cheque back to Australia and cashed it back. All this leads me to believe that I could even save few soles not sending that envelope anywhere, they don't report anything back to Peru anyway. All this process makes no sense at all. But there is no way around going to Interpol office in Surco to get this application incorrectly produced (needless to say it's all in Spanish, so probably no one read it).
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Re: CE in a nutshell

Postby scott » Sat May 28, 2011 12:37 pm

I visited various banks, and found out that it is impossible to buy AUD in Peru and accordingly impossible to make a payment in AUD.



http://www.pnp.gob.pe/especiales/interpol1/servicios.html

Australianos

Giro Bancario al exterior a favor de “the Australian Federal Police” importe $ 103.00 dólares australianos. Orientación para pago TELF. 61262023333 ó al E-mail [email protected]
Un sobre Manila tamaño oficio
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Re: CE in a nutshell

Postby mahou123 » Sat May 28, 2011 4:14 pm

scott wrote:
I visited various banks, and found out that it is impossible to buy AUD in Peru and accordingly impossible to make a payment in AUD.



http://www.pnp.gob.pe/especiales/interpol1/servicios.html

Australianos

Giro Bancario al exterior a favor de “the Australian Federal Police” importe $ 103.00 dólares australianos. Orientación para pago TELF. 61262023333 ó al E-mail [email protected]
Un sobre Manila tamaño oficio


That is exactly what they tell you at Interpol office in Surco. Very informative and useful, only it is:
A. Wrong. Australian police doesn't accept bank transfers of any kind.
B. Even if it was right, it is impossible to make such payment in Peru. Nor is it possible to produce a bank cheque in AUD.

That's why I'm saying to OP, check out what they have for Finland and how it works in the real life. You should never believe Peruvian officials and what they write on websites.
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Re: CE in a nutshell

Postby chuck » Sat May 28, 2011 11:23 pm

yep, me too, australian - i made a personal cheque for 103 dollars, from australia, and it has never been cashed - had my CE since sept '10.
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Re: CE in a nutshell

Postby agantuk » Mon May 30, 2011 10:14 pm

before you can apply your CE, you have to get your marriage registered. if you got married in peru, some of the steps won't be necessary. if you did not get married in peru, you will need to get your marriage certificate verified at your local peruvian consulate BEFORE you come over to peru.

once you are in peru:

a) Get marriage certificate translated by registered translator.
b) Get the translation legalized (33 soles) by Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores (RREE).
Jr. Ucayali N° 318, Sótano 1, Teléfonos: 204-3337
• This is supposed to take one day. Go early. Documents are accepted between 8:30 AM and 2 PM. • You come back the next day (between 8:15 AM and 4:15 PM) and stand in line to pick it up. Window #6.
c) Then go to RENEIC to register your marriage [if your peruvian husband/wife is a resident of miraflores, you will have to register your marriage at the municipality first and then do the DNI status change (see below) at RENEIC]. This is the form letter you would have to fill in :

---------------------------
Solicitud: Inscripción en el Registro de Peruano por Matrimonio.

Señor Director General de Migraciónes y Naturalización S.D,;

Yo, _________ (name) de nacionalidad ________ (nationality), identificado con ___________ (passport or CE number), domicilado en ________ (address) distrito de ________ (district), provincia de _________ (province), departamento de ________ (department), residente en el país ante Ud. con el debido respeto, me presento y expongo:
Que habiendo contraido matrimonio con _________ (spouse's name) de nacionalidad peruano/a (delete O or A as appropriate), identificado/a (delete O or A as appropriate), con DNI N° _______ (DNI number), y previos los tramites de ley, solicito a Ud. Señor Director, se me inscriba en el registro de peruano por matrimonio de conformidad en lo dispuesto en el árticulo 52° de la constitución política del Perú.

Para dicho efecto acompaño los documentos requeridos que el caso require.

Por tanto: a Ud. Señor Director pido acceder a mi solicitud por ser de justícia.

Place, Date
Your signature
Your name

--------------------------------------------------

• Take your peruvian husband/wife’s DNI, travel documents that shows that you have entered within the last 90 days, your passport (and a photocopy of the passport first page).
• 0-800-11-040 (Phone of RENEIC)
d) While in RENIEC, change your peruvian husband/wife’s DNI status to MARRIED.

then starts the process of applying for the CE.
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Re: CE in a nutshell

Postby TonyLeslie » Tue May 31, 2011 9:52 am

As another Australian, I would like to thank Mahou123 and Chuck from Australia. I was at Interpol yesterday going through the same routine and my wife and I have been wrestling with the payment problem for most of the night. I even rang AFP in Canberra. I also agree with the comment about the lady talking so fast, no one without fluent Spanish would understand half of what she said. Basically the time schedules given to us by Interpol conflict with the time limits given by AFP. I was informed by AFP that a normal Police Check is 15 days and 30 days with the additional check for fingerprints. My experience with post is up to 10-12 days each way (although that is to Hobart)for delivery which puts the whole time frame around a minimum 8 weeks. I have an address for AFP if I use a courier satchel to speed up the process but the they will not use return addressed envelopes or courier satchels and will only use normal post. On the other hand interpol is telling us to go back to Immigration in 20 days, or thereabouts.
You Mahou123 confirmed my thoughts that there was only the two banks who have offices in Australia and you have just saved me the frustration of excess running around for nothing. (I will have to shout you a Cascade one day) so I am about to follow Chucks example and send a personal cheque for $105.00, which is the new rate.
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Re: CE in a nutshell

Postby Jennifer » Tue May 31, 2011 4:45 pm

So, in a nutshell, everyone gets their CdE without the need of the very final paperwork from Interpol coming through? As long as you show that you have the receipt for the paperwork and payment for the check to be done, to the nice people at immigration, they are satisfied?
And each idividual posts off the paperwork to their own country? Is that how it works?
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Re: CE in a nutshell

Postby jcmiro » Tue May 31, 2011 5:41 pm

Same thing for me, an American...I remember (two years ago and change) filling out an FBI back ground check and submitting a check for $20 USD.....20 days later I got my CE......I highly doubt they send those things in....I remember it was fishy because on the request for a criminal record it asked my mailing address to send me the documents and not the interpols address.....Needless to say its probably just a deterrent...
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Re: CE in a nutshell

Postby Kelly » Tue May 31, 2011 8:02 pm

The Interpol check and the FBI check are two different things - and I'm guessing this separate Australian bit is, also.

What the guy at Interpol explained to me about the FBI check was that it has nothing to do with getting your carnet. However, if anything 'bad' comes up with the FBI check, your records will be flagged, and you might be detained next time you try to leave the Peru or enter the US.

It's just a way that your home country has of keeping track of its citizens. :|
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Re: CE in a nutshell

Postby mahou123 » Wed Jun 01, 2011 12:19 am

TonyLeslie wrote:As another Australian, I would like to thank Mahou123 and Chuck from Australia. I was at Interpol yesterday going through the same routine and my wife and I have been wrestling with the payment problem for most of the night. I even rang AFP in Canberra. I also agree with the comment about the lady talking so fast, no one without fluent Spanish would understand half of what she said. Basically the time schedules given to us by Interpol conflict with the time limits given by AFP. I was informed by AFP that a normal Police Check is 15 days and 30 days with the additional check for fingerprints. My experience with post is up to 10-12 days each way (although that is to Hobart)for delivery which puts the whole time frame around a minimum 8 weeks. I have an address for AFP if I use a courier satchel to speed up the process but the they will not use return addressed envelopes or courier satchels and will only use normal post. On the other hand interpol is telling us to go back to Immigration in 20 days, or thereabouts.
You Mahou123 confirmed my thoughts that there was only the two banks who have offices in Australia and you have just saved me the frustration of excess running around for nothing. (I will have to shout you a Cascade one day) so I am about to follow Chucks example and send a personal cheque for $105.00, which is the new rate.


I'm glad my experience was helpful. If they accept your personal cheque, that's fine. I didn't have a cheque book on me, so had to get a bank cheque sent to me from Australia. No bank in Peru would do a cheque, including Citi and HSBC.

But you don't need to wait for reply from AFP at all. Once you do the Interpol thing, they give all the paperwork to you in a sealed envelope, you are supposed to post it, and next day you can get your CE. They didn't check the receipt from the post office, so there was no control over whether I did sent it indeed.

Kelly wrote:What the guy at Interpol explained to me about the FBI check was that it has nothing to do with getting your carnet. However, if anything 'bad' comes up with the FBI check, your records will be flagged, and you might be detained next time you try to leave the Peru or enter the US.


Given that you post all this information to FBI or whoever yourself, any internationally wanted criminal or terrorist hiding in Peru must have worked out that it's better to skip this part of the process (and still get a CE next day).
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Re: CE in a nutshell

Postby Kelly » Wed Jun 01, 2011 7:40 am

Exactly - I don't suppose there's anything that stops someone from just not mailing the form. :/
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Re: CE in a nutshell

Postby MarcoPE » Wed Jun 01, 2011 8:36 am

and this information is only true until the first person that reads this goes into Interpol and says "well, I read on the expat peru forum that 'in a nutshell, everyone gets their CE without the need of the very final paperwork from Interpol coming through'" :lol:
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Re: CE in a nutshell

Postby Kelly » Wed Jun 01, 2011 12:54 pm

Interpol knows that - they're the ones that told me! I don't think they (the people in the office here, anyway) care - the FBI check really doesn't have anything to do with them getting their job done.

When I went to Interpol, it was the most pleasant part of the whole CE experience - the people were friendly, actually answered questions and just made it so easy. We mentioned something about how different it was to the people we had to deal with at Immigration, and the guy laughed and said "yeah, we get that a lot" :lol:
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Re: CE in a nutshell

Postby Amerijewvian3 » Tue Jun 21, 2011 12:24 am

How many days should I generally wait until I return to Immigration to submit the forms: F007 and F007A after filing all my paperwork to Interpol? That is basically where I stand right at this moment, it will be a week Tues. (June 20, 2011) just wanted to ask my specific question as I see so many random personal experiences.
Thanks..
And what fees to be paid, in cash etc. so I am completely prepared to submit all and any final paperwork!
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Apostilla de la Haya

Postby Choripán » Wed Jul 13, 2011 3:40 pm

Does anyone have experience getting a Carnet de Extranjeria through the "profesional" degree category? There are a couple of steps in the process that I don't fully grasp. Specifically, I don't what an "Apostilla de la Haya" is or where to get it.

The DIGEMEN FAQ for the professional CE says you need:

7. Copia fotostática legalizada notarialmente o autenticada por el fedatario de la DIGEMIN de Ia autorización del Colegio Profesional Correspondiente para ejercer la profesión en el Perú o título reconocido por la Asamblea Nacional de Rectores en caso de no existir el Colegio correspondiente.


So I went to the Asamblea Nacional de Rectores (ANR) today to see about getting my University of California degree certified. Here are the key parts of the instruction sheet they gave me:

1. Solicitud dirigida al Presidente de la Asamblea Nacional de Rectores (adjuntar original y copia simple).
2. Diploma Original que acredite el Grado ó Título, con el Sello de la Apostilla de la Haya. Traducción oficial (original y copia legalizada) cuando el título no está en castellano o cuando no sean de habla hispana.
3. Tres copias legalizadas del Grado ó Título, anverso y reverso (tamaño A4).
4. Original y una copia legalizada del Certificado de Estudios, con el sello de la Apostilla de la Haya. Traducción oficial (original y copia legalizada) cuando el certificado no está en castellano.
5. Una copia legalizada de la D.N.I con la última votación o del carné vigente de extranjería, si se trata de un ciudadano extranjero.
6. Dos fotos de frente tamaño pasaporte.
7. Recibo de pago de derechos por la suma de UN MIL CUATROCIENTOS SESENTA Y TRES Y 00/100 NUEVOS SOLES (S/. 1,463.00).


Leaving aside the astronomical fee, there are two things I don't understand about the ANR's certification process:

First, if I am certifying my university degree in order to obtain a CE, how can I present an existing CE to get the certification in the first place (as per step 5)? Does anyone know a work-around to this bureaucratic catch-22?

Second, what is the "Apostilla de la Haya" required in steps (2) and (4)? How do I get one? The person I talked to at ANR said that it was an official government certification of my degree, something that I believe does not exist in the United States. She showed me an example from a file recently submitted by an American with a bachelor's degree in psychology from Florida. The document definitely had the appearance of something official: heavy cotton-bond paper that looked like currency around the edges, a gold seal embossed towards the bottom, and some big signatures and numbers. But otherwise I'm pretty sure it was totally fake, like someone had simply purchased the "official" paper at Office Depot and whipped up something fancy looking to fulfill the process requirements. I could be wrong, but I just don't know.

Does anyone know what an Apostilla de la Haya is and where to get one? The ANR desk sergeant said I had to return to the United States to ask for one directly from the federal government, or visit the US Embassy in Lima for more information. Is this requirement true?

Thanks very much. CP
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Re: CE in a nutshell

Postby Kelly » Wed Jul 13, 2011 4:23 pm

The "Apostille de la Hoya" is the Hague Apostille - you can read about it here: http://www.expatperu.com/legalize-documents.html
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Re: CE in a nutshell

Postby Choripán » Wed Jul 13, 2011 4:29 pm

Kelly wrote:The "Apostille de la Hoya" is the Hague Apostille - you can read about it here: http://www.expatperu.com/legalize-documents.html


Super helpful, Kelly, thanks!
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Re: CE in a nutshell

Postby craig » Fri Jul 15, 2011 5:24 pm

Choripán wrote:Does anyone have experience getting a Carnet de Extranjeria through the "profesional" degree category?

In my experience, that is impossible.

Choripán wrote:First, if I am certifying my university degree in order to obtain a CE, how can I present an existing CE to get the certification in the first place (as per step 5)? Does anyone know a work-around to this bureaucratic catch-22?

There are two cases in which the ANR will recognize foreign degrees.

1) Advanced degrees which are not offered by any Peruvian University.
[CERTIFICACIÓN DE GRADO DE MAESTRO Y/O DOCTOR QUE PERMITA EL EJERCICIO DE LA DOCENCIA UNIVERSITARIA CUANDO EL GRADO QUE FIGURA EN EL DIPLOMA NO OFRECEN LAS UNIVERSIDADES AUTORIZADAS PARA REVALIDAR.]
They will only recognize an advanced degree degree (not a Bachelors) and you must first prove that there is no Peruvian University that grants the degree. If the degree is offered by a Peruvian University they require you to get your degree recognized by a Peruvian University rather than the ANR.

2) A foreign degree obtained in a country with which Peru has a treaty of reciprocity.
[RECONOCIMIENTO DE GRADOS Y/O TÍTULOS OBTENIDOS EN UNIVERSIDADES DE PAISES CON LOS CUALES EL PERÚ TIENE CONVENIOS DE RECIPROCIDAD]
The US does not have a treaty of reciprocity with Peru. So they will not recognize any US degrees. Peru has a treaty with Spain, Brazil and some other countries but probably not with most European countries. [Here is the list from the bottom of your instruction sheet: Argentina, Bulgaria, Bolivia, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Chile, China, Ecuador, El Salvador, España, Guatemala, Honduras, Hungría, México, Nicaragua, Panamá, Paraguay, Rumania, Uruguay, Venezuela, Santa Sede , Ucrania, Rusia y Brasil.]

In both the above cases, it is a requirement that you have a CE before they will accept your application. I talked to the head legal council at ANR and she showed me the Peruvian legislation mandating that they require a CE before recognizing a degree. I also talked to people at the very highest levels of Migraciones. All of them agreed that this was a "circulo vicioso". If you find a way to get around it please let me know.

However, even if you had a CE you should not be able to get ANR to recognize your degree if your degree is from the US and it is either a Bachelors or offered by a Peruvian University.

I am aware that some local schools hire foreigners and arrange for some sort of recognition of their degrees for teaching purposes but I don't understand exactly what this is. I believe that they first get a CE for their teachers as employees. My guess would be that this is something to do with the Ministry of Education and not the ANR and would not be relevant to Migraciones.

In any case, my understanding is that the ANR would not recognize a Bachelors (not an advanced degree) in psychology (offered in Peru) from a US University (no treaty of reciprocity). So I find your report of same puzzling.

Please post anything you learn that is different.
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It is error alone which needs the support of government. Truth can stand by itself. -- Thomas Jefferson
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Re: CE in a nutshell

Postby Tiff » Sun Aug 21, 2011 10:28 am

I'm an Aussie planning to relocate to Arequipa in just over a month & find work teaching English there.

I have a question for TonyLeslie, Chuck & Mahou123 - given the dramas you all had with getting an Aussie cheque, I am wondering if I get my AFP National Police Clearance done here & bring it with me to Peru, do you think that will short circuit things or does the request have to somehow originate via Interpol, Peru?

Two other general queries:

- is there an Interpol in Arequipa that can process the CE application or will I have to travel to Lima?

- I can't seem to find on the forums / other websites any info about how easy it is to qualify for the CE if you are applying on the basis of a workers visa. Is it simply sufficient for me to obtain a job, be able to produce the contract then go through all the various steps (paperwork & payments) outlined on the forums?

Cheers
Tiff
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Re: CE in a nutshell

Postby TonyLeslie » Sun Aug 21, 2011 8:10 pm

G'day Tiff. Ow ya goin. I can only give you limited information from the questions you have asked. Firstly the cheque I used for the payment to the AFP was a personal cheque, because I still have bank accounts in Australia and my cheque book here in Peru. You will not get a Bank in Peru to make out a cheque in Australian Dollars so the short circuit you are looking for would be to have a cheque made out ready before you come if you do not have a personal cheque book with an Australian Bank you can use. I actually ran into a slight problem with the information I was reading here and given to us at Interpol, who suggested they would pass on the record of my visit and information to the Immigration office within 24 hours. However, when I went to the Immigration office 3 days later, we were told that Interpol only passed on information once a week and there were no records at Immigration at that particular point in time of my being at Interpol, (typical public service the world over I think)so therefore I had to return at the completion of a 10 day waiting period.
You will have to go to Interpol regardless, because of what is required for the CE. What confuses people, is the result of the AFP check will come to you and not Interpol and the results you eventually receive back by mail are irrelevant because you can get your CE long before you get the results from the AFP. When you supply all the relevant information to Interpol, they will put it into an envelope, seal it, put an Interpol sticker on it, address it to AFP, then give it to you to mail. I have a slight suspicion that they might contact the AFP separately and have any information about you checked out immediately, because the procedures you have to adhere to here simply do not make sense, but that is only my own speculation.
I cannot help you with anything about Arequipa, because I have never been there at this point in time, but I can tell you that you can get your CE on your Tourist Visa. A warning, when you arrive in Peru, be sure to check that they give you more than 30 days on your passport, because many people are under the impression you will automatically get 90 days as in Chile, Colombia etc, but in Peru, the customs officer can vary that to what ever he wants. You can explain the situation and try and get the maximum 183 days. I got caught and had to fly to Chile and back to get an new tourist visa.
If your Spanish is limited, I suggest you will certainly need someone (local) who speaks Spanish with you when you start the process for your CE, because otherwise you will find it almost impossible to understand all the procedures. Also be prepared to spend a lot of time queueing up. Having said all that, with a little patience(or like me, mostly spent simmering over inefficiencies and all the bloody queues, but my wife is Peruvian and she has enough patience for both of us) you will get through. Just do not try to do everything too quickly, because things in Peru do not work that way. Cheers and good luck with it.
Tiff
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Re: CE in a nutshell

Postby Tiff » Tue Aug 30, 2011 2:59 am

Thanks Tony. That's very helpful. Hopefully the process will be less tortuous with all the forewarning about what to expect. :)
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PaulSal
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Re: CE in a nutshell

Postby PaulSal » Sat Oct 15, 2011 9:42 pm

Drake wrote:Hello, Im a finnish person married to a peruvian and coming to Peru in september. Having my mind focused on moving in to Peru permanently. I found a lot of information about Carnet the Extranjeria = (CE) and we even made several phonecalls to DIGEMIN and my embassy in Peru.
Still not clear to me so lets put it into babysteps for everyone myself included.

1. You arrive in Peru. Your passport will be stamped and you will get a tourist visa automaticly for some months. This information also varies. Some say 3 months some 6. So any clarification for this might be good. According to some sources you need to ask for extented stay in the passport control where they put the stamps.

2. If you want to stay longer you need to go to DIGEMIN "Peruvian Ministry of Foreign affairs" to fill in your resident visa application. You need to pay some licence fees and have your passport with you. You will also need to think what kind of visa you are applying for. Studies, business, marriage etc. So be ready to present those papers too.

3.You need to visit (Interpol) as part of this process of getting your CE. And when they inform you that your papers are ready you go back to Digemin to get your "Cambio de calidad migratoria" which basicly means that you can change your migratory status without leaving the country and re-entering. This is supposed to be a new law to help foreigners to extend their stay but when we called to Digemin this clerk was not aware of this.

4.After being 2 years in the country you can change your visa for immigration visa and try to apply for a citizenship of Peru.

This information is hypotetical dug from various sources..

So how it is really? And how about extending visas?



Question: Is the CE sole intended purpose is for a Work Visa or Permanent Resident Visa?
What about someone who needs a Bank Account in Peru? It's now required to have both a CE and Passport in order to open an account. Why a Bank Account in Peru? Because I want to start a Business in Peru.

Does this sound like a catch 22 Situation? You cant open a Business without 1st having invested at least $25,000 into a Peruvian Bank Account. However, you can't even open an Account without first having the CE?
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fanning
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Re: CE in a nutshell

Postby fanning » Sun Oct 16, 2011 7:12 am

Don't know the details about opening as a private person a bankaccount on a tourist visa. Many on the forum say you can't with new rules, but other seemed to have no problems.

About the Catch 22. There is none. If you intent to get a CE based on investing US$25.000, your investment will be in a company. You need to do the paperwork for opening a company in Peru, and the US$25.000 will be deposited in a bankaccount belonging to that company ( not a personal account ).
Once you registered your company, with the company papers you open a company bankaccount.

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