Becoming Peruvian?

Answers to your qestions about moving to, and living in, Peru,
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uwwgal
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Becoming Peruvian?

Postby uwwgal » Tue May 24, 2011 10:17 am

Hey all,

I know this is a popular topic, but I have a few questions that I haven't found answers to in the archive.

First, I know that after having a CE for 2 years, you can apply to change your status to Migrant. With that, are you able to get a DNI, or is that a completely different tramite?

How long does it take (on average...) and approximately how much does it cost to change the status?

Once the status is changed, do you have to live in Peru to keep that status?

Also, if I don't change my status, and I leave but intend to come back in a year or two, do I still have to surrender my CE? Are there charges for that? How long does that process take?

Thanks so much!


Katie
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Re: Becoming Peruvian?

Postby Remigius » Tue May 24, 2011 10:41 am

uwwgal wrote:Hey all,

I know this is a popular topic, but I have a few questions that I haven't found answers to in the archive.

First, I know that after having a CE for 2 years, you can apply to change your status to Migrant. With that, are you able to get a DNI, or is that a completely different tramite?

How long does it take (on average...) and approximately how much does it cost to change the status?

Once the status is changed, do you have to live in Peru to keep that status?

Also, if I don't change my status, and I leave but intend to come back in a year or two, do I still have to surrender my CE? Are there charges for that? How long does that process take?

Thanks so much!


You can only get your DNI through naturalisation, which you can apply for if you have had your CE for 2 consecutive years. Once you have completed the procedure of naturalisation you have become Peruvian and you receive a document which you can use to get your DNI. Once you have your DNI you can apply for a Peruvian passport. The moment you obtain the Peruvian nationality, you have to give back your CE and you will have to fulfil the same obligations like all other Peruvians, no matter where in the world you are.

If you don't opt for naturalisation and leave the country for more than, I believe 6 months, you have to give back your CE and when you return you'll have to do the whole process again to get a new CE.

I am not up to date when it comes to prices and time, but in my case the process of naturalisation took 2-3 months and for the costs you'd better contact DIGEMIN.
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Re: Becoming Peruvian?

Postby markr » Tue May 24, 2011 11:23 am

Like any other process here, I don't think you can set out a timetable, you just have to it take its natural course.
I've just got my DNI and it took almost 9 months with some ridiculous hitches along the way. At one point I was being told, face to face, at immigration that according to the records I left the country in January 2008 and hadn't re entered, despite the fact that, since that time, I had got married in Lima obtained a CE.
In a nutshell just apply, sit back, do anything and everything that is asked, expect things to go wrong and just laugh when they do.
Good luck.
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Re: Becoming Peruvian?

Postby adrian Thorne » Tue May 24, 2011 11:46 am

uwwgal wrote:Hey all,

I know this is a popular topic, but I have a few questions that I haven't found answers to in the archive.

First, I know that after having a CE for 2 years, you can apply to change your status to Migrant. With that, are you able to get a DNI, or is that a completely different tramite?

How long does it take (on average...) and approximately how much does it cost to change the status?

Once the status is changed, do you have to live in Peru to keep that status?

Also, if I don't change my status, and I leave but intend to come back in a year or two, do I still have to surrender my CE? Are there charges for that? How long does that process take?

Thanks so much!


Katie

I submitted all the documents last Tuesday plus proof of income and my original Birth Certificate in English. Paid The two fees shown on Digemin. They approved my application and my certificate of Naturalization was issued today. I believe they telephoned my employer, Cambridge University to confirm my income prior to approval. I can collect the certificate next tuesday following executive signatures. They will issue six copies at a cost of 11.88 soles, which you can then use to obtain your DNI, passport etc. Mark's advise as always is spot on you surrender the CE on receipt of DNI.
I believe I was very lucky and took along a box of chocolates as a thank you.. Good Luck
Last edited by adrian Thorne on Tue May 24, 2011 11:56 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Becoming Peruvian?

Postby Remigius » Tue May 24, 2011 11:52 am

adrian Thorne wrote: They will issue six copies at a cost of 11.88 soles, which you can then use to obtain your DNI, passport etc


With those copies you can get your DNI, but not your passport. Your passport you can only get with your DNI. Actually, I have not idea why so many copies are issued.
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Re: Becoming Peruvian?

Postby markr » Tue May 24, 2011 12:07 pm

adrian Thorne wrote:
uwwgal wrote:Hey all,

I know this is a popular topic, but I have a few questions that I haven't found answers to in the archive.

First, I know that after having a CE for 2 years, you can apply to change your status to Migrant. With that, are you able to get a DNI, or is that a completely different tramite?

How long does it take (on average...) and approximately how much does it cost to change the status?

Once the status is changed, do you have to live in Peru to keep that status?

Also, if I don't change my status, and I leave but intend to come back in a year or two, do I still have to surrender my CE? Are there charges for that? How long does that process take?

Thanks so much!


Katie

I submitted all the documents last Tuesday plus proof of income and my original Birth Certificate in English. Paid The two fees shown on Digemin. They approved my application and my certificate of Naturalization was issued today. I believe they telephoned my employer, Cambridge University to confirm my income prior to approval. I can collect the certificate next tuesday following executive signatures. They will issue six copies at a cost of 11.88 soles, which you can then use to obtain your DNI, passport etc. Mark's advise as always is spot on you surrender the CE on receipt of DNI.
I believe I was very lucky and took along a box of chocolates as a thank you.. Good Luck


Adrian.
I do hope that you didn't mention the chance of a box of chocolates as you submitted your paperwork. I would be appalled to think that a fellow Brit' has been resorting to bribing government officials.
By the way. They weren't Belgian chocolates were they? :lol:
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adrian Thorne
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Re: Becoming Peruvian?

Postby adrian Thorne » Tue May 24, 2011 12:28 pm

markr wrote:Adrian.
I do hope that you didn't mention the chance of a box of chocolates as you submitted your paperwork. I would be appalled to think that a fellow Brit' has been resorting to bribing government officials.
By the way. They weren't Belgian chocolates were they? :lol:


Just a smile and fresh shave. I originally put the line in to include the details but did not want to have any allogations of affiliation or be told off by the boss.
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Jennifer
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Re: Becoming Peruvian?

Postby Jennifer » Tue May 24, 2011 2:50 pm

Does it matter what type of CE you have i.e marriage/rentista/work.... and for all types of CE, after two years can apply for your naturalisation & then dni and then passport etc? Is this right?
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Re: Becoming Peruvian?

Postby Candy » Tue May 24, 2011 3:13 pm

Jennifer... from what I undertstand it doesn't matter what type of CE you have, as long as you've been here as a legal resident for 2 years. But you DO need to provide proof of income. Apparently it does take waay longer if you are not married to a Peruvian though. Like I posted on the other thread, I was told today in DIGEMIN that when you aren't married, the process could take up to 1 year or even longer and apparently it isn't a sure thing either.
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Re: Becoming Peruvian?

Postby euroman » Tue May 24, 2011 3:17 pm

markr wrote:
adrian Thorne wrote:
uwwgal wrote:Hey all,

I know this is a popular topic, but I have a few questions that I haven't found answers to in the archive.

First, I know that after having a CE for 2 years, you can apply to change your status to Migrant. With that, are you able to get a DNI, or is that a completely different tramite?

How long does it take (on average...) and approximately how much does it cost to change the status?

Once the status is changed, do you have to live in Peru to keep that status?

Also, if I don't change my status, and I leave but intend to come back in a year or two, do I still have to surrender my CE? Are there charges for that? How long does that process take?

Thanks so much!


Katie

I submitted all the documents last Tuesday plus proof of income and my original Birth Certificate in English. Paid The two fees shown on Digemin. They approved my application and my certificate of Naturalization was issued today. I believe they telephoned my employer, Cambridge University to confirm my income prior to approval. I can collect the certificate next tuesday following executive signatures. They will issue six copies at a cost of 11.88 soles, which you can then use to obtain your DNI, passport etc. Mark's advise as always is spot on you surrender the CE on receipt of DNI.
I believe I was very lucky and took along a box of chocolates as a thank you.. Good Luck




Adrian.
I do hope that you didn't mention the chance of a box of chocolates as you submitted your paperwork. I would be appalled to think that a fellow Brit' has been resorting to bribing government officials.
By the way. They weren't Belgian chocolates were they? :lol:


Adrian, you always give comments about people doing things illegally or paying bribes. But when it comes to the point you are paying bribes yourself.

Markr, sure he will get his paperwork if he bribed them with Belgian chocolates.

Belgian chocolates are the best.

http://www.stockfood.co.uk/images-pictu ... 405549.jpg
Last edited by euroman on Tue May 24, 2011 3:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Kelly
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Re: Becoming Peruvian?

Postby Kelly » Tue May 24, 2011 3:19 pm

I'd like to ask that we please stay on topic on these threads. This information is important for many forum readers, but it becomes nearly impossible to find the salient points when have to read between all the flotsam.
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Re: Becoming Peruvian?

Postby euroman » Tue May 24, 2011 3:23 pm

I heard that if you have the nationality from certain countries that if you get the Peruvian nationality that you can loose your original nationality.

Not all countries accept double nationality, so if you are going to have the Peruvian nationality only, it will be tough to travel as Peruvians need a visa for many countries.

It's an important issue to check out.

If you have the Peruvian nationality, you will also have obligations. It will be an obligation to vote when there are elections.
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Re: Becoming Peruvian?

Postby MartitaAQP » Tue May 24, 2011 3:33 pm

Original birth certificate IN ENGLISH?

Are you married to a Peruvian?

I ask because the birth certificate is what is causing a total headache for me in the process right now. I have to have it ordered from the country (had to be new) sent to my family in Florida who have to send it to the consul in Atlanta who has to legalize it, then send back to my family, who will send it to me, and I have to take it to the Ministerio del Exterior to legalize the signature of the consul in Atlanta and then get it translated by a official traductor colegiado, and then taken it with the various signatures and translation to immigrations. About 6 steps for the birth certificate. I begged for a way around this or to process everything else and send this last, but got a no from the very nice person attending me in the office of nacionalizacion in migraciones in Lima.

Martha
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Re: Becoming Peruvian?

Postby johndog » Tue May 24, 2011 9:51 pm

congrats Adrian !
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adrian Thorne
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Re: Becoming Peruvian?

Postby adrian Thorne » Tue May 24, 2011 10:59 pm

MartitaAQP wrote:Original birth certificate IN ENGLISH?

Are you married to a Peruvian?

I ask because the birth certificate is what is causing a total headache for me in the process right now. I have to have it ordered from the country (had to be new) sent to my family in Florida who have to send it to the consul in Atlanta who has to legalize it, then send back to my family, who will send it to me, and I have to take it to the Ministerio del Exterior to legalize the signature of the consul in Atlanta and then get it translated by a official traductor colegiado, and then taken it with the various signatures and translation to immigrations. About 6 steps for the birth certificate. I begged for a way around this or to process everything else and send this last, but got a no from the very nice person attending me in the office of nacionalizacion in migraciones in Lima.

Martha



Martha it may be different in the UK. I contacted a Notary in my home town and for a fee, ordered Birth Certificate. Notarised, sent by courier to Overseas House, who legalised it. It was then passed on to the Peruvian Consulate who stamped it and returned by the courier same day to the notary. She then sent it on to me. Total time 5 days. The cost for this service was in the region of $150 US.


John Thank you.
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Re: Becoming Peruvian?

Postby Ruud » Tue May 24, 2011 11:12 pm

Interesting.
This sounds like the 'old' legalizing procedure.

As of the end of last year, documents (like a birth certificate) need only to have an apostille seal provided by your home authority. And because of that should accepted by the peruvian authorities, without the need passing to the consul, ministerios etc.

For a fact I know the peruvians are providing apostille documents for abroad, so I expect them also accepting them.
This procedure is much easier, less time consuming and probably cheaper, because you pay for 1 seal only.

Ruud



adrian Thorne wrote:
MartitaAQP wrote:Original birth certificate IN ENGLISH?

Are you married to a Peruvian?

I ask because the birth certificate is what is causing a total headache for me in the process right now. I have to have it ordered from the country (had to be new) sent to my family in Florida who have to send it to the consul in Atlanta who has to legalize it, then send back to my family, who will send it to me, and I have to take it to the Ministerio del Exterior to legalize the signature of the consul in Atlanta and then get it translated by a official traductor colegiado, and then taken it with the various signatures and translation to immigrations. About 6 steps for the birth certificate. I begged for a way around this or to process everything else and send this last, but got a no from the very nice person attending me in the office of nacionalizacion in migraciones in Lima.

Martha



Martha it may be different in the UK. I contacted a Notary in my home town and for a fee, ordered Birth Certificate. Notarised, sent by courier to Overseas House, who legalised it. It was then passed on to the Peruvian Consulate who stamped it and returned by the courier same day to the notary. She then sent it on to me. Total time 5 days. The cost for this service was in the region of $150 US.


John Thank you.
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Re: Becoming Peruvian?

Postby chuck » Tue May 24, 2011 11:25 pm

Ruud wrote:Interesting.
This sounds like the 'old' legalizing procedure.

As of the end of last year, documents (like a birth certificate) need only to have an apostille seal provided by your home authority. And because of that should accepted by the peruvian authorities, without the need passing to the consul, ministerios etc.

For a fact I know the peruvians are providing apostille documents for abroad, so I expect them also accepting them.
This procedure is much easier, less time consuming and probably cheaper, because you pay for 1 seal only.

Ruud



yes, this is what i have done - i am australian and was told i only need the apostile stamp from australia. When i was last in Sydney i received my birth certificate apostilled, and my 'single status certificate'. I am planning to get married with a beautiful peruvian girl in august
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Re: Becoming Peruvian?

Postby MartitaAQP » Wed May 25, 2011 3:07 pm

While the apostille is an option as an alternative to the consulate, it costs MORE (in the US) and it still requires the ministerio del exterior stamp and official translation. In other words, the two options were identical with only the only difference being the cost. For a birth certificate, the notary is not required if you get the information of the original register of deeds (in the US, once again). For other documents, the apostille might be easier than the notary if you don't have access to go to one of the notary's that are pre-approved (near the consulate). In my case, I would have to physically drive across the country to do this. THe other option (for non birth cert legalizatoins) is to get any notary to do it and then get the copy from the state of the notary's registration (legalize the legalizer)....what a nightmare.
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Re: Becoming Peruvian?

Postby MarcoPE » Wed May 25, 2011 3:39 pm

MartitaAQP wrote:While the apostille is an option as an alternative to the consulate, it costs MORE (in the US) and it still requires the ministerio del exterior stamp and official translation.


I am a little confused, so please forgive me if I misunderstood. I had all my documents done prior to the Apostille law, so I had to have everything notarized and legalized by the Peru Consulate (if the consulate doesn't have the notary signature on file)...but the consulate charges $30.00 per legalization which is significantly higher than what the states (at least the ones I looked at) charge for an Apostille...Florida is $10.00, $15.00 in Texas and $6.00 in Massachusetts. All apostilles in the US are issued by each states' Secretary of State office.

A note too: it is also my understanding that the apostille is only good for public documents issued by a state entity (birth/death records, etc); documents issued by a county clerk, etc.. still have to go through the notarization procedure and then to the Secretary of State for authentication and issuance of the apostille.

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