Need Advice...moving to Lima

Answers to your qestions about moving to, and living in, Peru,
conniejohn
Member
Member
Posts: 6
Joined: Fri Dec 23, 2011 10:07 am

Need Advice...moving to Lima

Postby conniejohn » Sat Dec 24, 2011 3:28 am

Looking forward to moving to Lima sometime in February and have a few questions...hope I can get some answers...My husband will be working near the intersection of Javier Prado Este and Panamenicana Sur close to the Los Inkas Golf Club and we are wondering where we should look for a safe place to live...I will be staying home without a vehicle and would like to live close to cafes and shops.....we also want to know if we should bring any of our furniture.....we want to bring our bedroom set because of our excellent comfy mattress but we see that most apts are fully furnished...we will also need temporary housing until we find a permanent place to live...will need to take taxi until we can buy a vehicle...any recommendations for taxi service and buying a car....any advice or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.....thanks....a safe and happy holiday to all...connie


User avatar
rama0929
Gold Member
Gold Member
Posts: 1572
Joined: Wed Feb 10, 2010 8:43 am
Contact:

Re: Need Advice...moving to Lima

Postby rama0929 » Sat Dec 24, 2011 9:05 pm

conniejohn wrote:Looking forward to moving to Lima sometime in February and have a few questions...hope I can get some answers...My husband will be working near the intersection of Javier Prado Este and Panamenicana Sur close to the Los Inkas Golf Club and we are wondering where we should look for a safe place to live...I will be staying home without a vehicle and would like to live close to cafes and shops.....we also want to know if we should bring any of our furniture.....we want to bring our bedroom set because of our excellent comfy mattress but we see that most apts are fully furnished...we will also need temporary housing until we find a permanent place to live...will need to take taxi until we can buy a vehicle...any recommendations for taxi service and buying a car....any advice or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.....thanks....a safe and happy holiday to all...connie


Check fanning for housing, and Kelly for the taxis. Also, there is a "Services in Lima" section that you may want to check out that should also help with some leads.
User avatar
Omikron
Gold Member
Gold Member
Posts: 366
Joined: Sat Mar 10, 2007 9:13 pm
Location: Lima (I'm a local)

Re: Need Advice...moving to Lima

Postby Omikron » Sat Dec 24, 2011 9:49 pm

I've lived in "La Encalada" Avenue for 4 years, which is in Surco district in an area called Monterrico. The USA embassy is located here. I didn't own a car either and I called this area "Little Miraflores" as I had banks, restaurants and malls pretty close to me, some within walking distance. It is far from Downtown Miraflores though (30-40 minutes by combi) so I kinda felt that although I had everything close to me, I lived in my own world as most social meetings happened in Miraflores.

Malls close to La Encalada ordered by Distance from closest to farthest:
El Polo (right in front of the USA embassy) Jockey Plaza (5 mins by combi), Caminos del Inca (8 mins by combi), Primavera. All of them but El Polo have cinema theaters

You can do your grocery shopping at Vivanda or San Fernando, both supermarkets on La Encalada itself and there is even a "mercado", which is like a market with several vendors in booths.
User avatar
chi chi
Gold Member
Gold Member
Posts: 6060
Joined: Tue Dec 06, 2011 5:28 pm
Location: Granada, Andalusia

Re: Need Advice...moving to Lima

Postby chi chi » Sun Dec 25, 2011 3:52 pm

For appartments look at www.elcomercio.pe

Furnished appartment are overpriced as the owners are aiming at gringos and consequently charge gringo prices. Also flats advertised on english speaking website are mostly more expensive too as the landlords are aiming at 'new in town' gringos.
Affordable flats can be found in the area you are moving too but when you encounter a flat you like don't be scared to haggle about the price. As a gringo you can often get a better price as landlords will consider you a more reliable tenant and prefer to rent to you.

Before signing a contract, read it at least 25 times and if there's anything you don't like in the contract, get it changed. Never do verbal agreements. They have no value at all in Peru and will work in your disadvantage if problems arise.

If you spanish isn't excellent then take preferably a Peruvian friend with you to check out the contract for you. Especially, who pays for water, electricity, arbitrios MUST be put in the contract. Be prepared, if landlords can scam you, they will scam you. And check out if water and electricity meters are individual. Often people pay without knowing the electricity or water of the neigboors as well.

NEVER sign a contract for a flat that's still occupied. It happens many times that the current tenant moves out later or not at all.

Before signing a contract make sure that the person who wants to rent out the flat to you is the owner of the flat. Ask for his or her DNI and titulo de propriedad.

It's a common scam that people try to rent out a flat that doesn't belong to them. It happened that tenants before moving out of a rented flat, advertised the flat for rent. Take deposits and one months rent in advance from several people and then bugger off.
Be especially carefull with flats that are advertised at a much lower price than similar flats in the area. Scammers do this as they can get a lot of interest for the flat and subsequently take a lot of deposits and months rent in advance in a short time.
And professional scammers are not the ones with scares on their faces, ripped jeans and worn out leather jacket, their arms full of tattoos and a joint in their mouth. They generally wear nice suits and are very friendly.

Golden rule: normally you are required to pay one month deposit. At the end of the contract, don't pay the last months rent and tell the owner that he has to take the deposit in lieu of the last months rent. It happens so many times that landlords don't return deposits as they 'invent' damages or other costs.


Furniture can be bought cheaply at La zona industrial in Villa El Salvador. You buy there furniture at whole sale prices. Most stores in other parts of Lima buy their furniture up there too.
For white goods like fridges, cookers, washing machines, tv's etc. I suggest stores like Tottus, Hiraoka, Ripley, Sagafabella, La Curacao. Especially around bank holiday and now around christmas, there are special deals to be done.

Taxis? Most people take the bus. In the beginning the bus system looks chaotic but after using it for some time you got the grips of using it. Taxis can be very expensive in Lima. Because taxi drivers will charge you the gringo rate.
User avatar
americorps
Gold Member
Gold Member
Posts: 3841
Joined: Tue Dec 12, 2006 4:16 pm
Location: Lima

Re: Need Advice...moving to Lima

Postby americorps » Sun Dec 25, 2011 6:02 pm

A few things to realize before renting an apartment here is that they do NOT always include appliance such as hot water heaters, refrigerators and stoves and sometimes they do not even include light fixtures. That will vary from apt to apt, but do not be surprised.

You are generally liable to return the apartment in the condition in which it was rented, meaning you are not only liable for normal wear and tear, but also for things that are not always your fault like a leaky pipe or running toilet.

There are arbitrios it is a property tax. there are also property taxes. Generally the landlord must pay the regular property taxes but the arbitrios, which is really more for city services is generally paid by the renter, not always but usually. Find out what they are, but they are generally cheap, less than $150 a year and sometimes cheaper if you pay the year in advance.

As far as Chi Chi's advice, while his comments on apartments in this case is right on, his other comments omits thing you might find important.

Riders and workers on Public Transportation report a higher than average problems with asthma and respritory illness. More people, per capita, are killed or injured on public transportation and bus lines in Peru than in any other Latin American country and crime on public transport is higher than in many other countries. I am not saying it is unridable as I use it myself quite often, but do not confuse what Chi Chi says to think it is always a pleasant option.

There is a thread here about the cost of living in Peru that you will find very helpful. I am afraid it is long and has several off-topic tangents, but if you take the time, I am sure you will find most of your questions answered there. viewtopic.php?f=1&t=94

You need to set your budget as to how much you want to spend on an apartment instead of figure out what the local prices are, then hunt accordingly. You can find things in miraflores and san isidro for anywhere between 350-2000 USD a month

Just a little ways away, you can go to Surquillo and find it much less and Surquillo has good streets and bad streets, so you need to sort of shop around.

other areas you can consider could include barranco, San Borja, and Santiago de Surco without moving too far out of the way. Those are generally considered safer areas and prices vary according to specific area. There are tons of temporary flats that range from 400 - 700 USD a month in Miraflores right where you will be working. If you go a little farther out, you can lower that.

With the ranges I listed above, the majority will be closer to the middle. I would say an average 1 bedroom apartment in miraflores or san isidro is 550 dollars more or less, surquillo 400 dollars more or less. If you are willing to live a little farther or in an in-between area you could probably save some money, if you want an ocean view, you best be prepared to look at the 700-1500 range.

If you are willing to commute, you could save more money on housing with a compromise of commuting time and costs and a certain level of safety though there are many moderate neighborhood that are not unsafe.

Someone could easily come along and offer you figures that differ from mine, some will be higher, besides chi chi, not many will be lower.

I have a friend who rents small furnished flats in San Borja for $400 a month that are safe and reliable, but from where you will be working, it would require 2 buses or about 10 Soles in Taxi to get there and during rush hour, about 35 minutes. If you are interested, send me a private message.

Good luck.
User avatar
chi chi
Gold Member
Gold Member
Posts: 6060
Joined: Tue Dec 06, 2011 5:28 pm
Location: Granada, Andalusia

Re: Need Advice...moving to Lima

Postby chi chi » Sun Dec 25, 2011 7:49 pm

americorps wrote:Riders and workers on Public Transportation report a higher than average problems with asthma and respritory illness. More people, per capita, are killed or injured on public transportation and bus lines in Peru than in any other Latin American country and crime on public transport is higher than in many other countries. I am not saying it is unridable as I use it myself quite often, but do not confuse what Chi Chi says to think it is always a pleasant option.


I don't think there's a difference in risk of getting asthma and respiratory between people who take public transport and people who take taxi's, walk or travel by bicycle in Lima. The whole Lima is contaminated.

OK, I am agree, most busses are wrecks. Especially those combis. But you can choose. Every few minutes or seconds there are busses going in all directions. When I take the bus in Lima, I wait till one of the newer, bigger and cleaner busses arrive. Especially, if I have to travel a long distance. I don't like combis. They are overcrowded, dirty and many drivers drive dangerously.

I have to say that I feel safer in the newer and bigger busses or those big ex-american schoolbusses than travelling in a 20 year old smelly taxi with often holes in the floor and a driver who's continiously touching his radio to look for his favourite radio station, calling on his cellphone or looking and whistling at girls.

If a taxi collides with one of those ex-american schoolbusses. I'd rather be in the last one.
User avatar
chi chi
Gold Member
Gold Member
Posts: 6060
Joined: Tue Dec 06, 2011 5:28 pm
Location: Granada, Andalusia

Re: Need Advice...moving to Lima

Postby chi chi » Sun Dec 25, 2011 8:18 pm

Some other advice when renting a flat:

Check that water and electricity is connected and running. If it isn't then for sure the owner will not pay for it. If it has been disconnected due to non payment. Then the debt + a penalty has to be paid. ...normally by you.

When negotiating the price, don't show to be too interested. Don't get too exited. If the owner notices that you really like the flat then it will be harder to negotiate a lower price. Always say, that you just visited a similar flat that looked a bit nicer at a lower rate.

ALWAYS GET A RECEIPT FOR RENT AND DEPOSIT PAID!!!

Like I mentioned before, make sure that the person who wants to rent out the flat to you is the owner. Ask for his DNI and titelo de propriedad. And ask for a copy of it.

Negotiate a much lower price, when the owner says no, then walk away. He will chase you and come up with a better offer.

If someone knocks the door and says he's from an electricity company or water company. Then they must carry an ID. If in doubt call that company and ask if they sendet someone to your home.

Before, you visit a flat, have a look around in the area at both day and nighttime. Some areas are nice during the day but the scene can change at nighttime. Most people are out for work during the day but in the evening, the love to blast music at maximum volume and have loud parties all night. Unless you are a party animal yourself, you don't want to live next door.

CHANGE THE LOCKS. It happens that previous tenants made a copy of the key and come back 'for a visit'.

Never trust the doormen, vigilante, security guard in the building or the watchimen in the street. Often they inform criminals about what valuables they see people carrying to their flats or inform criminals about what times you are away.

If you install cable TV or internet, check the cables regularly. It happens that people steal internet or cable TV from each other by making an extension.
User avatar
americorps
Gold Member
Gold Member
Posts: 3841
Joined: Tue Dec 12, 2006 4:16 pm
Location: Lima

Re: Need Advice...moving to Lima

Postby americorps » Sun Dec 25, 2011 8:42 pm

chi chi wrote:
I don't think there's a difference in risk of getting asthma and respiratory between people who take public transport and people who take taxi's, walk or travel by bicycle in Lima. The whole Lima is contaminated.


The study presented by the world health organization in Lima does not agree with what you think.
User avatar
chi chi
Gold Member
Gold Member
Posts: 6060
Joined: Tue Dec 06, 2011 5:28 pm
Location: Granada, Andalusia

Re: Need Advice...moving to Lima

Postby chi chi » Sun Dec 25, 2011 8:58 pm

americorps wrote:
chi chi wrote:
I don't think there's a difference in risk of getting asthma and respiratory between people who take public transport and people who take taxi's, walk or travel by bicycle in Lima. The whole Lima is contaminated.


The study presented by the world health organization in Lima does not agree with what you think.


That's OK then. But I'd rather sit inside the bus than driving on my bicyle behind it when the exhaust of the bus is blowing into my face.
User avatar
Kelly
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 3871
Joined: Fri Mar 11, 2005 9:28 pm
Location: Lima, Peru
Contact:

Re: Need Advice...moving to Lima

Postby Kelly » Sun Dec 25, 2011 10:44 pm

Keep it on topic, please.
User avatar
chi chi
Gold Member
Gold Member
Posts: 6060
Joined: Tue Dec 06, 2011 5:28 pm
Location: Granada, Andalusia

Re: Need Advice...moving to Lima

Postby chi chi » Mon Dec 26, 2011 3:07 pm

Omikron wrote:You can do your grocery shopping at Vivanda
there is even a "mercado", which is like a market with several vendors in booths.


I suggest you go to the market.

Vivanda is VERY, VERY expensive.
conniejohn
Member
Member
Posts: 6
Joined: Fri Dec 23, 2011 10:07 am

Re: Need Advice...moving to Lima

Postby conniejohn » Thu Mar 01, 2012 5:33 pm

Hello everyone... Connie and I are moving to Peru. I've been informed by my new employer that I can arrive before my work visa is completed, but I must leave the country (approximately 45 days later) and reenter to obtain the work visa. My employer tells me that Connie may join me when I return. Our question is can Connie enter the country before I obtain my work visa and remain in Peru while I leave the country for the work visa process?

I would appreciate a prompt reply as I would like to book the tickets today!

Thank you,

John
RICHARDandNORA
Gold Member
Gold Member
Posts: 164
Joined: Thu Jan 13, 2011 2:17 pm

Re: Need Advice...moving to Lima

Postby RICHARDandNORA » Thu Mar 01, 2012 6:07 pm

John, Connie will be viewed separately from you. If desired, upon arrival at Jorge Chavez Airport, she (and you) can request a 183 day visa and be completely legal for that period. She can leave with you and re-enter (for another 183 day period) with no problem or stay in Peru and await your return. All this is very easily arranged. If you intend to live in Peru for a long period or permanently, there are other arrangements that can be made. Good luck......richard
conniejohn
Member
Member
Posts: 6
Joined: Fri Dec 23, 2011 10:07 am

Re: Need Advice...moving to Lima

Postby conniejohn » Thu Mar 01, 2012 6:14 pm

Richard,

Thank you for the prompt reply. I just recieved word from my new employer that Connie can enter with me, but she also must leave the country and reenter with me to obtain my work visa. At that time, she will also recieve a long term visa.

Thanks,

John
RICHARDandNORA
Gold Member
Gold Member
Posts: 164
Joined: Thu Jan 13, 2011 2:17 pm

Re: Need Advice...moving to Lima

Postby RICHARDandNORA » Thu Mar 01, 2012 6:24 pm

Yes John, when anyone changes their status, they must leave and return. When I changed my status, I just traveled to the Peruvian/Chilian border and immediately returned to Lima. If I remember correctly, within the last year or so, there are some circumstances that do not require even exiting Peru. I just do not remember which cases they are........richard
User avatar
chi chi
Gold Member
Gold Member
Posts: 6060
Joined: Tue Dec 06, 2011 5:28 pm
Location: Granada, Andalusia

Re: Need Advice...moving to Lima

Postby chi chi » Thu Mar 01, 2012 9:43 pm

americorps wrote:Riders and workers on Public Transportation report a higher than average problems with asthma and respritory illness. More people, per capita, are killed or injured on public transportation and bus lines in Peru than in any other Latin American country and crime on public transport is higher than in many other countries. I am not saying it is unridable as I use it myself quite often, but do not confuse what Chi Chi says to think it is always a pleasant option.


The new metropolitana and electric train are new and probably the best public transport system in the world.
They serve all the areas where most people live.
Train, buses and stations have all security cameras and security staff. You pay with an uploadable card. Every 5 minutes, there´s a train or bus so you never have to wait long.

Fare is 1.50 soles for a ride. Any distance.
conniejohn
Member
Member
Posts: 6
Joined: Fri Dec 23, 2011 10:07 am

Re: Need Advice...moving to Lima

Postby conniejohn » Wed Mar 14, 2012 8:46 pm

I have arrived in Lima and have started my search for an apartment to rent. I've seen a few acceptable places in La Molina. I'm so ready to move out of this hotel room!

Connie is in NY awaiting our household shipment from Cairo, Egypt, which is expected this Friday. It is our responsibility to select an international mover to relocate our belongings.

Can anyone offer advice on a reputable international moving service from the states, specifically NY Bronx area, to Lima, Peru?

Thanks,

John

Return to “Expat Information”

Login  •  Register