A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Answers to your qestions about moving to, and living in, Peru,
bgreenman
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A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby bgreenman » Tue Oct 30, 2012 11:04 am

So I am currently in the process of obtaining Peruvian citizenship by naturalization—NOT due to marriage or Peruvian Parents. I have combed through the different forum posts, and while some of the information offered was helpful, none of the posts fit my exact situation. I have spent a lot of time researching and asking questions at Migraciones, and I believe it has paid off. I have not yet finished the process, but I am well along, and I would like to share my progress thus far. Perhaps in the future I will write another update detailing the end of the process.

When I started this process, the first thing I wanted to make sure of is that I would not lose my American citizenship. I called the US Embassy here in Peru, and they assured me that under no circumstances will this cause me to lose my American citizenship. While according to US law, obtaining naturalization in a foreign state is a potentially expatriating act, you will only lose your citizenship if you expressly intend to do so. If there is no intention to relinquish citizenship, then there is no problem. You can read more on the State Department’s website (http://travel.state.gov/law/citizenship/citizenship_778.html). Obviously, if you are not from the US, then you will have to research your own country’s laws.

There was a time when Peru required you to expressly renounce your other citizenship in order to naturalize as a Peruvian citizen, but the laws changed in 2006, and that requirement was abolished.

If you were wondering, I currently live here in Peru on a Non-Catholic Religious Visa. That is a fancy way of saying that I work in partnership with an evangelical mission here in Peru. I am choosing to take Peruvian citizenship, and I am not married to a Peruvian.

First off, here are the requirements that qualify you to be able to request citizenship through naturalization:

- Express a desire to obtain Peruvian citizenship.
- Be an adult (at least 18 years old).
- Have resided legally in Peru for at least two consecutive years. (Note, that this does not mean that you cannot set foot outside of the country for two years. It means that you have to have held a Carnet de Extranjeria for that amount of time. To maintain a valid Carnet de Extranjeria, you must not spend more than six months of the year outside of the country, and you have to pay the yearly fees to maintain the visa. You also have to meet other requirements depending on the type of visa that you apply for. In my case, I needed to work full time with my mission, and they needed to request the visa on my behalf. On a religious visa, I am not allowed to earn a salary from within Peru. I need to have a foreign source of income).
- Regularly exercise a profession, art, office, business activity, and/or be an investor.
- Have no criminal record and generally good conduct.
- Demonstrate economic solvency that proves that you can live as an independent without putting a strain on public order. (This seems to be quite subjective, but the immigrations officer that I spoke with said that they usually look for a minimum of $1000 per month regular income).
- Demonstrate a strong grasp of the Spanish language and Peruvian history, geography, culture, and current events (this will be tested).

In order to begin the process, I was required to present a number of documents at the naturalization office in the immigrations building. The office is on the far right hand side of the third floor as you are coming up the main stair case, and they only provide personal attention Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 8:30am until 1:00pm. Here is a list of the documents that I had to provide along with a list of how to get them:

- A receipt from Banco de la Nacion of S/. 54.25 as an application fee (derecho de tramite)
- DIGEMIN Form F-006 (http://www.digemin.gob.pe/formularios/f-006.pdf) which you can print from the internet or pick up for free at Migraciones. You will need to check the box “Adquisicion de la naturalizacion.” It also asks for your personal information as well as a brief reasoning of why you are seeing naturalization.
- A hand written letter to the President of Peru according to the established model. This step was a little bit difficult because I could not find the established model anywhere. I searched online, but couldn’t find the information anywhere. I called Migraciones, and they told me that they had a model letter, but I had to personally go and get it. It turns out that the only model letter that they were able to show me was hanging on a wall in a busy hallway. It isn’t a short letter either. I had to stand there and copy each word from the model hanging on the wall. Unfortunately, I turned it in already, and I forgot to keep a copy of the model to share with others. You will have to go there in person and inquire for yourself. It is not a short letter. I filled two blank pages completely.

***UPDATED December 4, 2012***
Thanks to Lon, we now do have a model for the letter that needs to be hand written to the president. You can find it at the following site (You will need to copy and paste this address into your web browser. I have used the maximum number of hyperlinks for this post, so I cannot hyperlink it directly):

12degreessouth.com/downloads/model-letter-to-president.pdf

- An original copy of your birth certificate legalized by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs here in Peru (Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriors). There are a number of steps one has to go through before a US birth certificate can be legalized here in Peru. First, you have to get an original copy of your birth certificate apostilled. The idea of an apostille was born from an international convention where a number of countries agreed upon a common format by which they would accept legalized documents from abroad. Wherever you go to get an apostille, it will have the same basic format. Both the US and Peru are a part of the treaty. Note that the wording that Migraciones will provide you is a bit confusing. They tell you that the birth certificate first has to be legalized by the consular authority in your country of birth and then by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs here in Peru. Before Peru joined the Hague Treaty about apostilles, that meant that you had to go to the Peruvian consulate closest to your place of birth and have them legalize your birth certificate. Now the Secretary of State’s apostille counts as the consular authority. You do NOT have to take the birth certificate to the Peruvian consulate in the US. Below I outline the entire process of legalizing the birth certificate:

1. First, you have to obtain an original copy of your birth certificate from the state in which you were born.
2. In each state, the Secretary of State’s office is responsible for doing apostilles. You will have to research the process for your state. In Michigan, my mom was close enough to a Secretary of State’s office that she just took the document in person. It took about five minutes and cost only $1.
3. Once the document is apostilled, it is time to bring it down to Peru. Because the original document is not in Spanish, you have to get it officially translated. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs has a list of approved official translators (Traductores Publicos Juramentados) on their website (http://www.rree.gob.pe/portal/traducto.nsf/webtraduc?OpenForm). I didn’t spend a ton of time comparing prices, but I chose a translator who is quite close to where I live. I brought it to her office, and she had it all done for me in about two days. The cost of the translation was about S/. 80.
4. After getting it officially translated, you can finally take it to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to get it legalized. There are two places that I know of in Lima where they will do legalizations for you—either in their main offices in the center of Lima or at the MAC Center in Plaza Lima Norte. I personally recommend doing it at the MAC Center where it only takes a couple of hours, and they are open longer hours every day of the week. In the center of Lima the process takes a day or two, and the hours are more limited. All I had to do was show up at the MAC center with a receipt from Interbank for S/. 23.50 which paid for the legalization. I turned my birth certificate over to them, and they had it ready about two hours later. Once legalized by them, the birth certificate is ready to be turned into Migraciones.

- A simple photo copy of both sides of your Carnet de Extranjeria. You have to be up to date on your yearly payments.
- A certification of your migratory movements (Certificado de Movimiento Migratorio). This is another document that you will have to get from Migraciones. In order to do so, you need to fill out Form F-003 (http://www.digemin.gob.pe/formularios/f-003.pdf) which can either be printed from the internet or picked up for free at the Migraciones office. You will also need to bring your original Carnet de Extranjeria and your Passport as well as copies of each document. Lastly, you need a receipt for S/. 19.60 from the Banco de la Nacion to pay for the document. Once you have all of that, you go to the first floor of the Migraciones office. About half way back towards the left on the first floor there is a hall that leads to a patio. This is where you will need to wait in line to get your Certificado. The process is only supposed to take an hour or two, but I ended up having to come back the next day. I recommend going early in the morning to avoid having to come back. The office is only open Monday through Friday from 8:30am until 1:00pm.
- A copy of your passport legalized by any Peruvian notary. This should not cost more than S/. 10. All you have to do is go to a notary office with your original passport and copy and ask them to legalize it.
- A sworn statement of health, legal address, and promise of no criminal record according to the established model: (http://www.digemin.gob.pe/documentos/declaracionjurada.doc). Your signature has to be legalized by a Peruvian notary. This might cost slightly more than what it did to legalize the copy of your passport, but still right around S/. 10. You will need to show your Carnet de Extranjeria to the notary to be able to legalize your signature.
- As someone who was here on a Non-Catholic Religious Visa, I had to also provide a document written on my mission’s letterhead and signed by the director of the mission stating that I had been working with them for more than two years. This document then had to be legalized by the Interconfessional Affairs office (Asuntos Interconfesionales) at the Peruvian Ministerio de Justicia, a process which took about two days. Note that in order to have this document legalized, your congregation or mission has to be registered with the Ministerio de Justicia. If you are in Peru under some other type of visa, then the documentation required will be different. I believe people on work visas have to provide their contract, but it would be best to inquire at the naturalization office to know exactly what you need for your specific situation.
- Documentation proving economic solvency. This will be different for each person, but they told me that I needed to show a monthly income of at least $1000. This was particularly difficult for me because I cannot have any Peruvian income while on a religious visa. The only income that I have is in the States, and it is deposited into a US bank account. In order to show that here, I had to have my mission headquarters in Miami notarize one of my monthly earnings statements and then send it off to Tallahassee to get apostilled by the Florida Secretary of State. They then sent it down to Peru where I had to get it officially translated and legalized by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (exactly the same process as I described for my birth certificate above). I also had to provide Peruvian and American bank statements to show how my money arrived in Peru from the US. I believe that this process is much easier if you are here on a work visa. All you would have to do is show your Peruvian pay statements that are given to you by your employer.
- Four passport sized photos of your face with a white background.

Once you have all of those documents together, you must then take them to the Naturalization office on the third floor of Migracones. Remember they are only open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 8:30am until 1:00pm. If everything is up to par, then they will create a file for you and they will officially begin the naturalization process. In a couple of weeks, if they verify that you have provided all of the proper documentation, then they will send a notification to your home address asking you to come to take the nationality test. The test is given at 3:00pm at the Migraciones office on the last Friday of every month. Make sure that you bring your letter of notification with you because the offices are closed to the public after 1:00pm. The letter is your permission to enter.

There is little to no information about the test, and that was frustrating to me as I was trying to study. All they will tell you is that it is a 10 question test that covers Peruvian history, geography, civil education, culture, and current events. In order to pass the test, you need to score an 11 on a 20 point scale. If you do not pass the first time, you can retake the test, but they vary the questions. None of the questions are multiple choice. My test included questions about important dates in Peruvian history like Independence Day, and the Combate de Angamos. It asked about Peruvian authors, names of coastal rivers, and border countries. I also had to write out one of the verses of the national anthem. You must take the test in Spanish. If you don’t speak Spanish, then you cannot pass the test. Thankfully, I passed on my first try.

Once the test is passed, then you just have to wait. This is where I am right now. I have been told that all of the paperwork can take anywhere from six months to a year to complete. I know that once all of the paperwork is filed it has to be approved by the Assistant Director of Naturalization, then by the Director of Naturalization, then by the Director of Migraciones, then by the Minister of Internal affairs, and lastly by the President of Peru himself.

I will post an update on what comes next, but I hope that this first part is helpful to anyone who is thinking about Naturalizing as a Peruvian citizen.
Last edited by bgreenman on Tue Dec 04, 2012 2:31 pm, edited 3 times in total.


MartitaAQP
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby MartitaAQP » Mon Nov 19, 2012 2:31 am

Nice of you to share your notes! I've gone a similiar path, but as a worker. Curious to know WHEN you passed the exam? (since that's the official beginning of the complete tramite). And have you been able to get answers in Lima on the status in the past few months? I live in Arequipa, and when turnovers started in migraciones in August, they stopped answering the phones and there is NO status information available. Here in Aqp migraciones they say LIma ignores them too so they can't get information either. Insane. My exam was passed in February so I'm 9 months and counting. You?

Martha
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby WakilWakefield » Tue Nov 20, 2012 8:21 am

Hi !
Thank you for your posts.
Where are some good sources explaining how to get the different visa,work,school and business are those that interest me. Do you know if the visa for volunteering is the same as a tourist visa?
Martha,do you have a link on obtaining a work visa? Do you have any links to employment sites as well?
Enjoy your days.
Warm regards,
W.w.
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby bgreenman » Tue Nov 20, 2012 3:13 pm

I live in Lima, so that makes life a little bit easier for me. Even still, the only way that I have successfully been able to get in touch with them is by going in person and talking to them during their regular business hours. I only just took the test in September, so you are farther along than I am.

I went back in October to make sure that I passed. If I didn't then I wanted to make sure that I got on the list to retake it at the end of October. They pulled my file and showed me that I had indeed passed the test. They told me that from that point on it could take up to a year, but they also sounded hopeful. I was told that I would probably be contacted within the next three months to come back to migraciones to fill out some more paperwork. From there they said that it would probably be another three months before it all got finalized.

When they were flipping through my file I noticed that they had obviously been working on it. There were new official looking documents attached to it as well as new stamps and seals on each page. At least that gave me the peace of mind that it is moving forward. We will just have to wait and see how long it takes. I will post again as soon as I have any new news.
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby bgreenman » Fri Nov 23, 2012 9:12 am

WakilWakefield wrote:Where are some good sources explaining how to get the different visa,work,school and business are those that interest me. Do you know if the visa for volunteering is the same as a tourist visa?
Martha, do you have a link on obtaining a work visa? Do you have any links to employment sites as well?


Hey W.w. DIGEMIN (The migrations office here in Peru) has a lot of resources on their website about requirements for different resident visas in both English and Spanish. Here is the link to their resident visa info page:

http://www.digemin.gob.pe/en/servicios_inmigracion_visas_residentes.html

Also, there is a really good resource called the Ultimate Peru List that has all types of detailed information about the different procedures to navigate through all of the paperwork of getting a visa and getting a job in Peru:

http://theultimateperulist.blogspot.com/
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby Lon » Mon Nov 26, 2012 2:05 pm

I am also taking a similar route (I am not married to a Peruvian), but as a rentista (Calidad migratoria: rentista). Apparently this is also an acceptable category to apply for Peruvian citizenship through naturalization. I have almost all of the required documentation, but the most cumbersome is the economic solvency one. I am using my Social Secutiy benefits to fulfill this requirement. According to the Naturalization Department in the Ministry of the Interior (DIGEMIN), I need from Social Security Administration an original document with an original signature (i.e., not a machine signature) stating the amount of my monthly Social Security benefits. I know this can be done because I saw such a document from SSA in the Naturalization Department in one of the personal application files from another US citizen. In addition to the original signature at the bottom of the letter, I saw on this document in the Naturalization Department a stamp at the upper right hand corner which said "This is an official verification of Social Security and/or SSI benefits". This stamp included an original signature and date. I took them a copy of my benfits statement from SSA which had been notarized by the US Embassy. They said this was not acceptable and showed me the above-mentioned letter. I'm not sure if you're aware of it, but getting an original letter with an original signature from SSA is extremely difficult and is taking a lot of time. When I wrote to SSA they said to get it from the embassy, but the UISEmbassy does not have a federal benefits officer. They are trying to get such a letter from the Costa Rica SSA regional office. I am also trying my Congressman and the regional SSA office in Fairfax Virginia. If you have the time, (perhaps some evening or any other convenient time) I would love to meet with you to find out in some more detail about the process. I also have several questions for you. Please contact me at my e-mail address ([email protected]) or my cell phone 992861875. I would greatly appreciate your advice on certain other aspects of my application as well. I could show you the package I have assembled so far.
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby mechem » Mon Nov 26, 2012 6:58 pm

Great info. I'm considering doing this for my work visa, but I've heard a lot of things about the wait at the end being frustratingly long. Not surprising considering Peru.

But what I wonder is how does that affect your residency renewal process for the next year? Can you show your tramite in process and be exempt from all the renewal procedure? Or do you have to still follow through with it? I guess you'll find out soon enough.
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby Josue M » Thu Nov 29, 2012 4:07 pm

Wow, it's good to finally find some detailed information about this process, I have been looking for over 2 years for something like this. I will begin the process next year as soon as they change my carne de extraneria to the adult one, since i turned 18. when you say that it will be between 6 months and a year to finish the paperwork, does that mean until you actually get citizenship, or does that not include getting it signed by the people you said? They told me that the whole process may take 5 years, but I think they just did not want me to apply, the website says 1 year. But after you pass the test, how long is it until you actually have the citizenship? Thank you very much for writing about this process, there is nothing else this detailed anywhere.
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby bgreenman » Thu Nov 29, 2012 11:16 pm

mechem wrote:But what I wonder is how does that affect your residency renewal process for the next year? Can you show your tramite in process and be exempt from all the renewal procedure?


If I understood correctly, then you have to continue to renew your residency each year until the entire process comes to an end. There are no changes in that respect until you actually become a Peruvian citizen and receive your Titulo de Naturalizacion.

Josue M wrote:Wow, it's good to finally find some detailed information about this process, I have been looking for over 2 years for something like this.


Thanks! I know, I was really frustrated that I couldn't find information about this process anywhere. I figured that other people would be in the same boat.

Josue M wrote:when you say that it will be between 6 months and a year to finish the paperwork, does that mean until you actually get citizenship, or does that not include getting it signed by the people you said? They told me that the whole process may take 5 years, but I think they just did not want me to apply, the website says 1 year. But after you pass the test, how long is it until you actually have the citizenship?


I wish that I had an answer. Currently I am still in the process of waiting. The DIGEMIN officer who has been helping me told me that it would probably be 3-6 months until I was called back to sign my Titulo, and from there it would probably be another 3 months until it was actually official. With that said I have heard many people say that they were told that the process takes longer. We will just have to wait and see. I will write with an update as soon as I receive any new communication with DIGEMIN.

If there is anyone else who has already been through this process, then I would love to here how long it took for you.
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby MartitaAQP » Tue Dec 04, 2012 12:31 pm

What can I say? This tramite is simply hellish.

After I passed my exam in February I have heard NOTHING for more than 9 months. The last time I got an update (after insistent begging over the phone) was in August when there were changes happening fast. I spoke to the "Directora" of the office and when I called back 15 minutes later as she asked, I was told "There is no directora, she doesn't work here anymore." 15 minutes! HA! Anyway, I JUST got a hold of Migraciones in Lima after trying for MONTHS to get a phone call answered. The good news is: I'm approved! The president signed, NOW I have to go get fingerprinted and photographed for the titulo de ciudadania (and what were those pictures for "titulo" that we already had to turn in?) and then 30 days later the titulo should be ready. 4 years ya'll and the end is in sight.
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby bgreenman » Tue Dec 04, 2012 2:28 pm

MartitaAQP wrote:The good news is: I'm approved! The president signed, NOW I have to go get fingerprinted and photographed for the titulo de ciudadania (and what were those pictures for "titulo" that we already had to turn in?) and then 30 days later the titulo should be ready. 4 years ya'll and the end is in sight.


First off, congratulations! Glad to know that the process does actually move forward, even if it is painfully slow.

Do you know that it is all approved only because you called, or have they sent some sort of notification to your home? I am trying to figure out how often I should try to check on the process. I don't want to call them too often and annoy them, but I also don't want to be waiting for months while they are just waiting for me to come in and check how everything is going.

Also, thanks to Lon, we now have a copy of the model letter that needs to be written to the president. You can find it by clicking on the following link, or I have also updated my original post to include the same url:

http://www.12degreessouth.com/downloads/model-letter-to-president.pdf
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby MartitaAQP » Tue Dec 04, 2012 10:22 pm

I recommend banging down their door on a weekly basis.

I tried EVERYTHING to get ahold of them August-October. Living in Arequipa, I couldn't go in person so I called all the time and they simply would not answer the phone! In the office of migraciones in Aqp they threw up their hands and said "They don't answer us either."

Today when we FINALLY got ahold of a human being, they said it was approved in JULY but after a stupid courier said my address didn't exist (which every courier they sent to my house ALWAYS said and they had a NOTE Of this in their file to IGNORE the courier and send it to the migraciones office in Arequipa) they just stopped trying - no email, no phone call, no contact to migraciones Arequipa. THey let it SIT there for 6 months while I did everything except flying to Lima to come go through their files. So my advice? Make sure every dang person in that office knows your name and face and that you are on pins and needles waiting for that tramite so that when yours comes in, it's not piled on the desk and forgotten like mine.
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby MartitaAQP » Tue Dec 04, 2012 10:24 pm

In response to the PP, Yes, you have to renew. If your residency laps 1 day, your tramite is effectively canceled. You MUST maintain good standing residency until the day you are handed your titulo and turn in your CE. I've renewed TWICE since I completed my 2 years and started this tramite (total time will be 4 years since I started down this road)
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby Josue M » Tue Dec 11, 2012 11:32 pm

When they said they would probably call you back in 3-6 months to sign the Titulo, I assume that means the Titulo de Naturalizacion?
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby bgreenman » Wed Dec 12, 2012 9:48 am

Josue M wrote:When they said they would probably call you back in 3-6 months to sign the Titulo, I assume that means the Titulo de Naturalizacion?


Yes. I haven't gotten to this part yet, but I believe DIGEMIN issues you your Titulo de Naturalizacion. It is that document that shows that you are now a Peruvian citizen. From there the next step would be to go to RENIEC to get your DNI.
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby Josue M » Wed Dec 12, 2012 2:58 pm

@martita: You said you passed the exam in February. Do you mean February of this year 2012? I am just trying to find out about how long it is from the time of passing the test until you get the Titulo de Naturalizacion. Thanks.
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby Josue M » Fri Dec 14, 2012 10:41 pm

MartitaAQP wrote:What can I say? This tramite is simply hellish.

After I passed my exam in February I have heard NOTHING for more than 9 months. The last time I got an update (after insistent begging over the phone) was in August when there were changes happening fast. I spoke to the "Directora" of the office and when I called back 15 minutes later as she asked, I was told "There is no directora, she doesn't work here anymore." 15 minutes! HA! Anyway, I JUST got a hold of Migraciones in Lima after trying for MONTHS to get a phone call answered. The good news is: I'm approved! The president signed, NOW I have to go get fingerprinted and photographed for the titulo de ciudadania (and what were those pictures for "titulo" that we already had to turn in?) and then 30 days later the titulo should be ready. 4 years ya'll and the end is in sight.

When you say you passed the exam in february, do you mean this february 2012? I am trying to find out about how long it takes once you finish the exam until actually being a citizen.
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby Josue M » Wed Jan 02, 2013 3:45 pm

About the test, what exactly were the questions? It should be easy for me since i partly grew up in Peru, and i went to school here, especially the national anthem one would be easy, i used to sing it every monday morning at school. But i would like to know more about what kind of questions they ask. Thanks.
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby bgreenman » Sun Jan 06, 2013 10:42 pm

They say that they switch out the questions, but they asked me the following:

- Write down the last verse of the national anthem.
- Name six coastal rivers.
- How many volcanoes are there in Peru?
- How many cordilleras are there in Peru?
- Name the countries that share a border with Peru?
- Who was known as the Brujo de los Andes?
- Name five of Peru's departments.
- Name the president, the prime minister, and the president of congress.
- Name three Peruvian authors and at least one work by each author.
- The date of independence and of the Combate de Angamos.

Happy studying.
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby Josue M » Sun Jan 13, 2013 11:30 pm

Does anyone know if people who have citizenship by naturalization can be elected to congress, or be peruvian diplomats? I can't find anything about that either.
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby fanning » Sun Jan 13, 2013 11:40 pm

Josue M wrote:Does anyone know if people who have citizenship by naturalization can be elected to congress, or be peruvian diplomats? I can't find anything about that either.

I suppose as a law abiding citizen of Peru you know the constitucion !
According to art. 90 you cannot be congresista as you must be born a Peruvian.
Art 110 prohibits you to be President for the same reason, while art 124 makes sure you never will be Ministro de Estado.
Finally art 147 gives you no right on being a Magistrado de la corte Supremo.
http://www.tc.gob.pe/constitucion.pdf
:roll:
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby MartitaAQP » Sat Jan 19, 2013 4:26 pm

I went in December to be put in the book of titulos de ciudania - it's a big registro where they put your picture and your fingerprints. Then they printed out my titulo with my picture and had me sign it. THey gave me a copy of the executive order making me a citizen. They then send the titulo to be signed by the director of migraciones and they are supposed to call me to come attend a swearing-in ceremony where I will sing the anthem, give a speech, and me awarded my copy of the titulo. That should be next week but I am still trying to confirm.
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby MartitaAQP » Sat Jan 19, 2013 4:27 pm

Oh, and yes, February 2012 I passed my exam. They said it was actually signed by the president in July but migraciones misplaced it and didn't get it to me so only with insistent begging did they "find" it in December.
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby Josue M » Sat Jan 19, 2013 11:03 pm

So the whole process took about a year? How long did you have to wait to take the test from the time you applied for citizenship?
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby bgreenman » Sun Jan 20, 2013 7:10 am

The test is given on the last Friday of every month. I turned in all of my documents towards the end of August, and they scheduled me for the test at the end of September. If you turn all of your completed documents in at the beginning of the month, then you may even be able to get scheduled for the test that same month.
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby MartitaAQP » Wed Jan 23, 2013 4:00 pm

I turned in everything in May 2011 but they wanted additional papers which I turned in in September 2011 and took the exam for the first time in January 2012. They apparently tried to summon me before that but if you don't live in Lima, you're screwed and they won't bother to contact you about anything or answer your phone calls. I passed the exam in February 2012. I am STILL waiting for this mysterious swearing-in ceremony they said would be January but now say they don't know when it will be. They say the shortest is a year. If you live in Lima, the total time from completing minimum residency to having citizenship has to be at LEAST that long but in my case it will have been nearly 2 years although I hve done everything as fast as humanly possible from the "provincia"
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby DC_20833 » Tue Jan 29, 2013 9:49 pm

Interesting post. I have no real reason to become a citizen here in Peru. Maybe so I can get credit who wants credit here I helped my girlfriend with some of her credit debt it was awful. Thank God its over. Maybe so I can vote? Does it really matter all Politicians are corrupt nothing really changes. Ok with that said I did find it an interesting post. I got my Carnesta last year before that I gladly paid the fines for overstays and hold the record for them I think I paid once for a 2.5 year overstay. The Immigration people in Tacna were always very nice to me and my Mom even the ones in Chile. Once the Peruvians had a nurse sit with my Mom in the car while I took care of the stuff at the window in Chile. Bottled water was given to her a nice gesture.

Anyways, now that I am legal I want to stay that way. So I checked my Carnesta and I need to pay the yearly tax I am not interested in paying fines anymore I want to be a good guest. So I checked my Carnesta on the reverse side where those stickers are supposed to go. Here are my questions.

The first line on the reverse side says TASA de Extranjera and then pre printed across the boxes is "Exonerado Ley 28072" so I think I don't owe the Peruvians anything on that one. Am I correct?

Then there is a second line of boxes that says Prorroga de Residencia (PDR) also pre printed across the boxes is the word "Indefinido". I might owe some soles on that one. If I do where do I go pay and how much is it?
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby craig » Wed Jan 30, 2013 12:19 pm

DC_20833 wrote:Anyways, now that I am legal I want to stay that way. So I checked my Carnesta and I need to pay the yearly tax.

You are a rentista. So you don't owe any tax or have to do any annual renewal.
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby Lon » Sat Feb 16, 2013 11:24 am

For those of you who may be applying for Peruvian citizenship w/o being married to a Peruvian, here is some bad news - on Dec. 23 they raised the fee charged for submission of the application from S./54 to S./2,484.10. Yes, you read that right. It's really unbelievable that they would raise it that much in one golpe. I thought it was a mistake, but then in Naturalizacion (DIGEMIN) they showed me the list of fees and there it was. What a depressing shock!!!! And that's not all, if you decide to pay this much and you get approved you still have to pay another S./ 185.
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby FHCZ » Sat Feb 16, 2013 7:54 pm

Lon wrote:For those of you who may be applying for Peruvian citizenship w/o being married to a Peruvian, here is some bad news - on Dec. 23 they raised the fee charged for submission of the application from S./54 to S./2,484.10. Yes, you read that right. It's really unbelievable that they would raise it that much in one golpe. I thought it was a mistake, but then in Naturalizacion (DIGEMIN) they showed me the list of fees and there it was. What a depressing shock!!!! And that's not all, if you decide to pay this much and you get approved you still have to pay another S./ 185.


There has been a general outcry in the Peruvian population and consumer protection groups have taken matters into their hands because the "tramites" pertaining to the "Ministerio del Interior" have been increased up to 1200%. Consumer. The "Ministro del Interior" has promised to look into this. Check this link (Spanish):

http://peru21.pe/actualidad/otros-tramites-tambien-sufrieron-alza-precios-2116211
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby Josue M » Mon Feb 25, 2013 10:06 pm

Do you think the price will go down again? That sounds rediculous. Do you get it back if the application is rejected?
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby bgreenman » Wed Mar 06, 2013 11:19 am

I have some good news...well, kind of. It looks like DIGEMIN has lowered it's prices. Now, according to their web site the derecho de tramite costs S/. 569.50. It is still much more expensive than the S/. 54 that it cost last year, but much better than the S/. 2484.10 that they were charging at the beginning of the year. I'm glad I applied last year!
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby MartitaAQP » Wed Mar 06, 2013 6:17 pm

The answer to "do you get it back" is OF COURSE NOT. Which makes sense, since it's a "derecho de tramite" but I was also made to pay for my titulo de ciudania at the beginning which is expensive and also non-refundable even though it is very likely you WON'T get the titulo.
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby bgreenman » Fri Mar 08, 2013 12:31 am

MartitaAQP wrote:The answer to "do you get it back" is OF COURSE NOT. Which makes sense, since it's a "derecho de tramite" but I was also made to pay for my titulo de ciudania at the beginning which is expensive and also non-refundable even though it is very likely you WON'T get the titulo.


Martita, just wondering how your tramite is going? Have you had your special ceremony yet, or have there been more setbacks? You seem very negative about probably not getting the titulo, but last I read the end was in sight for you.
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby MartitaAQP » Sun Mar 10, 2013 4:24 pm

As of last Friday, my tramite is DONE. I'm a Peruvian Citizen. :D 5 years, at least $4000, and a LOT of persistance later.

I think that if you are committed to it AND you can show solvencia economica, then it can be done. However, I've seen the stacks of denied or suspended tramites in the office and only 2 of us finished it in the past year. Most people just give up OR just can't get the solvencia economica.

How's yours?
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby bgreenman » Sun Mar 10, 2013 10:28 pm

Congratulations! I'm glad to hear that at least someone has finished the tramite. I have definitely taken advantage of the fact that I live in Lima, and I have been paying the people in the naturalization office monthly visits to see how things are going. Getting anyone on the phone who knows anything about my specific tramite is next to impossible. In fact, the people at the naturalization office flat out told me that the best way to know what is going on is by visiting them in person each month. There was pretty much no news for the last five months or so, but at the end of February when I went I was told that it had been sent off to the Ministro del Interior to be the signed by the president. I was told that if all goes well, then it should be ready towards the end of March or beginning of April. I am cautiously optimistic.

The economic solvency was a bit tricky for me as per my visa requirements I cannot earn an income in Peru. I do, however, receive a monthly salary from my mission in Miami. I got in touch with them, and then I got them to write a letter saying that this was my monthly salary and has been for the last number of years. We attached the letter to the pay stub, notarized it, sent it to Talahassee to get it apostilled, brought it down here, got it all oficially translated, and lastly legalized by the Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores. Apart from that I turned in American and Peruvian bank statements to show how the money came into the country. If all of that isn't enough, then I don't know what will be.
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby Josue M » Mon Mar 11, 2013 4:47 pm

Any news yet? What about this naturalization ceremony? Do you get the titulo before that, or do you have to wait until after the ceremony?
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby Josue M » Sun Mar 17, 2013 11:01 pm

So if you finished the tramite, do you mean you also already did the ceremony? or can you get the titulo or citizen documents before that? You say it took 5 years, i hope you don't mean the process of becoming a citizen. Does that also include residence time?
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby MartitaAQP » Thu Mar 21, 2013 1:58 pm

My ceremony was March 8th. I was sworn in then as a Peruvian citizen. I have the titulo in my possession. I've already processed my DNI with RENEIC and am just waiting for that to be ready for pick up now (a 20 day wait).

To give an idea of timeline when I say 5 years I mean since i began the path of tourist>citizen
-4 months obtaining worker residency (some processes have changed since then)
-2 years as resident
-9 months from Application to exam
-10 months from exam to being told President has signed executive order
-3 months from signing citizenship book to being summoned for ceremony

That's a rough timeline but I have all my notes and will soon write a full guide. It can be done!

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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby MartitaAQP » Thu Mar 21, 2013 2:06 pm

Josue M wrote:Any news yet? What about this naturalization ceremony? Do you get the titulo before that, or do you have to wait until after the ceremony?



You see it and sign it before that but they don't give it to you under you are sworn in at the ceremony (you pay s/15 and get 5 certified copies as well which is what you use at RENEIC).
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby Josue M » Thu Mar 28, 2013 12:25 am

You use the certifies copies at the REINEC so does that mean you can get the DNI before the ceremony? What is the ceremony like?
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby MartitaAQP » Thu Mar 28, 2013 8:52 am

You don't get ANYTHING, original OR copies until the ceremony. So no, no go on RENEIC or anything else until you turn in your CE and get the original and copies AT the ceremony. You're not a citizen until you are sworn in.

THe ceremony is short, they read some formal documents (everyone dresses up, Percy from the Nat office forgot not to dress casual on Fridays so he couldn't come) ... you sing the anthem, then each individual swears an oath of loyalty to the Constitution and receives their titulo and a copy of the Constitution, you can give a speech (optional) of thanks, then they give a speech about you, and then everyone hugs and cries and you're done :) Tears optional too but no dry eyes in my ceremony.
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby jimuazu » Tue Apr 16, 2013 9:42 am

I'm going to watch this thread as it looks like the Citizenship through Marriage has moved a lot closer to what you guys have been through. Regular visits from Huancayo to Lima, then!
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby Josue M » Thu Apr 18, 2013 8:55 pm

In reply to the last comment, I think Citizenship by marriage should be harder, it was too easy before, and it's not fair that people can become citizens just because they are married to one, but that people who grew up here and went to school here and consider themselves from here have to go through a long difficult process. Many people who become citizens by marriage do not even speak Spanish and do not consider themselves from here. A lot of people even get married to a citizen just so they can become one, than they get a divorice.
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby Lon » Fri Apr 19, 2013 4:40 am

There have been two changes since Billy's original post: 1) the "derecho de tramite" now costs S/. 569.58 (raised from S/. 54 on Dec. 23, 2012, thankfully NOT S/. 2,440 as I was told by a person in Naturalizacion in Feburary) and 2) in addition to the Decalracion Jurada stating that you have no criminal record, you have to prove it by getting a "ficha de canje internacional" from Interpol which costs S/.80.50. Part of this process is also sending a request to the FBI (if US citizen) to search records to see if there are any arrests etc. Interpol will give you the forms and address to do this. To pay the FBI for this costs US$ 18 (requires cashier's check issued by BCP or Scotia Bank made out to the Treasury of the US). You can get all this information from http://www.pnp.gob.pe/especiales/interp ... icios.html
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby jimuazu » Fri Apr 19, 2013 7:27 am

Josue M wrote:In reply to the last comment, I think Citizenship by marriage should be harder, it was too easy before, and it's not fair that people can become citizens just because they are married to one, but that people who grew up here and went to school here and consider themselves from here have to go through a long difficult process. Many people who become citizens by marriage do not even speak Spanish and do not consider themselves from here. A lot of people even get married to a citizen just so they can become one, than they get a divorice.


Well you should be happy because it is indeed harder now! There is a husband-wife interview, INTERPOL check, cultural exam, you need evidence that you are living together, (ideally) have shared assets, that you have a steady income, pay your taxes, all that stuff. It is looking harder than my wife's UK citizenship application we did some years back. Well, after almost 7 years of marriage, Spanish is not a big problem, learning random facts is just a necessary chore, I'm now accustomed to Peruvian bureaucracy, I'm accustomed to regular round-trips up into remote highland villages to get copies of certificates, etc, we have RENIEC in Lima taped (get there early!), official translations, etc, etc. After all this I think you should become an honorary Peruvian just through so much exposure to Peruvian bureaucracy! There are two ways out: either you become a gibbering wreck, or you become Peruvian! After 6-7 years of paperwork (including my wife's UK paperwork) I'm ready for a rest -- just a few months more now, hopefully! Good luck with your own paperwork.
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby Josue M » Mon Apr 22, 2013 10:28 pm

Any news yet from writer about weather they finished yet?
Last edited by Josue M on Mon Aug 19, 2013 2:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby Josue M » Tue Apr 23, 2013 9:21 pm

Does anyone know if they still count the years if your carne expires? I have heard differently from different immigration officers, does any one know for sure?
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby Josue M » Fri May 10, 2013 11:28 pm

If someone lost their residency, and immediately become a resident again, could they count the years they had in their previous residency?
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Re: A Guide to Obtaining Citizenship through Naturalization

Postby fanning » Fri May 10, 2013 11:45 pm

From what I experienced is that in the Naturalization department they look very close, and very profesional to your paperwork / status / etc. So I would say that any irregularity is not going to help your case. You need to show 2 years of legal residency prior to your naturalization request, so if for whatever reason you lost it, it probably won't count.
And as it seems, they tightened the rules, and check your income more strict. So if you have some sort of a gap in your residency then you probably also have a gap in your income ( at least your legal income )

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