What location has Peru's best climate?

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DAF
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What location has Peru's best climate?

Postby DAF » Mon Jun 24, 2013 10:39 am

I am getting a little depressed from the lack of sun here in Lima and so I am looking for a new place to live to start my own farm as well. It seems as though Huanuco city has the country's best weather as it has sun year round and it's dry compared to Lima, however lacks green vegetation from what i have seen on the internet, maybe it's greener? Does anybody know of a place like Vilcabamba Ecuador here in Peru with mild weather, sun year round and lots of green and water springs?


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caliguy
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Re: What location has Peru's best climate?

Postby caliguy » Mon Jun 24, 2013 12:03 pm

Hi DAF,
Have you ever been to Namballe? I have been there twice. It is about 5 kilometers south of Equador, and has some really nice weather with lots of greenery. I kind of compae it with the climate in Hawaii. I have eaten some of the best produce grown in that area at 5 sole menus. Also, the beef and chicken taste of a better quality than what you get in Lima. The only negative is they dont have fish from the ocean. If ever I was to retire, this would be the place.
On a side note, I visited Huaral yesterday, and it was like a breath of "Fresh Air". Sunny, dry climate, more tranquil than Lima, and the food just tasted better. There is a lot of agriculture in Huaral also. It took us 2 hours by bus, and cost 16 soles round trip. The worst part was coming back through Plaza Norte, what a complete nite mare that was.
Attached is a photo i took of Plaza De Armas in Huaral yesterday :D
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every place has it's own spirit. you just need to tune into it.
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Arroz con Pollo
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Re: What location has Peru's best climate?

Postby Arroz con Pollo » Mon Jun 24, 2013 3:10 pm

Nice info caliguy. I'm posting here so I can find this info later. I'm gonna check both places out.
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Re: What location has Peru's best climate?

Postby chi chi » Thu Jun 27, 2013 2:41 am

Tarapoto has nice weather all year round. Average of 30 degrees celcius. (The chicas are even hotter)
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Re: What location has Peru's best climate?

Postby SmartKitty » Thu Jun 27, 2013 10:40 am

chi chi wrote:Tarapoto has nice weather all year round. Average of 30 degrees celcius. (The chicas are even hotter)

Tarapoto is a deep, deep, deep ... let's say inside. :D
Sorry, Chichi, it looks like you didn't see anything better. :wink:
My name is Fortunata Carhuapoma, pies de plomo. I'm a modest serrano girl in polleras and alpargatas.
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Re: What location has Peru's best climate?

Postby argidd » Thu Jun 27, 2013 11:32 am

DAF wrote:I am getting a little depressed from the lack of sun here in Lima and so I am looking for a new place to live to start my own farm as well. It seems as though Huanuco city has the country's best weather as it has sun year round and it's dry compared to Lima, however lacks green vegetation from what i have seen on the internet, maybe it's greener? Does anybody know of a place like Vilcabamba Ecuador here in Peru with mild weather, sun year round and lots of green and water springs?


Hi Daf

Have you looked into Cusco? I know there are coffee growers in Quillabamba. They are not as high as the city, so it doesn't get as cold (I believe). If you are considering Huánuco, consider Tarma and other locations in Junin (like Chanchamayo or Satipo).

One thing to take into consideration (if you haven't already) is that small towns and even some "cities" in Peru have limited Access to basic services like health and education. It really depends what you prefer, and what accomodates your needs.

Good luck!
Regards,

Argidd
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Re: What location has Peru's best climate?

Postby teamoperu » Thu Jun 27, 2013 5:11 pm

chi chi wrote:Tarapoto has nice weather all year round. Average of 30 degrees celcius. (The chicas are even hotter)


Beep, wrong. Correct answer is 31.4 average high temperature. But remember temps are measured in the shade, in the sun it is hotter... so hot they cover their heads, motos, and gringos with cardboard. Some gringos refuse due to vanity and they become a bit funny. Tarapoto is too hot to be even in the running for Peru's best climate.
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Re: What location has Peru's best climate?

Postby victmanu » Thu Jun 27, 2013 9:45 pm

The problem with Huanuco is for long time it has been a coca grower area and the drug dealer maffias and raketeers still work over there. Villa rica and Oxapampa has almost the same climate and are a lot safer, also Moyobamba and Lamas would be good for agriculture.
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Re: What location has Peru's best climate?

Postby richiecry » Fri Jun 28, 2013 1:34 pm

I agree with Victmanu....Moyobamba is a really nice little city and is a FAR (sorry Chi Chi) better place to live than Tarapoto (though...Tarapoto can be fun).
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Re: What location has Peru's best climate?

Postby chi chi » Sat Jun 29, 2013 8:03 am

richiecry wrote:I agree with Victmanu....Moyobamba is a really nice little city and is a FAR (sorry Chi Chi) better place to live than Tarapoto (though...Tarapoto can be fun).


There ain't a lot to do in Moyobamba.
Although it's the capital of San Martin, it's much smaller than Tarapoto which is located about 2 hours drive away. The temperature is lower than in Tarapoto because it rains all the time.

Moyobamba is a sleepy town located at the highway between Tarapoto and the coast.
Truckstops full of Peterbilt's, Internationals' and Freightliners determine the scenery in Moyabamba.
Cheap motels, gasstations and bars with ladies of the night are plentifull. 24/7 diners where truckers sipp icetea and eat huge hamburgers are plentifull.

The Banos Thermales (San Mateo) are the most important tourist attraction and worth visiting. It's open 24 hours a day and admission only costs 1.50 soles. There's an (overpriced) tourist restaurant with mediocre food. At the plaza (probably one of the largest plaza's in Peru) there are a food good bars and so so restaurants. The pizzeria at the corner has good pizza's con hormigas. (Yes, ants)
There's also a nice country and western style bar at the plaza.

Like Richiecry says, Tarapoto is more fun. Moyobamba is rather dull.

Tarapoto vs. Moyobamba is like comparing Las Vegas with Truth or Consequences in New Mexico.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Truth_or_C ... New_Mexico
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Re: What location has Peru's best climate?

Postby teamoperu » Sat Jun 29, 2013 1:13 pm

chi chi wrote:
richiecry wrote:I agree with Victmanu....Moyobamba is a really nice little city and is a FAR (sorry Chi Chi) better place to live than Tarapoto (though...Tarapoto can be fun).


Although it's the capital of San Martin, it's much smaller than Tarapoto


Beep, wrong again. Tarapoto has a population of 63,484. Moyabamba has 70,000.
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Re: What location has Peru's best climate?

Postby Sergio Bernales » Sat Jun 29, 2013 4:22 pm

DAF wrote:I am getting a little depressed from the lack of sun here in Lima and so I am looking for a new place to live to start my own farm as well. It seems as though Huanuco city has the country's best weather as it has sun year round and it's dry compared to Lima, however lacks green vegetation from what i have seen on the internet, maybe it's greener? Does anybody know of a place like Vilcabamba Ecuador here in Peru with mild weather, sun year round and lots of green and water springs?

I always thought the countryside around Arequipa was very appealing, the weather constantly warm and sunny, with lots of agriculture in the surrounding valleys, but as I've only visited for short periods, maybe someone whose lived there much longer could offer more insight.

One thing to be wary of are places that get hyped. You really don't want to find the next Vilcabamba. If you do find somewhere like this, it probably won't be the dream you imagine it to be. Firstly the foreign hordes will soon follow you, if they're not already there, and the place will end up so hyped that the reality disappoints. When I was in Vilcabamba, it was full of depressed looking expats running small businesses on a shoestring trying to sell tourist tat and mountain bike trips to hard-up backpackers - because there was so much competition and the backpacker market hardly flush, people seemed to be making scarcely enough money to get by. There was also a small community of US baby-boomer retirees convinced they're going to live to be 130 years old, most of whom showed no interest in integrating with the locals- they could have been in a rainy version of Kansas, which brings me on to the weather. That was pretty terrible and not the year-round spring climate I was expecting. Yes, the sun might come out most days of the year, but it still rains almost every day from October to May, even if you get a few hours of sunshine in the morning. So the year round spring climate of Vilcabamba is a myth, as is the idea of the villagers living to be 130.

"Even as Vilcabamba's international fame grew, scientists continued to investigate the secret of the villagers' longevity, but some were beginning to grow skeptical. In particular, Dr. Alexander Leaf, the Harvard Medical School researcher who had been among the first to conduct research in Vilcabamba, was having doubts. His suspicions were aroused when he realized that the villagers were inconsistent in their self-reported ages. For instance, in 1971 he had met a man who reported his age as 122. When Leaf returned three years later, that same man claimed to be 134 years old.

Leaf then persuaded Dr. Richard Mazess of the University of Wisconsin Madison and Dr. Sylvia Forman of the University of California Berkeley to help determine the correct ages of Vilcabamba's elderly population. They reached the conclusion that there was not a single centenarian living in Vilcabamba. The oldest person in the village was found to be 96 years old. The average age of those claiming to be over 100 years was actually 86 years. The researchers presented these results on February 27, 1978 at a workshop at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md.

Far from being the 'Valley of Longevity,' the researchers concluded that "Individual longevity in Vilcabamba is little, if any, different from that found throughout the rest of the world." Further, they reported that "Life expectancy (corrected for exaggeration) at all ages in Vilcabamba (and Loja) is in fact less than in the U.S."

t turned out that Vilcabamba did actually have a higher-than-normal percentage of elderly people. However, this was caused by migration patterns. Young people tended to move out of the area, while the elderly moved in.

Although the Vilcabambans did not enjoy greater longevity than the rest of the world, they did have one consolation. Researchers noted that the Vilcabamban lifestyle, which included hard work in a high altitude combined with a low-calorie, low-animal-fat diet, did seem to keep the villagers healthy and vigorous in their old age.
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Re: What location has Peru's best climate?

Postby victmanu » Sat Jun 29, 2013 7:05 pm

Sergio Bernales wrote:I always thought the countryside around Arequipa was very appealing, the weather constantly warm and sunny, with lots of agriculture in the surrounding valleys, but as I've only visited for short periods, maybe someone whose lived there much longer could offer more insight.

One thing to be wary of are places that get hyped. You really don't want to find the next Vilcabamba. If you do find somewhere like this, it probably won't be the dream you imagine it to be. Firstly the foreign hordes will soon follow you, if they're not already there, and the place will end up so hyped that the reality disappoints. When I was in Vilcabamba, it was full of depressed looking expats running small businesses on a shoestring trying to sell tourist tat and mountain bike trips to hard-up backpackers - because there was so much competition and the backpacker market hardly flush, people seemed to be making scarcely enough money to get by. There was also a small community of US baby-boomer retirees convinced they're going to live to be 130 years old, most of whom showed no interest in integrating with the locals- they could have been in a rainy version of Kansas, which brings me on to the weather. That was pretty terrible and not the year-round spring climate I was expecting. Yes, the sun might come out most days of the year, but it still rains almost every day from October to May, even if you get a few hours of sunshine in the morning. So the year round spring climate of Vilcabamba is a myth, as is the idea of the villagers living to be 130.

"Even as Vilcabamba's international fame grew, scientists continued to investigate the secret of the villagers' longevity, but some were beginning to grow skeptical. In particular, Dr. Alexander Leaf, the Harvard Medical School researcher who had been among the first to conduct research in Vilcabamba, was having doubts. His suspicions were aroused when he realized that the villagers were inconsistent in their self-reported ages. For instance, in 1971 he had met a man who reported his age as 122. When Leaf returned three years later, that same man claimed to be 134 years old.

Leaf then persuaded Dr. Richard Mazess of the University of Wisconsin Madison and Dr. Sylvia Forman of the University of California Berkeley to help determine the correct ages of Vilcabamba's elderly population. They reached the conclusion that there was not a single centenarian living in Vilcabamba. The oldest person in the village was found to be 96 years old. The average age of those claiming to be over 100 years was actually 86 years. The researchers presented these results on February 27, 1978 at a workshop at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md.

Far from being the 'Valley of Longevity,' the researchers concluded that "Individual longevity in Vilcabamba is little, if any, different from that found throughout the rest of the world." Further, they reported that "Life expectancy (corrected for exaggeration) at all ages in Vilcabamba (and Loja) is in fact less than in the U.S."

t turned out that Vilcabamba did actually have a higher-than-normal percentage of elderly people. However, this was caused by migration patterns. Young people tended to move out of the area, while the elderly moved in.

Although the Vilcabambans did not enjoy greater longevity than the rest of the world, they did have one consolation. Researchers noted that the Vilcabamban lifestyle, which included hard work in a high altitude combined with a low-calorie, low-animal-fat diet, did seem to keep the villagers healthy and vigorous in their old age.


Majes will be a great option in Arequipa but the irrigation project will make them raise the prices of the land .
We have our own version of Vilcabamba maybe in a smaller scale but is not related to life expectancy if not to the good weather and mysthical reasons. The urubamba sacred valley has a small expat community and people from Lima who felt some good vibes over there.
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Re: What location has Peru's best climate?

Postby teamoperu » Sun Jun 30, 2013 7:28 am

chi chi wrote:
richiecry wrote:I agree with Victmanu....Moyobamba is a really nice little city and is a FAR (sorry Chi Chi) better place to live than Tarapoto (though...Tarapoto can be fun).


... The temperature is lower than in Tarapoto because it rains all the time...



Beep, wrong on so many levels. Annual precipitation Tarapoto 1161 mm while Moyabamba is only 13% more at 1344 mm. And, rainfall will not affect average high temperatures, a rain shower will give a brief respite but average high daily temperatures are not calculated only when it is raining, it is the max for the day hence not when it is raining. One reason the temperature is lower is because Moyabamba is higher. And, a lower temperature than in Tarapoto is a good thing, Tarapoto is too hot.
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Re: What location has Peru's best climate?

Postby teamoperu » Sun Jun 30, 2013 7:31 am

Huanaco has a sign at the entrance to the city: “The city with the best climate in the world”. Why would they lie? (hehe)
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Re: What location has Peru's best climate?

Postby chi chi » Tue Jul 02, 2013 6:50 am

teamoperu wrote:
chi chi wrote:
richiecry wrote:I agree with Victmanu....Moyobamba is a really nice little city and is a FAR (sorry Chi Chi) better place to live than Tarapoto (though...Tarapoto can be fun).


Although it's the capital of San Martin, it's much smaller than Tarapoto


Beep, wrong again. Tarapoto has a population of 63,484. Moyabamba has 70,000.


For sure, you have never been to Tarapoto. Tarapoto is much bigger than Moyobamba. You can walk from one side of Moyobamba to the other within 20 minutes.
Tarapoto has more than 200000 people. Tarapoto itself isn't that big. But if you combine it with the other 2 districts (La Banda de Shilcayo and Morales) then it's a much bigger city.

Moyobamba doesn't even have an airport or supermarket. There are 2 tiny nightclubs that can only cater for around 150 people.
Tarapoto has around 25 huge nightclubs and unfortunately 15 casinos. Hopefully those casinos will be closed down by the county. Tarapoto has also a brandnew very busy airport. It has an executive lounge as well for first class and VIP passengers.
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Re: What location has Peru's best climate?

Postby ironchefchris » Tue Jul 02, 2013 10:53 am

chi chi wrote:
teamoperu wrote:
chi chi wrote:
richiecry wrote:I agree with Victmanu....Moyobamba is a really nice little city and is a FAR (sorry Chi Chi) better place to live than Tarapoto (though...Tarapoto can be fun).


Although it's the capital of San Martin, it's much smaller than Tarapoto


Beep, wrong again. Tarapoto has a population of 63,484. Moyabamba has 70,000.


For sure, you have never been to Tarapoto. Tarapoto is much bigger than Moyobamba. You can walk from one side of Moyobamba to the other within 20 minutes.
Tarapoto has more than 200000 people. Tarapoto itself isn't that big. But if you combine it with the other 2 districts (La Banda de Shilcayo and Morales) then it's a much bigger city.

Moyobamba doesn't even have an airport or supermarket. There are 2 tiny nightclubs that can only cater for around 150 people.
Tarapoto has around 25 huge nightclubs and unfortunately 15 casinos. Hopefully those casinos will be closed down by the county. Tarapoto has also a brandnew very busy airport. It has an executive lounge as well for first class and VIP passengers.


Forget the population. Explain the heat and the rain. After all, the title of the thread is 'What location has Peru's best CLIMATE.'
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Re: What location has Peru's best climate?

Postby teamoperu » Tue Jul 02, 2013 5:02 pm

chi chi wrote:
teamoperu wrote:
chi chi wrote:
richiecry wrote:I agree with Victmanu....Moyobamba is a really nice little city and is a FAR (sorry Chi Chi) better place to live than Tarapoto (though...Tarapoto can be fun).


Although it's the capital of San Martin, it's much smaller than Tarapoto


Beep, wrong again. Tarapoto has a population of 63,484. Moyabamba has 70,000.


For sure, you have never been to Tarapoto. Tarapoto is much bigger than Moyobamba. You can walk from one side of Moyobamba to the other within 20 minutes.
Tarapoto has more than 200000 people. Tarapoto itself isn't that big. But if you combine it with the other 2 districts (La Banda de Shilcayo and Morales) then it's a much bigger city.

Moyobamba doesn't even have an airport or supermarket. There are 2 tiny nightclubs that can only cater for around 150 people.
Tarapoto has around 25 huge nightclubs and unfortunately 15 casinos. Hopefully those casinos will be closed down by the county. Tarapoto has also a brandnew very busy airport. It has an executive lounge as well for first class and VIP passengers.


"Tarapoto has more than 200000 people". Beep, wrong again.

May I suggest you go to WiKi, the source of the data, and correct them about populations. And to quote you "Tarapoto itself isn't that big" and neither is Moyabamba, but to then add surrounding areas you need to do it for both.

TPP is a "brandnew very busy airport". Beeb, wrong, been there for years. ADP has improved the terminal building.

"It has an executive lounge as well for first class and VIP passengers". Beep, wrong. It has a lounge but it is a Priority Pass / Lounge Club, not Biz lounge, or First Class (who flies First Class to TPP!). Or the unwashed can pay $25 for day pass.

"For sure, you have never been to Tarapoto." Beep, wrong... for sure.

Do you ever get anything right?

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