US Visa explained (slightly) -- 80% rejected

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cajun jamie
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US Visa explained (slightly) -- 80% rejected

Postby cajun jamie » Fri Nov 16, 2007 4:09 pm

16 November, 2007 [ 16:00 ]
Peru: US Visas Based on Concrete Plans, 80 Percent of Visas Rejected

(LIP-ir) -- James Gagel, and expert in immigration affairs told Lima radio station Radio Programas that Peruvians made up a part of the 20 million illegal aliens that are residing in the United States.

Radio Programas reported that half of the illegal immigrants, 1 million, crossed the border through Mexico while the other half are immigrants that entered the country with a tourist visa and have stayed more than the time permitted, thus making them illegal aliens.

"The figure is enormous, it is a big concern for the US to have 20 million people that aren't on anyone's radar," warned Gagel.

Furthermore, he explained that 80 percent of the requests for visas to travel to the United States were denied.

He also clarified that there were thirty different visa categories, each of which permitted a different pursuit in the US such as artists, businessmen, investors, executives, managers, among others.

It is not difficult to get a visa when you meet the requirements, explained the immigration expert.

If a businessman is a manager and has been on payroll for more than a year and wants to establish a subsidiary in the US, he can request that. It requires financial stability and a certain cash flow.

"All US visas are based on concrete plans," assured Gagel. "You can't go to the US and say I would like to do something."

http://www.livinginperu.com/news-5119-travel-and-tourism-peru-us-visas-based-on-concrete-plans-80-percent-of-visas-rejected


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Postby curlyguy18 » Sat Nov 17, 2007 11:13 pm

I am not surprised at all. I have several friends living in the States illegally and yes, if you're lucky enough to get a visa to the states, you can always opt to stay there illegally, and pray that you'll never get deported. It sounds quite easy to do, huh, but what about those who really want, and are trying, to move legally? They have to go through so much hassle and procedure that takes forever. It is so unfair.
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Postby Jonathan » Sat Nov 17, 2007 11:53 pm

My wife was able to get a tourist visa to the US. I am a US citizen myself. I helped her prepare for questions (and make a binder of supporting documents) and we had proof of property ownership here in Peru. You just have to be honest and prove that you have no intentions of staying in the US.
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Postby americorps » Sun Nov 18, 2007 2:36 pm

The US immigration process is simply one of the most inhumane services our government manages. My ex was an asylee and the interviewer asked him if he was partially to blame for being repeatedly rapped by the local police.

A friend recently tried to take his nanny for a few month visit back to the states and they told her that she could go if she had a child she would leave behind.

I do not have a problem with strict standards, though I think the USA immigration policies are rather stupid..I do have a problem with statements like this from over-paid over-worked beaurocrats who have lost all compassion.

Last judge who asked a women who was rapped if she was to blame was removed from the bench. It is not acceptable behavior to put a rape victem on trial, even if better choices could have been made no one deserve to be rapped for any reason at any time no matter what.

A government with an administration that claims to be family values oriented (hah) should not be telling people they can come to our country only if we can rip their family apart to make it happen (not to mention the problem with the children with dealing with changing nannies mid-stream).

This woman is a professional with years of experience and property and family here in Peru, but I am not commenting on her not getting a visa, just the request of the official to seperate her from her children as being BETTER.
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Postby David » Sun Nov 18, 2007 5:19 pm

Jonathan wrote:My wife was able to get a tourist visa to the US. I am a US citizen myself. I helped her prepare for questions (and make a binder of supporting documents) and we had proof of property ownership here in Peru. You just have to be honest and prove that you have no intentions of staying in the US.


I could not agree with you less. My wife and I recently tried to have a cousin come to the States to study in college. We had ALL the needed paperwork, both on the Peruvian side as well as the US side. We have substantial assets in place to support him during the 4 years of schooling. He also demonstrated that he had a solid family background in Peru even though he was only 17 at the time all of his immediate family is still in Lima.

Long story short when he arrived at the embassy, they didn't even open his paperwork they just said "DENIED".
When pushed for a reason why they just said, It's cheaper to go to school in Peru. Case closed.

They put all that money into there pocket and did nothing to earn it.
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Postby naturegirl » Sun Nov 18, 2007 10:56 pm

I'm dreading applying for the visa for my husband. We-ve been married two years and still haven-t visited my parents because we-re afraid he-ll get denied.
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Postby rgamarra » Mon Nov 19, 2007 6:14 am

If you're a U.S. Citizen, then you have the right to take your husband to the States with you. They will not be worried about him immigrating illegally, since he's already married to a U.S. Citizen. What they may insist is that you apply for residency for him. Also, I think the CR1 visa is what you may need, but I am not sure. In the end, it's best to call the embassy and visit the http://www.uscis.gov to see what you need.
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Postby naturegirl » Mon Nov 19, 2007 6:19 pm

Ugh, resident visa. Why would we do that? We just want to visit? WE have just bought a flat here, we can-t afford to immigrate to the USA.
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Postby rgamarra » Mon Nov 19, 2007 7:08 pm

No kidding, my husband doesn't even want his citizenship, he constantly tells me how he doesn't need his resident visa either, but we've already invested thousands into the process, so we might as well go through with it.

I don't see you having any problems getting a Visa for your husband, hopefully they'll issue him a 10 year visa, so you won't have to keep reapplying. If not, then you might as well pay the fees.

The entire U.S. immigration system sucks! I don't like to use that word, but there's no other word or way to describe it. It drives me insane, too, that they even treat ME like a foreigner. They'll ask you why you've been out of the country for so long...Like it matters!?
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Postby gypsy » Mon Nov 19, 2007 7:36 pm

My terror is to think that Peruvians work at the US Embassy--unfortunately, this is how I really feel. Why? Because they will suffer from the same vices as every bureacratic agency I have encountered so far in Lima, and I cannot possibly feel comforted even by the fact that I hold a US passport, since I am living here and I am a natural Peruvian.

I know of one man who has lived most of his life in the US, and has been deported, leaving three homes for sale there. I know another who entered the US with a work visa, and worked there with visa 20 years, owns four houses and two businesses, but has no need to be an employee any longer, so he has no work visa, since it lapsed. He cannot leave the US, and he may well be deported, while many who came in with no legal papers to start with are now permanent residents.

Who ever said there is fairness or justice? In fact, I remember reading that the just pay for the sinners, from day one. It is abuse that messes everything up, extremes, whatever they happen to be. Then, a line must be drawn, and it is almost inevitably arbitrary.

But Peruvians working in the US Embassy--guess what--hope to have a friend in high place there when the time comes! I am being laughed at because I do not knock at friends´doors before I endeavor to follow the path of a person who simply wants to do the right thing and follow the 'rules.' The problem is the rules change constantly here, and the common worker in any agency is a self-proclaimed god of sorts, seeminglyh wanting vengeance, for some reason--maybe because I happen to have green eyes? I WAS BORN HERE DANGIT, AND I AM SO MAD!

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Postby Gar-vera » Mon Nov 19, 2007 7:47 pm

The argument that US Immigration policy "breaks up families" is widely used by the open-borders crowd, since illegals can't come and go freely as they please across the border to spend time with family. Any immigrant or illegal that chooses to live in the US without his/her family is the one who "broke up" that particular family. Most people around the world would jump at the chance to visit the US regardless of who, if anyone, was able to come with them. The horrible McCain/Kennedy senate bill recently considered by Congress included a provision that would have allowed 30 days of visitation per year for a "guest worker's" immediate family. (you had to dig deep to find that of course) What was the convoluted logic behind this idea? If they can visit legally, they won't be tempted to come illegally. Sure, if you let the bank robber walk into the vault and withdraw 500 dollars, he won't be tempted to rob the bank. :roll: Of course the bill included no provision whatsoever for families of Peruvian-born US citizens like my wife to visit. If a person on a work visa bought property and owned businesses in the US, they took a risk and lost by doing so on a visa that was temporary all along.

I do agree with David that the visa application process is just a cash cow for the embassy. I'm convinced that the officers/interviewers arrive at work each day pre-disposed to deny almost all the apps they see without even giving them legitimate consideration. There should be a way that a US citizen could obtain statistics on exactly what percentage of visitor's visas to the US are denied. As taxpayers we should have a right to know and to demand that the application process be carried out fairly, including giving reasons for denials to those who's apps are denied.
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Postby americorps » Mon Nov 19, 2007 8:42 pm

I really have to take exception to some of Gar-Vera's points. It is very easy to dismiss a legitimate argument because it is made by the fringe. However, many in the middle make those same arguments.

I favor neither open borders nor illegal immigration. I am disturbed that much of the debate becomes rhetoric however and like abortion or war there is little room for legitimate open debate, only platitudes and soundbites.

If an under-age child is an American Citizen, then his mother should not be deported.

I find that statement simply human and not equal to a call for open borders nor any other radical fringe idea.

I also think it is very poor policy of my government to allow someone to live and work in our country, to benefit from their taxes and productivity for 20 or 30 years, to kick them out when thy loose that job.

Again, i fail to see how that is pro-open border or pro-illegal immigration.

I consider it simple justice.

and this is not addressed to Gar-Vera...

but i do not understand why the debate on illegal immigrants focuses 95% of the time on punishing or expelling the illegal immigrants without offering more than lip-service to prosecuting the illegal exploiters of these immigrants. I feel, as a US Citizen, that we should be held to a higher standard for following our laws, or the same standard, not a lesser standard. I do not understand why the debate more often than not ends up with calls to expell the 12 million or so illegal immigrants without discussing how to respond the the EXTREME economic disaster that our own GAO says will befall us with raising produce costs, raising labor costs, unharvested crops and a lost of about 10 billion dollars to our economy and 2 billion to our tax base (same GAO figures estimate the cost of illegal immigrants at less than 1.5 billion in extra tax expenditures). Or including how to pay for the expulsion of 12 million people.

What will happen to their homes, their pets, the stores they shop at. It is simple to point at them and say they broke the law, but it is rather naieve to think that after allowing this complex problem to grow and grow that a simple black and white solution would solve the problem. We have been allowing it for decades and we therefore have co-responsibility with the illegal immigrants. i am not saying let them off scott free, that should not happen, but neither should we place the entire responsibility for the situation on their backs.

My grandfather said if I was part of the problem, then I have responsibility to be part of the solution. it as a very human value, not a radical fringe idea.

I want a good honest and thoughtful debate about how to stop illegal immigration, but all I hear is rhetoric, racism and platitudes without substance.

when will we be able to discuss this as civilized rational human beings?
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Postby cajun jamie » Mon Nov 19, 2007 10:00 pm

Do ya'll remember how people sometimes remind us, "our country is not a democracy - it's a constitutional republic founded on the principles of democracy."? They are correct.

Or - The people do not elect the president of this country, the electoral college does and the popular vote really is just a "guide." They too are correct.

Well, sometimes we see our country as something that we "think it is" or something that we "want it to be."

Would you all find it fair to think that today, in 2007, our country is first and foremost a capitalist society that is here to serve and protect the interests of the citizens of the united states?

Read that carefully. I emphasize citizens, meaning the sum total of all persons currently a legal member of the United States.

I'll get to the chase now: Our country is a business, here to serve the people that are already citizens. Anyone else is nothing more than a commodity to a special interest or group of special interests.

Immigrants have historically been welcome here when needed for labor. Forget the empathy, sympathy and warm fuzzy feelings about Lady Liberty. I state matter of factly that this nation cannot resolve the matters of immigration because we as a nation are not addressing them as people. As far as the United States is concerned, we are talking about the uncontrolled entrance of (not immigrants) but special interests.

Hey, look a bunch of folks just crossed the border illegally. Are they:

A) Orange pickers for California? YAY!
B) Potential terrorists? BOO!
C) Roof builders for New Orleans? YAY!
D) The next in line at the Charity Hospital? BOO!
E) Juan's long lost brother? YAY!
F) Another damn wetback who won't learn the language? BOO!
G) All of the above?


See what I mean. Who are they? They are different things to different people, but nothing to us all.

We have a problem.
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Postby americorps » Mon Nov 19, 2007 10:46 pm

I disagree that we are first and foremost capitalist society.

I believe that there has always been programs to support the impoverished, disabled and other social programs, making us democratic socialists in practice though clearly not in rhetoric.

Government control on oil and medicine, healthcare, airlines, trains, schools are all social programs...eminent domain...

I think the PURE capitalism is a modern development that is hurting society. I believe the pure profit model is negligent of other basic core values of the freedoms that define our country. Citizenship, responsibility to help our neighbors, all have been presented as core values in our past either through our legislature or through practice.

I am a capitalist, I want to earn money...but I also want there to be a safety net and healthcare for the poor and help for the disabled...even if it does not pull a profit.

I believe also that we can address abuses of immigration without lumping good immigrants and bad immigrants in one basket. i believe we have the ability, technology, and knowhow to be better than that if we decide it is important.

And a couple side notes...no terrorist crossed the border illegally, they all came with proper papers..and our own history dictates that most immigrants to the US until the 1940\s did not speak English for between 2 and 5 generations (Germans being the slowest, Asians being the fastest) and studies show that modern Latino immigrants 98% are fluent by the second generation, far better than most of our ancestors.

So, again, i see this as rhetoric, not fact based statements. I realize you were summarizing assorted views on that, not presenting them as your facts.
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Postby Gar-vera » Tue Nov 20, 2007 2:39 am

No one here has said there is a simple black-and white solution. No one here has called for the expulsion of 12 million people either, that could never happen, but if it did I'm not sure that the welfare of their pets would be high on the list of priorities.

What a shame that probably all of us know Peruvians who would gladly accept the terms of a visitor's visa and abide by it's rules, but are prevented from doing so by the current mess of illegal immigration. Our immigration attorney recently pulled up some stats from the USCIS (INS) website showing that there are visa sponsorhip apps filed by naturalized US citizens to bring their family members (parents) that were filed in, are you ready, 1986, that are currently being processed. 20 YEARS it's taking in some cases to become a legal immigrant. The economic crisis feared by the pro-amnesty crowd could be averted simply by processing the legal immigration petitions that are already filed in the system.[/i]
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Postby americorps » Tue Nov 20, 2007 2:57 am

The simple response is...no fixing the backlog will not work because that completely ignores a large part of the problem we created, what wages they will work for. Legal immigrants will not work for the same wages illegal immigrants will work for and our economy will suffer. The GAO took that in consideration with their report. you should read it.

And packs of wild feral animals is a danger and has already been a problem in some AZ towns that have eliminated the illegal (and much of the legal) immigrant population. You should check those towns out too, stores are closing by the dozens, apartments are laying vacant and as labor costs rise, many small businesses are going out of business.

The facts just do not support the sudden elimination of illegal immigration.
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Postby Gar-vera » Tue Nov 20, 2007 3:13 am

I can introduce you to many well-educated, professional foreigners who would gladly work for "low wages" in the US, compared to their current situations. Many of them drive taxis in Lima.
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Postby americorps » Tue Nov 20, 2007 3:18 am

That has nothing to do with this discussion. We are talking sub-minimum wages...a system I do not condone or support, but one that legal immigrants will not and do not put up with. So again, you are missing many facts.

We have a very difficult financial situation tied with our illegal immigration problem and your views, according to the GAO, and others who have studied the facts, spell nothing but severe economic disaster for our country.
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Postby rgamarra » Tue Nov 20, 2007 6:45 am

Wow! This turned into another interesting thread!

This is my stance: The immigration system is unjust and unfair to EVERYONE! That includes LEGALS and ILLEGALS! It also includes U.S. CITIZENS like myself.

I've been through the immigration gambit LEGALLY with my husband, and it seems like a system bent on punishing one for wanting to reside legally in the States with their family. Nearly four years ago we were paying $1,000 in immigration fees, and you pay everything UP FRONT and in CASH. The government doesn't accept credit cards. If you hire a lawyer or a visa processing service add another grand on top of the immigration fees. Each year the fees go up, so anyone wanting to legally immigrate to the U.S. to be with their family will have to cough up nearly $2,000 without a lawyer.

Forget asking immigration a question, b/c they do not know what they are talking about. We called U.S. Customs and Border Control and Homeland Security about our daughter re-entering the country with a friend who was escorting her back to the States and when we asked if she needed any documents, they said "I don't know talk to my supervisor." We asked the supervisor (in Washington D.C.) and the response? "I don't know, call Customs and Border Control in Miami." So we did that and guess what their response was? "I don't know, call airport information." AIRPORT INFORMATION?! So I called and guess what?! AIRPORT INFORMATION HAD THE ANSWER!!! Scary when you think about it.

We've also been through the scenario where they royally put us through hell and detained us in the Miami airport...including ME and my ONE YEAR OLD DAUGHTER for FIVE HOURS without food or water, because of a paperwork issue. I was brought to tears b/c of all the stress. They showed absolutely no sympathy, no concern, nothing. And the people that work in customs and border control in the Miami Int'l Airport aren't even Natural U.S. Citizens. So "god-like" complex fits the bill.

We had to report to a deferred appointment in Orlando. Thank goodness the Customs and Border Control in Orlando are A LOT nicer! So they gave us written directions on how to fill out a form, we had to pay approximately $375 for the processing fee for the form, and when we sent the form in, following their EXACT directions, it was SENT BACK to us for not being done properly. A few weeks later, my husband received his green-card and we found out all this hell that we were put through was absolutely unnecessary.

So, are you getting the picture that it's USCIS and Homeland Security that are the problem? Not the immigrants, whether legal or illegal?

USCIS has NO IDEA differentiating their left hand from their right hand.

What does this really all come down to? Why did all this immigration security start? It goes right back to 9/11, because before 9/11 illegal immigration didn't seem like such a hot topic or national priority.

The terrorists that attacked our country DIDN'T come in through the U.S./Mexican border. The terrorists that attacked our country DIDN'T come into the U.S. ILLEGALLY! The U.S. government ISSUED them visas to enter our country, to reside in our country, to study in our country. And since the U.S. immigration system is a royal disaster, they slipped through the cracks. So the terrorists EXPLOITED our immigration system and they did it legally. Now the system is punishing the immigrant for THEIR mistakes. Doesn't seem fair to me.

I could go on, but that just leads into another topic. The only reason my husband will be applying for his citizenship is so we don't have to stay in the mess that is our immigration system. Plus it avoids having to apply for a visa each time we want to travel to Europe.

That's more like my 10 cents....
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Postby Gar-vera » Tue Nov 20, 2007 7:22 pm

Americorps wrote:That has nothing to do with this discussion. We are talking sub-minimum wages...a system I do not condone or support, but one that legal immigrants will not and do not put up with. So again, you are missing many facts.

We have a very difficult financial situation tied with our illegal immigration problem and your views, according to the GAO, and others who have studied the facts, spell nothing but severe economic disaster for our country.


None of the immigrants or illegals that I know are working for sub-minimum wage. None of the illegals that I know want to be American citizens. None of the illegals that I know have told me that they will suddenly demand/expect higher pay if they are granted legal status (I have asked) Many well-educated immigrants with professional experience are perfectly happy to be working in the US in unskilled, manual labor jobs, I can introduce you to them, including my wife. Not forever of course, but to get started here, yes. Interesting that a staunch profit-is-evil/anti-capitalist like yourself is suddenly worried about economic disaster for our country.

What I and others here are sick of is seeing many in the US tripping over themselves to grant visitation/residency privileges to illegals when naturalized citizens can't have the same for their foreign families. It is an INSULT to us.
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Postby americorps » Tue Nov 20, 2007 9:40 pm

I am dissapointed in your dishonest rhetoric.

I am opening a business, I want to make a profit. I am a capitalist, just not a purist. I also have a sense of ethics, civic pride, help thy neighbor. It is, to me, called being a Christian and being an American. ..and I am sorry you find that so distasteful.

I will end the discussion with you because you have resorted to the very tactic I referred to above, silly dishonest rhetoric. You have made up an attack on me and accused me of things that are not true, and expect me to defend myself. I am not hurt, just disspointed and not going to stoop to your level.

As I was raised, my grandfather told me that if you have to resort to things like that instead of sticking with the facts, then you have not a leg to stand on.

I will be glad to debate others, but your false rhetoric does not deserve my attention or respect.
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Postby curlyguy18 » Tue Nov 20, 2007 10:39 pm

Gar-vera wrote:I can introduce you to many well-educated, professional foreigners who would gladly work for "low wages" in the US, compared to their current situations. Many of them drive taxis in Lima.


Amen!
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Postby Alan » Wed Nov 21, 2007 10:50 am

Boy.. it is a complex issue, rife with strong feelings; you have all been quite eloquent and good to read.

I am a recent fan of "30s Rock", a sitcom with some of the old SNL cast that plays on Sony. Last night, Alec Baldwin - who is scheming to become CEO of his company - is told that he needs to clean up his image, and one of the things he needs to get rid of is Manuel, the undocumented resident who works as his gardener. Baldwin´s response was something to the effect of "No.. I can´t get rid of him. An English speaker would starve on what I pay him". Point being that probably for Manuel, the job is better than he had back in his home country, but that Alec is still taking advantage of his situation as an illegal.

I am not in favor of illegal immigration, but what I cannot understand is how the US (and other countries in the same pickle) turned a blind eye to illegal immigration for so many years, sending a tacit message that it was "almost okay", then, all of a sudden they pull a 180, and people with homes, jobs and families are sudenly jerked out of their surroundings and sent back "home". It hardly seems fair, or even "good business...if we are going to use the "country as a business" metaphor. Instead, why not set up some criteria for an amnesty.. admit past errors... build the bloody wall... and try again? Make it clear that you are not setting a precedent with the amnesty.


Cheers,
Alan
(ps... All of those on this board who are quasi-illegal in Peru, please raise your hand)
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Postby steve » Wed Nov 21, 2007 11:18 am

Well I fit in the same boat with David, Gar-vera and others. I have tried on two different separate occasions to get tourist visa's for one of my sister-in-laws and my mother-in-law. In both cases we had all the necessary paperwork and both times were denied the visa after a five minute or less interview in which they NEVER looked at any of the supporting documents. Both times I called the Embassy and wrote letters to my congressmen here in Mississippi and both times got the same old sad story, of sorry its up to the individual officer to grant or deny visa's based on the interview there is nothing we can do about it better luck next time. And don't even get me started on the green card issue.............
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Postby tomsax » Wed Nov 21, 2007 12:13 pm

Alan makes a very good point that a country can turn a blind eye to illegal immigration. And yes, that has happened in Peru with many people, me in the past included, working here illegally. The reasons this happens are political and I imagine that this may have happened in the States too.

The problem is, I imagine it is very difficult to have an amnesty and not create the message, intentionally or otherwise, that illegal immigration can be an accepted route.

My concern is when illegals are skapegoated for an inefficient immigration service. A good immigration service must try to stop false claims, and to accept true ones, and hand out or not hand out visas accordingly. There will always be false claims. Sending people back and making life miserable for existing illegals won't actually help efficient immigration in the slightest. It's tempting to want other people to suffer just becuase you have (for being refused a visa for a relative) but I think this is just based on resentment rather than a clear idea of how to improve things.

Blame illegals for breaking the law yes, but don't try and blame them for other people failings.
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Postby steve » Wed Nov 21, 2007 1:49 pm

I personally don't blame the illegal immigrants for the failure of the system, on the contrary I blame the failure of the system for the illegal immigrants.
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Postby rgamarra » Wed Nov 21, 2007 4:19 pm

"illegals" is a nice word for de-humanizing people. We forget that they are human, too. Just an observation. :idea:
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Postby Gar-vera » Wed Nov 21, 2007 7:11 pm

Alan wrote:I am not in favor of illegal immigration, but what I cannot understand is how the US (and other countries in the same pickle) turned a blind eye to illegal immigration for so many years, sending a tacit message that it was "almost okay", then, all of a sudden they pull a 180, and people with homes, jobs and families are sudenly jerked out of their surroundings and sent back "home". It hardly seems fair, or even "good business...if we are going to use the "country as a business" metaphor. Instead, why not set up some criteria for an amnesty.. admit past errors... build the bloody wall... and try again? Make it clear that you are not setting a precedent with the amnesty.


Cheers,
Alan
(ps... All of those on this board who are quasi-illegal in Peru, please raise your hand)


I agree completely with your assessment and suggestions, as long as border enforcement is significantly better than it has been over the past decades, and as long as the deal doesn't grant perks to the amnesty recipients that legal immigrants don't have, which has been my beef all along. If amnesty is granted, some encouragement toward assimilation would be nice, and would help everyone involved although amnesty activists seldom mention it. Of course, any amnesty recipient would receive work/travel/residency permission long before many of the applicants for legal residency that are already filed in the system but still waiting to enter, also grossly unfair.
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Postby Ron » Wed Nov 21, 2007 7:19 pm

My brother-in-law was denied a visitor visa, to the USA, on Monday. The interviewer asked him 3 questions:

1. Where do you work? A: He is a student at Catholica.
2. Do you own any property? A: He is a student so, no.
3. Do you have a wife/children? A: No.

Thank-you, but denied. Approx. 2 minutes.

What really blows my mind is that they did not look at any of his documentation. His mother has been to Canada to visit us and to the states to visit her other daughter. The letter written by the brother-in-law who used to work at the embassy in Lima, the copy of finances etc...not even a peek!! Brutal. And apparently, as seen in this post, this is the norm. Why would you not, at least, check the documentation and then make a decision based on the information presented to you?

See more people, make more money (for the US) feel like God? I really would hate to believe that these are the reasons why people make these decisions.
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Postby rgamarra » Wed Nov 21, 2007 7:26 pm

Amnesty - NOUN:pl. am·nes·ties
A general pardon granted by a government, especially for political offenses.

I'm not going to go into great detail about the U.S. government's proposed "amnesty" bill, but if one looks into it, it sounds more like it's "penalizing" or "punishing" illegal residents, not pardoning them for having entered and having resided in the country illegally.

Again, the government is trying to punish EVERYONE else for their gross error.

This is just another reflection of how divided our country is, and a house divided against itself cannot stand.

You want to know what's unfair, when LEGAL RESIDENTS are detained at immigration road blocks just for looking like a latino immigrant. This happened to my husband and they finally released him after THREE HOURS, even though he had his residence card in hand. They exercise racial profiling, because they were only detaining Latin Americans and not Asians, or Europeans, or Middle Easterners. That's what I call unfair and ILLEGAL.
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Postby rgamarra » Wed Nov 21, 2007 7:36 pm

Ron wrote:See more people, make more money (for the US) feel like God? I really would hate to believe that these are the reasons why people make these decisions.


These people are not personally profiting from denying visas. No one is paying them under the table. I'm pretty sure that there are a certain number of visas that they are permitted to issue each year.

And in Lima, it's who you know, not what you know that counts. I think most of us who have lived and worked there can attest to that fact.

Is the process fair? Probably not, but they're trying to avoid issuing visas to potential persons who may have motives to stay illegally.

My brother-in-law was denied a visa twice, but once he got married, had a child and a stable job, the embassy issued him a visa. They want to make sure you have a very good reason for NOT wanting to overstay your visa.

I think it's best that we all look at the issue in whole.
David

Postby David » Wed Nov 21, 2007 8:10 pm

Ron wrote:My brother-in-law was denied a visitor visa, to the USA, on Monday. The interviewer asked him 3 questions:

1. Where do you work? A: He is a student at Catholica.
2. Do you own any property? A: He is a student so, no.
3. Do you have a wife/children? A: No.

Thank-you, but denied. Approx. 2 minutes.

What really blows my mind is that they did not look at any of his documentation. His mother has been to Canada to visit us and to the states to visit her other daughter. The letter written by the brother-in-law who used to work at the embassy in Lima, the copy of finances etc...not even a peek!! Brutal. And apparently, as seen in this post, this is the norm. Why would you not, at least, check the documentation and then make a decision based on the information presented to you?

See more people, make more money (for the US) feel like God? I really would hate to believe that these are the reasons why people make these decisions.


Ron,

I could not agree more. In our case the student we were trying to sponsor was denied much in the same way. I did not mention that both his parents have tourist visas for the US in which they have both used and returned to Peru without over stay.

The embassy had no good reason to deny him in the manner that they did.
They did it because they can. It seems there is no minimum standard in place. I could see if they had filled there allotment for the year, month whatever, that would be understandable. Then you can say we are no longer taking applications. But no they collect the money knowing full well they have no intention of letting you in.
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Postby curlyguy18 » Wed Nov 21, 2007 9:42 pm

They are totally making money from us!! I think at least some percentage of the application fee should be refunded, but heck no, they love taking money from the poor.
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Re: US Visa explained (slightly) -- 80% rejected

Postby LauraMH » Mon Jan 04, 2010 10:38 am

I know this is an old post and things change, I'm wondering.......anyone had any positive experience. Anyone married to a Peruivan who plans to stay and live in Peru who has been granted a tourism visa to the US. I am so nervous to try. I think it will be a lifetime before my husband tries again if he is denied.

I've been in Peru 2 years. We've been married 7 months. I don't have a US based job. We have land in Peru. I just don't know if it's worth it. I'm also wondering does anyone know if there is a limit to the number of times you can apply?
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Re: US Visa explained (slightly) -- 80% rejected

Postby Alpineprince » Mon Jan 04, 2010 11:14 am

LauraMH wrote:I know this is an old post and things change, I'm wondering.......anyone had any positive experience. Anyone married to a Peruivan who plans to stay and live in Peru who has been granted a tourism visa to the US. I am so nervous to try. I think it will be a lifetime before my husband tries again if he is denied.

I've been in Peru 2 years. We've been married 7 months. I don't have a US based job. We have land in Peru. I just don't know if it's worth it. I'm also wondering does anyone know if there is a limit to the number of times you can apply?

My wife has a 10 year tourist visa and it was a piece of cake to get (we have a son together as well). Once you have two years married, it should not be a problem.
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Re: US Visa explained (slightly) -- 80% rejected

Postby ncaparo » Tue Jan 05, 2010 11:33 am

i
Last edited by ncaparo on Fri May 14, 2010 9:47 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: US Visa explained (slightly) -- 80% rejected

Postby LauraMH » Tue Jan 05, 2010 12:08 pm

ncaparo wrote:Hi everyone,

So I am a US citizen and live here with my mom. I recently graduated college and have a full time job as an accountant. I have a brother that goes to college. Anyway I am planning to get married soon and would like my dad to come to the wedding. He lives in Lima. What are the chances my dad would be granted a visitor's visa to come to my wedding? I only need him here for a couple of weeks not even a month. He would stay in my apartment. And how much would the application cost?


Well the issue is that the length of the stay doesn't matter. They don't issue a visa for a few weeks. So that doesn't help. The cost initally is to make the appointment. If you don't get the visa they keep the money. You can send an invite and he can get the paperwork done. There are places in front of the embassy to help if he needs it. No one can give you chances. I say.....try it. The cost is around $150. So if you can afford to lose that amount then that's all you'd be out if it doesn't happen and if it does.......how wonderful! Good luck. I feel for you.
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Re: US Visa explained (slightly) -- 80% rejected

Postby naturegirl » Wed Jan 06, 2010 5:40 pm

Has anyone tried to get a transit, C1 visa?

Whta's needed? Just a ticket to where you'll be going? No visa is needed for Korea, so my husband could simply go as a tourist., but he needs to go through the US, if possible.
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Re: US Visa explained (slightly) -- 80% rejected

Postby Arroz con Pollo » Thu Jan 07, 2010 10:59 am

If you are married I imagine it's a lot easier. On the other hand, if you have a girlfriend she is better off not even mentioning the fact that she has a US citizen love interest. He or she needs to get a visa on their own merits. I've heard of people with no ties to Peru, no bank account, no credit cards getting tourist visas and then licensed psychologists who own property getting denied. It seems quite random to me.

I was thinking of signing my girlfriend up for a Yemen based Al Queda training camp so I can get her a US visa. I'll have her dad call up the US embassy to seal the deal.
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Re: US Visa explained (slightly) -- 80% rejected

Postby LauraMH » Thu Jan 07, 2010 11:09 am

Arroz con Pollo wrote:If you are married I imagine it's a lot easier. On the other hand, if you have a girlfriend she is better off not even mentioning the fact that she has a US citizen love interest. He or she needs to get a visa on their own merits. I've heard of people with no ties to Peru, no bank account, no credit cards getting tourist visas and then licensed psychologists who own property getting denied. It seems quite random to me.

I was thinking of signing my girlfriend up for a Yemen based Al Queda training camp so I can get her a US visa. I'll have her dad call up the US embassy to seal the deal.


you are unfortunatly correct and although joking. that is the sad reality of the world we find ourselves. no logic. no fairness. so aribitrary. it is maddening to me.
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Re: US Visa explained (slightly) -- 80% rejected

Postby mahou123 » Thu Jan 07, 2010 11:37 am

It is also only a matter of time before someone tries to blow up a plane in the US by smuggling explosives on board up their bottom part. Explosive underwear already happened. So, for the safety of America, every US-bound passenger will be thoroughfully physically examined, to make sure they don´t have explosives on, or in them. Getting a visa will be only a start of this process :lol:

Why not just going to Brazil instead, Peruvians need only DNI to get in, not even a passport required. You can get connecting flights there, and it is a much better place to visit.
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Re: US Visa explained (slightly) -- 80% rejected

Postby rama0929 » Fri Feb 12, 2010 2:33 pm

LauraMH wrote:I say.....try it. The cost is around $150. So if you can afford to lose that amount then that's all you'd be out if it doesn't happen and if it does.......how wonderful!


This is the mindset I have.

I would like to invite my taxista friend and his wife to visit me in the US.

They have property in Peru
They have children and grandchildren in Peru
She's a homemaker (though she does have a jewelry booth in a mercado), he drives a Taxi
He served in the Navy
They have their savings
They have no interest in staying in the US.

I have no idea of their odds, because it seems totally random to me.

Whatever happens happens, but $150 is a small price to pay and given all that they've done for me, it's the least I can do.
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Re: US Visa explained (slightly) -- 80% rejected

Postby LauraMH » Fri Feb 19, 2010 9:59 am

We did get the visa and have been in the US visiting for a week now and having a fantastic time. It was amazing to me that it seems the majority of people I saw while waiting for my husband at DHL did get the visa. A single girl in her 20's. A family of 5 and such. It was really surprising. It sure didn't seem like 80% rejected that day. In his group of 5, 4 were accepted.
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Re: US Visa explained (slightly) -- 80% rejected

Postby inscop » Tue Feb 23, 2010 11:59 pm

This is not to directed to anyone in particular, simply an opinion.

This string has been interesting reading, but thus far no one has pointed out the fact that SOME of the very people who participate in this forum are illegal aliens themselves. The only difference is they are illegally in Peru instead of another country. How many posts have you read in the past about border-hopping or sending your passport to Ecuador with a courier to get it stamped? How many posts about other methods of staying in the country without the proper documents have you seen?

If you are legally in Peru, you know that I am not talking about you, but I'll bet you have friends and associates who are not in the country with the right papers. Somehow, we forget that these laws apply to us.

I don't have a clue what the problem is with the staff at the US Embassy in Lima. Perhaps they are just jaded by the sheer amount of applications and the lies that they have to listen to. It must get to a point where they think that everyone is a potential illegal alien. Even those who have all the right documentation can trigger a denial based on whatever little reason they give the officer. I am not going to fault them without having experience in doing what they do. I feel certain it is not a pleasant job.
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Re: US Visa explained (slightly) -- 80% rejected

Postby Kelly » Wed Feb 24, 2010 1:50 am

While there are, I'm sure, many people living in Peru illegally on expired visas, I'd like to point out that border hopping, in and of itself, is not illegal. It may be a way of gaming the system, but as long as you have those legal stamps on your passport, obtained legally by passing through a border, you are not an illegal alien.
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Re: US Visa explained (slightly) -- 80% rejected

Postby cetina05 » Thu Jan 13, 2011 6:20 pm

I have a question and hopefully you can answer this ASAP...

Im an US citizen living in Lima, Peru...

My visa is about to expire in Feb. 20th of 2011

Flying out of the country and back is too expensive...

Taking a bus to Ecuador and back has been done before, but very tiring and exhausting, and a lil dangerous...

My question is...

If my visa expire late Feb, and I plan on leaving Peru on Mid March to go to the states for a month till mid April... I know I will have to pay some fees, which I'm fine with, because I'm assuming it will be from $30-$60... When I leave in March...

My question is, when I leave in March with my EXPIRED visa..... in April, would I be let back in to Peru, or would they look down on me because I had an expired visa before and would not let me in?....

I was told that when you leave on a expired visa, the next time you try to enter you wont be let back in.
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Re: US Visa explained (slightly) -- 80% rejected

Postby LauraMH » Thu Jan 13, 2011 10:27 pm

unless I am missing something......you are fine.

Pay the fine for the days you are over. $1 for each day over or take a quick trip to Arica, Chile. This can be done in 1-2 days and fairly inexpensive, but unless you want to visit Arica, it's about the same to just pay the fine. You shouldn't have an issue on reentry. I have never heard of that before.
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Re: US Visa explained (slightly) -- 80% rejected

Postby cetina05 » Thu Jan 13, 2011 11:06 pm

ah ok....Yeah


I definitely want to AVOID making the bus trip anywhere....

I dont mind paying the fines

But im concerned about not being able to come back in to Peru in mid April.... Would I be able to come back in?
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Re: US Visa explained (slightly) -- 80% rejected

Postby Kelly » Thu Jan 13, 2011 11:44 pm

While technically it is possible that they could refuse to let you back in, I've never heard of it happening to anyone. i wouldn't worry about it.
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Re: US Visa explained (slightly) -- 80% rejected

Postby americorps » Fri Jan 14, 2011 10:27 am

There are cheaper ways to cross the border as well.

I got a round trip to Tacna for $88, you can find decent hostals for 30-40 soles and cross the border and back for $5 if you do the train.

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