Teaching Music

Answers to your qestions about moving to, and living in, Peru,
southbound_drummer
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Teaching Music

Postby southbound_drummer » Thu Jan 02, 2014 9:18 am

Hey all, I thought I'd start with a post here to see if anyone can point me to a better place to list this.
I'm a musician/drummer and educator and I've just moved to Barranco from Boulder, Colorado. Because of weight limits, I don't have any of my drumming equipment with me except for a few pairs of sticks and a practice pad. But I would like to try to "break into" teaching drums here in southern Lima. Here's my quick and dirty sales pitch:
"Hello there,
My name is Danny. I live in the Barranco district in Lima. I'm a drummer and composer. I've been playing for 18 years and teaching lessons in the states for the last 7. I have two bachelor's degrees from the University of Colorado; one in percussion performance (BM) and one in Music education (BME). I can teach beginning through advanced levels; drum set, snare drum, timpani, xylophone/mallets, sight reading and music theory. Learn to play rock, hip-hop, country, jazz, salsa, reggae, classical or pop."


Best case scenario would be for me to go to the house who has drums and do the lessons for something like S/. 50 an hour. Not sure where to advertise, but I figured Mira Flores is a good start. Any ideas? Anyone know any aspiring drummers who need help? My spanish is improving daily, but will be challenging if the student doesn't speak english. But I will teach anyone.

Thanks for reading! Hope everyone had a grand New Year's and you didn't get a bottle rocket in the eye.

Chau!


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chi chi
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Re: Teaching Music

Postby chi chi » Thu Jan 02, 2014 6:57 pm

southbound_drummer wrote:Best case scenario would be for me to go to the house who has drums and do the lessons for something like S/. 50 an hour. Not sure where to advertise, but I figured Mira Flores is a good start.


S/.50 an hour is a lot of money in Peru. Most people have to work the whole day for S/.25 a day. Many Peruvians even make far less than that.

Building a solid customer base will take time and patience. And find people who will really pay will be a challenge too. Because in Peru, most people pay you tomorrow, next week or when they get their paycheck. (With other words, they will never pay you.)

If your spanish is bad then it will be hard too as very few Peruvians speak English. Miraflores is a tough place to do business as many licences will be required and you will need a permit from migraciones to do business.

It sounds that you are very ambitious. That's very good but you will need a lot of patience as well.
teamoperu
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Re: Teaching Music

Postby teamoperu » Fri Jan 03, 2014 5:44 am

Once saw 4 folks playing the bongos in a park in San Isidro. One looked like the teacher, all looked like they were having fun. Figured they were doing it in the park because practicing in a house might be a tad bothersome to neighbours. Just sharing in case it sparks an idea for you.
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Alan
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Re: Teaching Music

Postby Alan » Fri Jan 03, 2014 9:34 pm

chi chi wrote:
southbound_drummer wrote:Best case scenario would be for me to go to the house who has drums and do the lessons for something like S/. 50 an hour. Not sure where to advertise, but I figured Mira Flores is a good start.


S/.50 an hour is a lot of money in Peru. Most people have to work the whole day for S/.25 a day. Many Peruvians even make far less than that.


It's true, it's a lot of money for many, but it is a reasonable price. A few guitar teachers I know charge $20 or $25 an hour. The drum-teacher market may be different.

Good luck!
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Re: Teaching Music

Postby TShadow » Sat Jan 04, 2014 4:56 pm

That's true, a friend of mine who teaches piano is also charging S20 an hour.

The only problem is that she has to go to the customers, and that means for teaching 3 hours a day she stays out for the whole day traveling with Taxis and Micros and therefore her expenses are also quite high, as customers who can pay this kind of amount are normally from the upper middle class and want you to come to their place.
mirage
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Re: Teaching Music

Postby mirage » Wed Jan 08, 2014 9:23 pm

There are plenty of people, parents, children, musicians who can afford you and pay even more. And if you are really good like it sounds, you should do well. The problem is getting to the people who need you. How about group classes, that would enable you to advertise your services to get private students as well.

Good luck!!!
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Re: Teaching Music

Postby AETM » Sun Jan 26, 2014 2:26 pm

Hi
A friend of mine is making a very decent living teaching music. He has found a niche in wealthy kids in high school and university age. He started with one and now has a base of around 20. He is Peruvian but he never studied music formally.
I think not knowing spanish should not be a problem in this niche. All the wealthy schools teach English. And more than Miraflores, this market is in La Molina.

I'm in a different segment. I am a young professional that likes music as a hobby and can pay for private lessons. There are many like me and we are in Miraflores, San Isidro and Surco. I was looking for singing lessons the other day. I found a couple of nice looking facebook pages that made me call to enquire. I also went to Barranco and entered a few cafes. I saw some cool looking ads that caught my eye. I didn't notice those without a decent and arty design. I couldn't find lessons because they were full already.

All the best

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