Electricity prices

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Sergio Bernales
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Electricity prices

Postby Sergio Bernales » Thu Jul 03, 2014 10:46 am

Out of curiosity, what do people pay each month for electricity? Either overall or just per kW.h? Is it a different rate in each part of Peru?


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Re: Electricity prices

Postby ironchefchris » Thu Jul 03, 2014 10:51 am

Sociedad Eléctrica del Sur Oeste (SEAL) in Arequipa:

S/. 0.4551per kW.h
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adrian Thorne
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Re: Electricity prices

Postby adrian Thorne » Thu Jul 03, 2014 11:03 am

Luz Del Sur in La Molina

S/ 0.3872 KW
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Re: Electricity prices

Postby panman » Thu Jul 03, 2014 12:31 pm

edelnor in San Miguel.
S/. 0.3718 KW
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Re: Electricity prices

Postby teamoperu » Thu Jul 03, 2014 1:13 pm

Piura. Electro Norte. 0.4790 KWh. Means about 54 soles for 30 day month.
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Re: Electricity prices

Postby Sergio Bernales » Thu Jul 03, 2014 1:24 pm

Interesting, thanks everyone. I'm paying 0.3861 in Miraflores. So no great difference, although Lima looks like it's cheaper than Piura and Arequipa. Apparently, electricity is almost given away free in a certain jungle paradise and people in Miraflores and San Isidro are meant to be charged the most. Now, why did I doubt that that might not be true?
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Re: Electricity prices

Postby argidd » Sat Jul 05, 2014 12:01 am

Interesting topic. In Mordor AKA Ica, we paid 25 soles, or something along those lines. In Miraflores we pay 130 aprox when the maid doen't do too many loads of laundry.
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chi chi
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Re: Electricity prices

Postby chi chi » Sat Jul 05, 2014 7:26 pm

Lowest bill this year was 20 soles, highest bill was 39 soles. Just got my bill for July: 33 soles
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Re: Electricity prices

Postby Sergio Bernales » Sat Jul 05, 2014 10:45 pm

chi chi wrote:Lowest bill this year was 20 soles, highest bill was 39 soles. Just got my bill for July: 33 soles


Well done for keeping the prices down, but what are you paying per kwh?
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Re: Electricity prices

Postby chi chi » Sat Jul 05, 2014 11:06 pm

Sergio Bernales wrote:
chi chi wrote:Lowest bill this year was 20 soles, highest bill was 39 soles. Just got my bill for July: 33 soles


Well done for keeping the prices down, but what are you paying per kwh?


I just checked the bill and it says 0.34

I don't understand why Peru isn't full of solar panels.
People will get electricity for free.
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Re: Electricity prices

Postby Sergio Bernales » Sun Jul 06, 2014 1:31 am

chi chi wrote:
Sergio Bernales wrote:
chi chi wrote:Lowest bill this year was 20 soles, highest bill was 39 soles. Just got my bill for July: 33 soles


Well done for keeping the prices down, but what are you paying per kwh?


I just checked the bill and it says 0.34

I don't understand why Peru isn't full of solar panels.
People will get electricity for free.


So in the same ball park as Lima, but slightly cheaper. Any tips for keeping the bills down? You seem to do a good job.

I agree, Peru would be a great place for solar panels, particularly the desert coastal regions. At the moment Peru relies too much on hydro, which is itself in danger because of melting glaciers.

Investment, maintenance of the panels, connection to the network and continued investment in rural electrification means it will never be economically viable to give away electricity free. It would require an enormous public subsidy. At the moment, although improving, the technology still hasn't made solar panels as competitively priced as most fossil fuels, but in a few years that may change. In very sunny desert areas, where there's easy connection to a grid and a large cities nearby, it's already proving competitive.

One possibility with solar panels could be un-metered electricity. It would work like broadband, where you pay a set monthly fee for as much electricity as you want. The fee covers maintenance of the network, investment, salaries, pensions, etc.
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Re: Electricity prices

Postby chi chi » Sun Jul 06, 2014 2:26 am

Sergio Bernales wrote:So in the same ball park as Lima, but slightly cheaper. Any tips for keeping the bills down? You seem to do a good job.


I don't know what I do different than other people.

TV and laptop are on all day.
Ouside lights are on all night.

We have fridge, waterpump for watertank, washer, dryer and some other things.

Ventiladores are on all day and night as well.

People who spend more than 40 soles a month must be using powertools, vacuumcleaners, threadmill all day long or washing clothes a few times a day.
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Re: Electricity prices

Postby ironchefchris » Sun Jul 06, 2014 10:16 am

Wind power. These guys are active in Peru.

http://windaid.org/about-us/
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Re: Electricity prices

Postby panman » Sun Jul 06, 2014 11:25 am

We were at a hotel in Ica last weekend, and they had solar water heaters installed on the roof.
Great idea but, as I said to my wife, I wonder how long they'd stay on your roof in Lima?
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Re: Electricity prices

Postby teamoperu » Sun Jul 06, 2014 11:27 am

Even more interesting, in Ayabaca they pay 20-30 soles per month but outside Ayabaca in the sierras they pay 8 soles / month!
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Re: Electricity prices

Postby teamoperu » Sun Jul 06, 2014 11:37 am

Sergio Bernales wrote:
chi chi wrote:
Sergio Bernales wrote:
chi chi wrote:Lowest bill this year was 20 soles, highest bill was 39 soles. Just got my bill for July: 33 soles


Well done for keeping the prices down, but what are you paying per kwh?


I just checked the bill and it says 0.34

I don't understand why Peru isn't full of solar panels.
People will get electricity for free.


So in the same ball park as Lima, but slightly cheaper. Any tips for keeping the bills down? You seem to do a good job.

I agree, Peru would be a great place for solar panels, particularly the desert coastal regions. At the moment Peru relies too much on hydro, which is itself in danger because of melting glaciers.

Investment, maintenance of the panels, connection to the network and continued investment in rural electrification means it will never be economically viable to give away electricity free. It would require an enormous public subsidy. At the moment, although improving, the technology still hasn't made solar panels as competitively priced as most fossil fuels, but in a few years that may change. In very sunny desert areas, where there's easy connection to a grid and a large cities nearby, it's already proving competitive.

One possibility with solar panels could be un-metered electricity. It would work like broadband, where you pay a set monthly fee for as much electricity as you want. The fee covers maintenance of the network, investment, salaries, pensions, etc.


And in the sierras there are some communities still without electricity. We have helped with solar panels, after the initial investment, free. The technology and prices are quite OK now.
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Re: Electricity prices

Postby Sergio Bernales » Sun Jul 06, 2014 12:09 pm

teamoperu wrote:
Sergio Bernales wrote:
chi chi wrote:
Sergio Bernales wrote:
chi chi wrote:Lowest bill this year was 20 soles, highest bill was 39 soles. Just got my bill for July: 33 soles


Well done for keeping the prices down, but what are you paying per kwh?


I just checked the bill and it says 0.34

I don't understand why Peru isn't full of solar panels.
People will get electricity for free.


So in the same ball park as Lima, but slightly cheaper. Any tips for keeping the bills down? You seem to do a good job.

I agree, Peru would be a great place for solar panels, particularly the desert coastal regions. At the moment Peru relies too much on hydro, which is itself in danger because of melting glaciers.

Investment, maintenance of the panels, connection to the network and continued investment in rural electrification means it will never be economically viable to give away electricity free. It would require an enormous public subsidy. At the moment, although improving, the technology still hasn't made solar panels as competitively priced as most fossil fuels, but in a few years that may change. In very sunny desert areas, where there's easy connection to a grid and a large cities nearby, it's already proving competitive.

One possibility with solar panels could be un-metered electricity. It would work like broadband, where you pay a set monthly fee for as much electricity as you want. The fee covers maintenance of the network, investment, salaries, pensions, etc.


And in the sierras there are some communities still without electricity. We have helped with solar panels, after the initial investment, free. The technology and prices are quite OK now.


If an NGO or government provides the initial investment, it definitely works well for individual homes and small isolated communities. And is a great investment that can visibly help poor communities.

The investment doesn't always look so great if a poor community is already joined to the grid, but cannot afford the prices. In those instances, it usually proves cheaper subsidising electricity produced from fossil fuels for communities than it is investing in solar panels, but that is changing. The Chinese are now producing cheaper solar panels in large quantities and their Western counterparts are trying out new materials that work more efficiently and cost less to produce.

There is, however, one advantage of linking small communities to a grid and investing in solar panels - if the solar panels produce surplus electricity, it can then be sold back to the utility companies and provide a source of income to the community.
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Re: Electricity prices

Postby caliguy » Tue Jul 08, 2014 9:28 am

adrian Thorne wrote:Luz Del Sur in La Molina

S/ 0.3872 KW

exact same rate and provider in La Victoria
every place has it's own spirit. you just need to tune into it.
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Re: Electricity prices

Postby mickd » Wed Jul 09, 2014 5:59 am

We have received the electricity bill for March 2014 and it is from,

edelnor serving San Isidro and is Precio Unitario S/. KWh 0.334
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Re: Electricity prices

Postby Danny55 » Thu Jul 10, 2014 11:04 am

with Luz del Sur in El Sol de La Molina we are paying 0.3872 KWh

Before our baby was born we were paying about 95 to 100 soles a month, with the baby the bill has risen to 135 to 140 soles per month.
I figure the change is mainly caused from heating more water with the electrical hot water tank, we also increased the amount of hot water for ourselves.
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Re: Electricity prices

Postby chi chi » Thu Jul 10, 2014 2:05 pm

Danny55 wrote:with Luz del Sur in El Sol de La Molina we are paying 0.3872 KWh

Before our baby was born we were paying about 95 to 100 soles a month, with the baby the bill has risen to 135 to 140 soles per month.
I figure the change is mainly caused from heating more water with the electrical hot water tank, we also increased the amount of hot water for ourselves.


You will save a lot of money if you install a wáter heater that works on gas.

Same with cooking. Cooking on gas is much cheaper.
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Re: Electricity prices

Postby Sergio Bernales » Thu Jul 10, 2014 2:52 pm

chi chi wrote:
Danny55 wrote:with Luz del Sur in El Sol de La Molina we are paying 0.3872 KWh

Before our baby was born we were paying about 95 to 100 soles a month, with the baby the bill has risen to 135 to 140 soles per month.
I figure the change is mainly caused from heating more water with the electrical hot water tank, we also increased the amount of hot water for ourselves.


You will save a lot of money if you install a wáter heater that works on gas.

Same with cooking. Cooking on gas is much cheaper.


I've also seen tumble dryers, washing machines and a few other domestic appliances that run off gas. Certainly, these portable gas heaters are probably the best way to heat your homes now that winter is here. My first winter in Lima I had an electrical heater that wasn't much good and only heated a small area around it, while doubling my electricity bill.
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Re: Electricity prices

Postby marlia » Thu Jul 10, 2014 3:26 pm

Edelnor in San Martin de Porres, Lima

S/. 0.396 kWh --> June 2014
S/. 0.395 kWh --> May 2014
S/. 0.3871 kWh --> April 2014
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Re: Electricity prices

Postby chi chi » Thu Jul 10, 2014 3:39 pm

marlia wrote:Edelnor in San Martin de Porres, Lima

S/. 0.396 kWh --> June 2014
S/. 0.395 kWh --> May 2014
S/. 0.3871 kWh --> April 2014


Sounds like electricity is expensive in the ''hood''.

They probably have to charge the cost of the copper cables that get stolen overnight to their customers.
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Re: Electricity prices

Postby teamoperu » Thu Jul 10, 2014 5:10 pm

Sergio Bernales wrote:
chi chi wrote:
Danny55 wrote:with Luz del Sur in El Sol de La Molina we are paying 0.3872 KWh

Before our baby was born we were paying about 95 to 100 soles a month, with the baby the bill has risen to 135 to 140 soles per month.
I figure the change is mainly caused from heating more water with the electrical hot water tank, we also increased the amount of hot water for ourselves.


You will save a lot of money if you install a wáter heater that works on gas.

Same with cooking. Cooking on gas is much cheaper.


I've also seen tumble dryers, washing machines and a few other domestic appliances that run off gas. Certainly, these portable gas heaters are probably the best way to heat your homes now that winter is here. My first winter in Lima I had an electrical heater that wasn't much good and only heated a small area around it, while doubling my electricity bill.


Seen some appliances that run off a battery charged by solar.
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Re: Electricity prices

Postby chi chi » Thu Jul 10, 2014 5:18 pm

teamoperu wrote:Seen some appliances that run off a battery charged by solar.


In SODIMAC, they sell garden lights that charge during the day by sunlight and they give light during the night.
I bought them at my previous home but they aren't good quality. Within less tan 2 years, I had to replace them all.
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Re: Electricity prices

Postby amigorick » Fri Jul 11, 2014 4:04 pm

Look's like I'm going to take the cake on this one. We pay S/. 0.5577 per kWh :cry:
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Re: Electricity prices

Postby chi chi » Fri Jul 11, 2014 4:08 pm

amigorick wrote:Look's like I'm going to take the cake on this one. We pay S/. 0.5577 per kWh :cry:


Everything is more expensive in Iquitos.
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Re: Electricity prices

Postby chi chi » Sat Jul 12, 2014 5:25 am

Sergio Bernales wrote:My first winter in Lima I had an electrical heater that wasn't much good and only heated a small area around it, while doubling my electricity bill.


I am not surprised. All homes in Peru have single glazing.

Imagine having single glazing in Canada or Northern Europe. In the winter, you will get a heart attack when the electricity bill arrives.
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Re: Electricity prices

Postby Sergio Bernales » Sat Jul 12, 2014 2:19 pm

chi chi wrote:
Sergio Bernales wrote:My first winter in Lima I had an electrical heater that wasn't much good and only heated a small area around it, while doubling my electricity bill.


I am not surprised. All homes in Peru have single glazing.

Imagine having single glazing in Canada or Northern Europe. In the winter, you will get a heart attack when the electricity bill arrives.


Actually, only about 20% of heat loss is caused through poor glazing. Most people would be better off insulating lofts and cavity walls and sealing doors for big heat savings. The biggest advantage to double glazing in Peru I think would be reduced noise pollution.

http://life.gaiam.com/article/5-tricks- ... -heat-loss

http://theenergycollective.com/lindsay- ... -heat-loss

Also most homes aren't heated by electricity in Europe, rather gas, and even where they are, most central heating systems are reasonably efficient compared to small electric heaters.
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Re: Electricity prices

Postby teamoperu » Sat Jul 12, 2014 6:06 pm

Sergio Bernales wrote:
chi chi wrote:
Sergio Bernales wrote:My first winter in Lima I had an electrical heater that wasn't much good and only heated a small area around it, while doubling my electricity bill.


I am not surprised. All homes in Peru have single glazing.

Imagine having single glazing in Canada or Northern Europe. In the winter, you will get a heart attack when the electricity bill arrives.


Actually, only about 20% of heat loss is caused through poor glazing. Most people would be better off insulating lofts and cavity walls and sealing doors for big heat savings. The biggest advantage to double glazing in Peru I think would be reduced noise pollution.

http://life.gaiam.com/article/5-tricks- ... -heat-loss

http://theenergycollective.com/lindsay- ... -heat-loss

Also most homes aren't heated by electricity in Europe, rather gas, and even where they are, most central heating systems are reasonably efficient compared to small electric heaters.


Thanks, Sergio, for the facts. I thought worrying about double glazing seemed a bit odd when the windows are not sealed and under door spaces let the air in freely.

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