What does Peru need?

Answers to your qestions about moving to, and living in, Peru,
woodchuck
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What does Peru need?

Postby woodchuck » Tue Apr 26, 2016 1:18 pm

A friend of mine will retire in January & is considering business opportunities in Peru.
He plans to start with $50,000 or less & see what happens.
What new businesses does Peru need, or businesses that can handle more competition?
I realize that isn't a lot of money, but any suggestions would be appreciated. :roll:


ironchefchris
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Re: What does Peru need?

Postby ironchefchris » Tue Apr 26, 2016 2:24 pm

Soft pretzels. It's national pretzel day in the states and I have a craving. A nice selection at the mustard bar would be nice, but I'll take what I can get.
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Re: What does Peru need?

Postby woodchuck » Tue Apr 26, 2016 6:52 pm

Good suggestion!
I seem to remember that Jockey Plaza had a soft pretzel place. I don't know of any in MF.
I am not sure they still have, but I can check for my friend & get some contact info. :roll:
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Alan
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Re: What does Peru need?

Postby Alan » Tue Apr 26, 2016 8:00 pm

I don't know what your friends technical background is, but I have identified a need for a service company that provides web design / writing / translations directed towards the agro-export sector. This is a sector that is slated to keep growing (no pun intended), and most companies have web sites that are not responsive to mobile devices and have no translation (or limited or poor translation) to English.

It's an easy market to reach, since there are directories of companies that work in the sector. The potential provider of this service needs only to visit all the pages, make a fast analysis, and write/phone the companies that need to work done.

Good luck!
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Re: What does Peru need?

Postby western world » Wed Apr 27, 2016 11:49 am

Invest in mining Peru is the third largest producer of copper and zinc in the world is also a major producer of gold & silver.

Wayne
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Re: What does Peru need?

Postby ironchefchris » Wed Apr 27, 2016 1:36 pm

An employment agency for expats. It was suggested it might be a business opportunity for someone.
woodchuck wrote:With all the options in the Yellow Pages, there may be a few that cater to expats.
Anyone have any experience with any of these?
If not, that might be a business opportunity for someone. :roll:
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Re: What does Peru need?

Postby hatchepsut » Thu Apr 28, 2016 9:28 am

Any business could be succesfull in Peru.
But just like anywhere else in the world, prepare to work hard and put a lot of hours in the business.

$50000 is a lot of money. I would suggest to start a business with a lot less and see how it works out. If successful, you could invest more and extend the business.

But I advise to start a business in a field where you have experience in.

Many people start up a restaurant but they never work as a waiter and a cook themselves. 100% of them failed and lost their money.
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Re: What does Peru need?

Postby tupacperu » Thu Apr 28, 2016 7:07 pm

Alan wrote:I don't know what your friends technical background is, but I have identified a need for a service company that provides web design / writing / translations directed towards the agro-export sector. This is a sector that is slated to keep growing (no pun intended), and most companies have web sites that are not responsive to mobile devices and have no translation (or limited or poor translation) to English.

It's an easy market to reach, since there are directories of companies that work in the sector. The potential provider of this service needs only to visit all the pages, make a fast analysis, and write/phone the companies that need to work done.

Good luck!


Great idea Alan, I think we will run with it. My wife is getting her degree in translation and I have a background in IT and web services. Big plus, we live in Lambayeque's Agro region.
Retiring Sept 2016. Was lookingat a business project.

Thanks
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Alan
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Re: What does Peru need?

Postby Alan » Fri Apr 29, 2016 11:32 am

tupacperu wrote:
Alan wrote:I don't know what your friends technical background is, but I have identified a need for a service company that provides web design / writing / translations directed towards the agro-export sector. This is a sector that is slated to keep growing (no pun intended), and most companies have web sites that are not responsive to mobile devices and have no translation (or limited or poor translation) to English.

It's an easy market to reach, since there are directories of companies that work in the sector. The potential provider of this service needs only to visit all the pages, make a fast analysis, and write/phone the companies that need to work done.

Good luck!


Great idea Alan, I think we will run with it. My wife is getting her degree in translation and I have a background in IT and web services. Big plus, we live in Lambayeque's Agro region.
Retiring Sept 2016. Was lookingat a business project.

Thanks


Sounds like the perfect team!

You can start researching clients here. Just check out their pages and see which ones need work:
http://www.adexperu.org.pe/index.php/nuestros-socios

There is a more complete resource for sale here:
http://www.adexperu.org.pe/index.php/directorio-adex


Good luck with the project.
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Re: What does Peru need?

Postby victmanu » Sat Apr 30, 2016 3:33 pm

I am sorry but 50 thousand dollars is not a big ammount to invest but He can get connections in USA and export Cranberry pulp from Ica, Peru to USA,
Don't need to buy land or equipment. He can hire (outsurce) local companies to do the process to remove the pulp from the fruit and pack the pulp. He need to rent a warehouse and equipment to keep it frozen till the shipment of the product to USA or He can try to sell it in Peru to bars, restaurants, bakeries, Ice cream companies, also can make juice with that pulp or blend with Pisco and sell as a cocktail.
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Re: What does Peru need?

Postby FDiH » Sat Apr 30, 2016 4:19 pm

Alan wrote:I don't know what your friends technical background is, but I have identified a need for a service company that provides web design / writing / translations directed towards the agro-export sector. This is a sector that is slated to keep growing (no pun intended), and most companies have web sites that are not responsive to mobile devices and have no translation (or limited or poor translation) to English.

It's an easy market to reach, since there are directories of companies that work in the sector. The potential provider of this service needs only to visit all the pages, make a fast analysis, and write/phone the companies that need to work done.

Good luck!


It is really needed. Though the big players have (some sort) of website. The majority 1000+ companies do not have a website. My company (http://organiccrops.net) is one of the few companies with a 'modern' website that is mobile compliant.

The main issue for web developers and design agencies is that most companies do not (want to) invest in marketing. A typical SMB website costs
around US$ 3K-5K overseas. In Peru most companies are not willing to invest more than a few hundred PEN.

Same goes for the hospitality business. Most hotels do not have a decent website. Only the big chains have online reservation options.
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Re: What does Peru need?

Postby ironchefchris » Sun Aug 21, 2016 11:42 am

A company that provides services to the many expats living in Perú who only speak English and for whatever reasons can't get their wives/girl friends/friends to help them with filling out official forms from Migraciones, Sunat, Indecopi, etc., or are as proficient at using Google Translate as they are with Spanish. This service company could also provide translators to accompany these English only expats on their frequent trips to those government agencies, or even to the local bodega if they need to buy a Coca-Cola. The services could be expanded to target expats who only speak Portugese, German, French, etc., as they likely are a larger segment of the market of expats who won't learn Spanish (unless of course they do bother to learn Spanish after expatriating).

The number of English only expats is supposedly large enough to warrant having millions of Peruvians tax monies spent to make the necessary important changes to the longstanding system. Branches could be opened all over the country - anywhere there are offices for Migraciones, Sunat, Indecopi, etc.. Add in the Portugese only, German only, French only, etc., expats who can't be bothered with Spanish and this would obviously be a very lucrative business. Obviously this business could be expanded or franchised globally. If Perú has so many English only expats that it necessitates making the government accept English as well as Spanish, think of the potential market size of a country with even more expats, like Costa Rica, or the big prize - Mexico! It could be expanded to Asian countries where the languages, unlike Spanish, are harder to learn than English.

Set up a meeting with the President. Explain how this service won't cost the Peruvian government or Peruvian taxpayer a single centimo. The millions that would have been spent changing the government to a bilingual system could be saved or instead spent so as to actually benefit instead of cost the citizens of Perú. Because of this, and for creating jobs, you can ask PPK to grant tax abatements or perhaps exemptions.

Ca-Ching!
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Re: What does Peru need?

Postby woodchuck » Tue Sep 13, 2016 9:27 am

NO, what a convoluted reply!
To realize that epats are very valuable to Peru; if we have issues/suggestions - we should be heard.
Talked to a friend from CA; he tells me they use 3 languages for virtually everything.
This is showing - respect - for the expats until they become comfortable with English.
RESPECT - very simple! No need to re-invent the wheel! Thanks. :lol:
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Re: What does Peru need?

Postby ironchefchris » Tue Sep 13, 2016 12:20 pm

The US has no official language and is a nation founded by immigrants and with a long history of immigration from many countries all over the world. Perú has an official language and no history of significant immigration, so it's comparing apples to oranges.

I would think retooling the Peruvian government to operate in English as well as the official language would be such a large and costly endeavor that it would be the more accurate example of trying to "reinvent the wheel," when there's really no need. What language would be the next reinvention to the wheel? Portuguese? German? French? If you do for one foreign special interest group then others will demand equal treatment. Where does it end and at what financial and cultural cost?

I'd rather see taxpayer money go towards something that would benefit citizens, residents and Perú as a whole as opposed to something that would only benefit a minuscule number of foreign residents who refuse to adapt. In a developing country there's only so many things that can be funded. I'd bet dollars to doughnuts that if polled, Peruvians (voters) would overwhelmingly rather see their taxes spent on crime prevention, infrastructure, efforts to expand the economy, etc., instead of reinventing the wheel to solely benefit a minuscule foreign special interest group.

I'm curious as to what others think. No one I've spoken with, expat resident or Peruvian citizen thinks it's a good idea or is a proposal that stands a snowball's chance in hell. I can only speculate on PPK's administrastion's opinion, being they are a small minority in Congress and have far larger issues to deal with. There's a lot of convincing that would need to be done. Is this something that's meant to be taken seriously with a desire to be discussed seriously and efforts made to follow through, or is this just "wouldn't it be nice," wishful thinking? Whatever. If you're actually serious about this keep us updated on your progress as far as getting a meeting with PPK and your idea to retool how official government business is conducted.

I still think that if it's believed such a demand exists to the scale where it's necessary to retool the government, then that would suggest a belief that an opportunity exists for private enterprise to fill this need; which goes back to the subject of this thread. What does Perú need and what business could be created to fill this need? Why make the Peruvian taxpayer fund something so costly that would provide zero benefit to them when a private enterprise could fill this need and generate a profit? I don't see how that idea is convoluted at all, esp. compared to the complexity of retooling the cash strapped Peruvian govt. to start conducting official business in (potentially several) other languages. I would think someone who has gone through the beurocracy involved in starting at least four businesses in Perú would expect a convoluted process when it comes to making such a huge change to the government itself. I'm a realist. I wouldn't go into the idea of starting a business or trying to convincie the PPK administration (who in turn would have to convince Congress and the tax paying voters) to retool to be anything but a convoluted process.

imo, RESPECT is about adapting to the culture of ones voluntarily adopted home instead of trying to force a different culture on Perú and force the Peruvians to pay for it, since they've been kind enough to grant residence to those of us who are not citizens. I don't feel disrespected at all that official business is conducted only in the official language. But I knew long before voluntarily moving here that Spanish is the official language and that if I wanted to live here I'd need to both adapt to and RESPECT the culture at large and put the effort into improving my language skills. Why not just go to a language school or hire a translator and contribute to the economy instead of taking from the country/people while giving nothing of even near equal value in return? Colonialism without the violence.

In the spirit of an exchange of ideas and furthering a conversation (because that's how ideas are refined and change from ideas to reality) I'd welcome any comments that address any of these issues and concerns, whether they be criticisms of what I'm saying with a rebuttal pointing out how I'm wrong about how this need could be better served by the private sector and/or how this proposal could realistically be approached and accomplished. If you're at all serious, give us a dry run of your presentation and pretend we are PPK, Keiko's majority party and others in Congress who likely would be opposed, the average Peruvian taxpayer, newspaper editors and other people with influence, and put forth a convincing proposal that addresses our concerns and hesitations, because the "respect" argument lacks details that address the impracticalities of your suggestion. Give us an indication that you at least understand the political and financial prices of what your proposal entails. Give us concrete studies or evidence that this need actually exists to the degree you suggest it does because all we've seen so far is vague statements and anecdotal suggestions that likely wouldn't convince PPK or his cabinet that this is even a problem that needs adressing. If you truly believe in your idea at least attempt to make a convincing argument.
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Re: What does Peru need?

Postby Polaron » Tue Sep 13, 2016 12:55 pm

I'm with you on this one, Chef. To me expecting the nation as a whole to go way out of this way in order to accommodate I need buy a handful comparatively of people who aren't even citizens is the height of hubris.

Getting on to the presidency here and I hope I'm wrong but I don't think much is going to change at all. PPK will be able to do only what the fujimori people want done, and whatever that is Will greatlly favor big corporations and very wealthy people. In a few weeks or months time when the honeymoon is over and things haven't got any better people go back to being their old pessimistic selves.
Professional, bilingual writer at your service.
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Re: What does Peru need?

Postby ironchefchris » Tue Sep 13, 2016 1:17 pm

I don't get the PPK thing either, thinking he's a populist or will somehow be any different than his predecessors. I live in the South where he did well at the polls and no one I know who voted for him has much expectations that things will be different. Like the US election, PPK's support seemed to be more about voting against Keiko (Clinton/Trump) than actually supporting PPK. I wanted to see him win to be a counter balance to what looked like was going to be a Keiko party domination of Congress and because I thought his name would bring less memories of Alberto Fujimori than Keiko.

But what do these Peruvians know? They've only spent their entire lives living in Perú, dealing with the politics and politicians.

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