Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Answers to your qestions about moving to, and living in, Peru,
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DutchPat
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Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby DutchPat » Fri Jan 19, 2018 12:21 pm

Hi all,

First off, i have read many topics in this forum and there is a lot of valuable information here for which i thank you all. Like many stories, my interest in Peru began to grow since i have met a peruvian girl (28yo) in Europe. We've been talking for ages and have seen each other a couple of times. Words cannot describe which feelings i have for her, it's like being in love for the first time on elementary school. For this reason, i'm aware that i should keep my mind clear and not be deceived by the feelings of love. The feelings are mutual and we both know that having a long distance relationship is not something easy.

I live in the Netherlands and permanently employed in a good position. However, i'm not convinced that this job makes me happy at all. Because of this, the idea of moving to Peru and going on an adventure seems to attract me a lot. My idea is to move to Peru for an extended period of time, but not permanently. I do have some spare money and beyond my car i don't have any further obligations like a mortgage or something.

I'm curious what the possibilities there are for a 27 year old with a degree in commercial economics in Peru. Are there even possibilities or would you guys say i have a better chance at earning monthly income with teaching English? The latter seems quite the 'standard' go to for people who want to go abroad for an extended period of time.

Lets be real too, this is just some puppy love and it would seem mad to leave my career in the Netherlands to pursue a girl. But beyond that, i'm also looking for a way to escape the life i have now in the Netherlands. I'm working on my Spanish, currently it is very basic. I'm aware that having the ability to speak conversational Spanish is a must have.

Looking forward to your replies.


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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby mrsteak » Fri Jan 19, 2018 2:03 pm

DutchPat wrote:...
I live in the Netherlands and permanently employed in a good position. However, i'm not convinced that this job makes me happy at all. Because of this, the idea of moving to Peru and going on an adventure seems to attract me a lot. My idea is to move to Peru for an extended period of time, but not permanently. I do have some spare money and beyond my car i don't have any further obligations like a mortgage or something.


well, without fluent spanish skills it will be very hard for you to find any job in Peru. nobody here really speaks English (some of the peruvians just claim to speak english :mrgreen: ). If you find a job expect your salary to be around 2000-2500 soles maximum for the first 3-4 years. I would think it twice. Take into account that cost of living in Lima is around the same as Netherlands but the salaries are about 1/5 of the dutch salaries.

Moreover the immigration law changed recently to allow turists from EU to enter only for 90 days. So you will need a work or other visa to stay longer.
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby SilverbackPeru » Fri Jan 19, 2018 5:38 pm

Basically as stated you'll need to be able to speak fluent Spanish first if you want to get a job that pays enough for you to survive in Lima so you need to work on that. You could do an intensive course on arrival which will really help.

Living in Peru is extremely tough unless you get a job in natural resources, engineering or one of the few desired trades that Peru is short of. Even if you have a degree it doesn't guarantee that you'll get a high wage. You should with a degree be able to make $700 a month at leastin call centres, maybe $1000. (yes you usually need a university degree to apply for call center work here!!) $700 will get you by, $1000 will see you have a pretyy comfortable lifestyle.

English teaching will see you make around £900 a month. This will envolve you having to do four lessons a day for six days a week i would say (£10 a lesson). The hours can be long as you'll be teaching your first lesson at 8 or 9am and finishing the last a 8pm maybe. You'll have to travel across the city from lesson to lesson which is the hardest part. Aim for teaching in a school if i was you.

You should get a Celta certificate as these are regarded as the highest qualification to teach English, a TELF certificate is also good but not as rated as the Celta ( Cambridge University English Teaching Certificate).

I can't state how difficult Peru can be, even degrees don't guarantee you to get by here so bring plenty of savings.
Don't let the negative comments maybe put you off, you just have to be prepared for the fact it could turn out bad here, but it could also go well for you! You could end up having a really good time and living a good life in Mireflores. Just be prepared, have savings to back you up and a teaching certificate will mean you can always teach to get by.
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby mrsteak » Fri Jan 19, 2018 6:14 pm

Well describing the reality is not a negative comment!

You must understand one thing: unlike e.g. european countries, in Peru you cannot have a decent job and with your salary pay your rent, your car, your food and still have some money left to do the "normal" things. As stated cost of living is likely the same as Amsterdam if not higher, however salaries are around 1/4 - 1/5 of the dutch ones.

You will find yourself working for maybe 600 USD a month while the rent of a decent apartment in miraflores would be probably more than this. Otherwise you will find yourself living in a small room in shared bath apartment with 4 other foreigners and paying for this "comfort" maybe 200-250 USD. Or you will find yourself living in one of the suburbs living in a smelly slum apartment paying maybe 700-800 soles for it. Then you will have to commute 1.5-2hrs in heavy traffic every day taking a rotten smelly combi bursting from being full of people in same situation as you.

Otherwise you should plan to bring at least 250.000 USD (better 400.000-500.000USD) to Peru to buy your own apartment in a decent area and then maybe your salary will be just enough to pay for your food. And what is left from your "salary" your namorada will ask you to spend on her and her family...

There is nothing negative about it, it is just the reality in Peru. If someone tells you something else he is lying at you.
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby gerard » Fri Jan 19, 2018 6:34 pm

Would your employer consider letting you take a sabbatical or doing part-time telework for a few months to see how things worked out?
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby windsportinperu » Fri Jan 19, 2018 7:08 pm

Cost of living in Netherlands same as Peru ?

Some questions to the OP :

What city you are living now ?

Could you provide some data about the cost of living in Netherlands ? food (daily meals, fruits, vegetables, etc), transport (taxis and buses), fuel, gas, electricity, tap water, cellphone, internet, rents, clothing, medicine, health care, studies, movies, taxes!, etc. This way we could check if the cost is the same in Lima (or any other city in Peru) vs the cost of living in Netherlands..
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby mrsteak » Fri Jan 19, 2018 7:32 pm

windsportinperu wrote:Cost of living in Netherlands same as Peru ?


As I say you cannot compare the averages. That would be comparing apples and oranges! What you can compare: what you need to spend in Lima to have a lifestyle close to your lifestyle in Holland? That would mean you have to live in best parts of Miraflores or San Isidro with all the expensive stuff around!

If you move to San Juan de Lurigancho of course you will spend less than in Holland but is that what the TO means??? I hardly doubt it.
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby SilverbackPeru » Fri Jan 19, 2018 7:46 pm

windsportinperu wrote:Cost of living in Netherlands same as Peru ?

Some questions to the OP :

What city you are living now ?

Could you provide some data about the cost of living in Netherlands ? food (daily meals, fruits, vegetables, etc), transport (taxis and buses), fuel, gas, electricity, tap water, cellphone, internet, rents, clothing, medicine, health care, studies, movies, taxes!, etc. This way we could check if the cost is the same in Lima (or any other city in Peru) vs the cost of living in Netherlands..


I'd say that costs for many things in Lima will be almost the same price as the Netherlands if it's anything like the U.K. It will be cheaper in the poorer parts of Lima but do you want to live there? Also you have to compare income against expenses and how much disposible cash you are left with.

Just as an example of where I'm at....
Two bedroom apartment £350 - £400 per month.

Three bedroom £475 - £550

Utilities, electric and water £10 a week each using smart meters

Mobile: £22 per month for 40gig internet and unlimited calls and texts.

Council tax £120 a month

Restaurant meal £15 - £25 (£10 is easy to find)

Groceries for the day - maybe £10 tops

Quick meals for dinner breaks at work - you won't really pay more than £5

Tank of fuel £50 - £60

Car Insurance - business rate £44 a month

Healthcare - free

Education - free

University - you only pay your univerdity fees back if you make over £32'000 a year. Free in Scotland.

Medicine - not usually more than £5 or £10. Free or almost if you are unemployed.

Wage for me is between £530 - £650 a week. (Wages in Lima maybe $700).

I know it sounds like Mr Steak is bull $h!tting but you do have to take into account that we aren't getting @r$e f***ed by capitalism as much as our fellow expats from North America, so saying things are probably cheaper in Holland could well be a real possibility.
Last edited by SilverbackPeru on Fri Jan 19, 2018 7:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby DutchPat » Fri Jan 19, 2018 7:49 pm

mrsteak wrote:
DutchPat wrote:...
I live in the Netherlands and permanently employed in a good position. However, i'm not convinced that this job makes me happy at all. Because of this, the idea of moving to Peru and going on an adventure seems to attract me a lot. My idea is to move to Peru for an extended period of time, but not permanently. I do have some spare money and beyond my car i don't have any further obligations like a mortgage or something.


well, without fluent spanish skills it will be very hard for you to find any job in Peru. nobody here really speaks English (some of the peruvians just claim to speak english :mrgreen: ). If you find a job expect your salary to be around 2000-2500 soles maximum for the first 3-4 years. I would think it twice. Take into account that cost of living in Lima is around the same as Netherlands but the salaries are about 1/5 of the dutch salaries.

Moreover the immigration law changed recently to allow turists from EU to enter only for 90 days. So you will need a work or other visa to stay longer.

Thanks for the tip on the visa. I'll get back to the cost of living in the Netherlands in my last reply.

SilverbackPeru wrote:Basically as stated you'll need to be able to speak fluent Spanish first if you want to get a job that pays enough for you to survive in Lima so you need to work on that. You could do an intensive course on arrival which will really help.

Living in Peru is extremely tough unless you get a job in natural resources, engineering or one of the few desired trades that Peru is short of. Even if you have a degree it doesn't guarantee that you'll get a high wage. You should with a degree be able to make $700 a month at leastin call centres, maybe $1000. (yes you usually need a university degree to apply for call center work here!!) $700 will get you by, $1000 will see you have a pretyy comfortable lifestyle.

English teaching will see you make around £900 a month. This will envolve you having to do four lessons a day for six days a week i would say (£10 a lesson). The hours can be long as you'll be teaching your first lesson at 8 or 9am and finishing the last a 8pm maybe. You'll have to travel across the city from lesson to lesson which is the hardest part. Aim for teaching in a school if i was you.

You should get a Celta certificate as these are regarded as the highest qualification to teach English, a TELF certificate is also good but not as rated as the Celta ( Cambridge University English Teaching Certificate).

I can't state how difficult Peru can be, even degrees don't guarantee you to get by here so bring plenty of savings.
Don't let the negative comments maybe put you off, you just have to be prepared for the fact it could turn out bad here, but it could also go well for you! You could end up having a really good time and living a good life in Mireflores. Just be prepared, have savings to back you up and a teaching certificate will mean you can always teach to get by.

Thanks for info and the comment about a Celta certificate. Having read this and the experience of TEFL/Celta teachers i think my best bet would be to teach English instead of working in my native field of work which is marketing/business development in IT.

gerard wrote:Would your employer consider letting you take a sabbatical or doing part-time telework for a few months to see how things worked out?

This is actually something which have crossed my mind but having read about the rather slow internet speed i thought this was not really a viable option. I can indeed do like 80% of the work i'm doing now from home but having a decent and stable internet connection is a must for this.

I haven't talked to my employer yet about the possibility, but i think my employer rather haves me for a couple of hours a week instead of leaving the company entirely.

What are some good providers in Peru,? I've read about Movistar and the fact the providers only have to guarantee 10% of the advertised speed.

windsportinperu wrote:Cost of living in Netherlands same as Peru ?

Some questions to the OP :

What city you are living now ?

Could you provide some data about the cost of living in Netherlands ? food (daily meals, fruits, vegetables, etc), transport (taxis and buses), fuel, gas, electricity, tap water, cellphone, internet, rents, clothing, medicine, health care, studies, movies, taxes!, etc. This way we could check if the cost is the same in Lima (or any other city in Peru) vs the cost of living in Netherlands..


I currently live in Rotterdam. I think the cost of living is very dependant on life style but it could be interesting to compare.

    *Food €6-12 euro daily for 1 person (doing groceries and making my own lunch, eating somewhere is more expensive of course)
    *Public transport with buses, trams and metro's €0,90 base fare and €0,14 for each kilometre
    *Fuel is currently on €1,53 per litre for unleaded 95
    * Gas is €0,63 per cubic metre
    * Electricity is €0,20 per kWh
    * Water €1,10 for 300 cubic metre
    * Cellphone subscription €25 for unlimited calling/data
    * Internet ranges from €20 to €50 for fast speeds
    * Rents typically for my income between €500-800.
    * Health care insurance €92 for cheapest insurance company (basic med care)
    * Studies €1155 a year (intermediate vocational education) €1950 a year (higher vocational education) €2006 a year (university) Please keep in mind that these prices are for Dutch residents and the government pays the most of the education.
    * Movies around €12 for a ticket
    * Taxes depends but minimum required is a health care insurance and liability insurance (€3-5 a month)
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby mrsteak » Fri Jan 19, 2018 7:54 pm

SilverbackPeru wrote:I know it sounds like Mr Steak is bull $h!tting but you do have to take into account that we aren't getting @r$e f***ed by capitalism as much as our fellow expats from North America, so saying things are probably cheaper in Holland could well be a real possibility.


I can assure you that living e.g. in Spain or Portugal is FAR cheaper than Lima. Madrid may have similar cost of living as Lima, yes however hey then you are in Madrid!

My sister got married to a German and believe me when I visit her in Hamburg it is really freaking cheap. One basket full at the German ALDI, good for one week for a 3 person family will cost you maybe 50€. You will pay 600-700 soles at Wong for a comparable basket of goods. They pay for their nice 4 bedroom apartment 700€ with all utilities and also have a garden (and no barking dogs everywhere). Such lifestyle in Lima would cost you a fortune. I'm not gloryfying living in Germany - I would not move there for personal reasons, but lets just put clear what life in Lima is: a bag of crap.
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby DutchPat » Fri Jan 19, 2018 8:00 pm

SilverbackPeru wrote:
windsportinperu wrote:Cost of living in Netherlands same as Peru ?

Some questions to the OP :

What city you are living now ?

Could you provide some data about the cost of living in Netherlands ? food (daily meals, fruits, vegetables, etc), transport (taxis and buses), fuel, gas, electricity, tap water, cellphone, internet, rents, clothing, medicine, health care, studies, movies, taxes!, etc. This way we could check if the cost is the same in Lima (or any other city in Peru) vs the cost of living in Netherlands..


I'd say that costs for many things in Lima will be almost the same price as the Netherlands if it's anything like the U.K. It will be cheaper in the poorer parts of Lima but do you want to live there? Also you have to compare income against expenses and how much disposible cash you are left with.

Just as an example of where I'm at....
Two bedroom apartment £350 - £400 per month.

Three bedroom £475 - £550

Utilities, electric and water £10 a week each using smart meters

Mobile: £22 per month for 40gig internet and unlimited calls and texts.

Council tax £120 a month

Restaurant meal £15 - £25 (£10 is easy to find)

Groceries for the day - maybe £10 tops

Quick meals for dinner breaks at work - you won't really pay more than £5

Tank of fuel £50 - £60

Car Insurance - business rate £44 a month

Healthcare - free

Education - free

University - you only pay your univerdity fees back if you make over £32'000 a year. Free in Scotland.

Medicine - not usually more than £5 or £10. Free or almost if you are unemployed.

Wage for me is between £530 - £650 a week. (Wages in Lima maybe $700).

I know it sounds like Mr Steak is bull $h!tting but you do have to take into account that we aren't getting @r$e f***ed by capitalism as much as our fellow expats from North America, so saying things are probably cheaper in Holland could well be a real possibility.

It indeed looks like the daily expenses are pretty much on par. I'm guessing a rent of a three bedroom apartment for £475 - £550 would be in one of the nicer neighboorshoods in Lima or am i wrong?

Looking at your summary i would say living on a wage as an English teacher would be hard to come by. Exploring the possibility to work like 16 hours a week for my current employer would put me around €1100 a month.
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby DutchPat » Fri Jan 19, 2018 8:03 pm

mrsteak wrote:
SilverbackPeru wrote:I know it sounds like Mr Steak is bull $h!tting but you do have to take into account that we aren't getting @r$e f***ed by capitalism as much as our fellow expats from North America, so saying things are probably cheaper in Holland could well be a real possibility.


I can assure you that living e.g. in Spain or Portugal is FAR cheaper than Lima. Madrid may have similar cost of living as Lima, yes however hey then you are in Madrid!

My sister got married to a German and believe me when I visit her in Hamburg it is really freaking cheap. One basket full at the German ALDI, good for one week for a 3 person family will cost you maybe 50€. You will pay 600-700 soles at Wong for a comparable basket of goods. They pay for their nice 4 bedroom apartment 700€ with all utilities and also have a garden (and no barking dogs everywhere). Such lifestyle in Lima would cost you a fortune. I'm not gloryfying living in Germany - I would not move there for personal reasons, but lets just put clear what life in Lima is: a bag of crap.

I have to admit, it is indeed possible to do a full week of groces for just €50 at the Lidl or Aldi. I'm a 1 person household and i do most of my groceries at the Lidl for around €25 per week. And that is including all the crap i usually buy ;D

One question out of interest. What is the cause of those high prices in Lima? This seems a bit out of contrast compared to the average wage of the peruvian.
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby mrsteak » Fri Jan 19, 2018 8:05 pm

DutchPat wrote:
    *Food €6-12 euro daily for 1 person (doing groceries and making my own lunch, eating somewhere is more expensive of course)
    *Public transport with buses, trams and metro's €0,90 base fare and €0,14 for each kilometre
    *Fuel is currently on €1,53 per litre for unleaded 95
    * Gas is €0,63 per cubic metre
    * Electricity is €0,20 per kWh
    * Water €1,10 for 300 cubic metre
    * Cellphone subscription €25 for unlimited calling/data
    * Internet ranges from €20 to €50 for fast speeds
    * Rents typically for my income between €500-800.
    * Health care insurance €92 for cheapest insurance company (basic med care)
    * Studies €1155 a year (intermediate vocational education) €1950 a year (higher vocational education) €2006 a year (university) Please keep in mind that these prices are for Dutch residents and the government pays the most of the education.
    * Movies around €12 for a ticket
    * Taxes depends but minimum required is a health care insurance and liability insurance (€3-5 a month)


I can only quote you what you will have to spend in Lima if you want a life style acceptable to an European (you can use google maps and street view to look at the "cheaper" districts of Lima and you see if you feel comfortable there or not. Just make your own conclusions!).

You can eat a meal for about 10-15 soles, if you live in Miraflores and do not know the places it will be more.
Pulic transport will cost you about 1-1.5s per trip.
1 gallon of gasoline is about 13 soles
electricity will cost you around 0.45-0.50s / kwh
your water bill will be around 50s / month
Internet for 8 mbps will cost you around 100s
a small 1 bedroom apartment in Miraflores will cost you around 600 USD (rents will be likely in USD), or more.
Health insurance will cost you around 200s/month
If you study here in a good university you may spend up to 20.000 USD per year. An average one will cost you around 3000-4000 USD per year.
Grocery / supermarkets will usually cost you far more than in EU (about 2x), coz many things are imported and you pay lot of taxes in it - except local food like potatos, carrots, etc etc (but you can eat 3x per day right? the amount you spend on that is limited).

I do not see how this is really cheaper than your EU location... put this into relation with your possible salary in Lima of about 700 USD... you see my point?
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby mrsteak » Fri Jan 19, 2018 8:10 pm

DutchPat wrote:One question out of interest. What is the cause of those high prices in Lima? This seems a bit out of contrast compared to the average wage of the peruvian.


The cause is that nothing really of value is manufactured in Lima. So many things have to be imported to Peru and then there are lots of $$$duties on it. You can buy a nice shampoo in lets say spanish grocery store for 2.99€. The same shampoo from L'oreal will cost you in lima like 30 soles = 9€ due to the duties paid and the shop also wants to make some money!
Another reason is that there is virtually no control of rental market so land lords ask you prices out of the blue. You will also be paying gringo prices for a time in Lima. Everybody will try to rip you off in Peru that's the reality. Even banks.
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby DutchPat » Fri Jan 19, 2018 8:15 pm

mrsteak wrote:
DutchPat wrote:
    *Food €6-12 euro daily for 1 person (doing groceries and making my own lunch, eating somewhere is more expensive of course)
    *Public transport with buses, trams and metro's €0,90 base fare and €0,14 for each kilometre
    *Fuel is currently on €1,53 per litre for unleaded 95
    * Gas is €0,63 per cubic metre
    * Electricity is €0,20 per kWh
    * Water €1,10 for 300 cubic metre
    * Cellphone subscription €25 for unlimited calling/data
    * Internet ranges from €20 to €50 for fast speeds
    * Rents typically for my income between €500-800.
    * Health care insurance €92 for cheapest insurance company (basic med care)
    * Studies €1155 a year (intermediate vocational education) €1950 a year (higher vocational education) €2006 a year (university) Please keep in mind that these prices are for Dutch residents and the government pays the most of the education.
    * Movies around €12 for a ticket
    * Taxes depends but minimum required is a health care insurance and liability insurance (€3-5 a month)


I can only quote you what you will have to spend in Lima if you want a life style acceptable to an European (you can use google maps and street view to look at the "cheaper" districts of Lima and you see if you feel comfortable there or not. Just make your own conclusions!).

You can eat a meal for about 10-15 soles, if you live in Miraflores and do not know the places it will be more.
Pulic transport will cost you about 1-1.5s per trip.
1 gallon of gasoline is about 13 soles
electricity will cost you around 0.45-0.50s / kwh
your water bill will be around 50s / month
Internet for 8 mbps will cost you around 100s
a small 1 bedroom apartment in Miraflores will cost you around 600 USD (rents will be likely in USD), or more.
Health insurance will cost you around 200s/month
If you study here in a good university you may spend up to 20.000 USD per year. An average one will cost you around 3000-4000 USD per year.
Grocery / supermarkets will usually cost you far more than in EU (about 2x), coz many things are imported and you pay lot of taxes in it - except local food like potatos, carrots, etc etc (but you can eat 3x per day right? the amount you spend on that is limited).

I do not see how this is really cheaper than your EU location... put this into relation with your possible salary in Lima of about 700 USD... you see my point?

Thanks for the clarification. I have read quite a few topics on this forum and i noticed that you have a very outspoken opinion regarding living in Peru. Although this might come across as annoying to some people, i think forums are a great way to discuss about topics, both the positive and negative aspect of things. These kind of discussions are truly valuable for readers like me. One question though, why are you still in Peru?
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby gerard » Fri Jan 19, 2018 8:18 pm

This is actually something which have crossed my mind but having read about the rather slow internet speed i thought this was not really a viable option.


Not sure what you call slow but I have 45mb/s and know 60mb/s is available in a lot of Lima. I've been teleworking here for 9 years with no real issues.
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby DutchPat » Fri Jan 19, 2018 8:22 pm

gerard wrote:
This is actually something which have crossed my mind but having read about the rather slow internet speed i thought this was not really a viable option.


Not sure what you call slow but I have 45mb/s and know 60mb/s is available in a lot of Lima. I've been teleworking here for 9 years with no real issues.

That would be enough for teleworking indeed. What would be the monthly price of such connection?
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby gerard » Fri Jan 19, 2018 8:47 pm

http://www.movistar.com.pe/planes-internet

Depends on exactly what you want - they generally sell a package of TV, landline and Internet. A trio package seems to be about S/.200 for 40Mbps.
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby SilverbackPeru » Fri Jan 19, 2018 9:38 pm

DutchPat wrote:
SilverbackPeru wrote:
windsportinperu wrote:Cost of living in Netherlands same as Peru ?

Some questions to the OP :

What city you are living now ?

Could you provide some data about the cost of living in Netherlands ? food (daily meals, fruits, vegetables, etc), transport (taxis and buses), fuel, gas, electricity, tap water, cellphone, internet, rents, clothing, medicine, health care, studies, movies, taxes!, etc. This way we could check if the cost is the same in Lima (or any other city in Peru) vs the cost of living in Netherlands..


I'd say that costs for many things in Lima will be almost the same price as the Netherlands if it's anything like the U.K. It will be cheaper in the poorer parts of Lima but do you want to live there? Also you have to compare income against expenses and how much disposible cash you are left with.

Just as an example of where I'm at....
Two bedroom apartment £350 - £400 per month.

Three bedroom £475 - £550

Utilities, electric and water £10 a week each using smart meters

Mobile: £22 per month for 40gig internet and unlimited calls and texts.

Council tax £120 a month

Restaurant meal £15 - £25 (£10 is easy to find)

Groceries for the day - maybe £10 tops

Quick meals for dinner breaks at work - you won't really pay more than £5

Tank of fuel £50 - £60

Car Insurance - business rate £44 a month

Healthcare - free

Education - free

University - you only pay your univerdity fees back if you make over £32'000 a year. Free in Scotland.

Medicine - not usually more than £5 or £10. Free or almost if you are unemployed.

Wage for me is between £530 - £650 a week. (Wages in Lima maybe $700).

I know it sounds like Mr Steak is bull $h!tting but you do have to take into account that we aren't getting @r$e f***ed by capitalism as much as our fellow expats from North America, so saying things are probably cheaper in Holland could well be a real possibility.

It indeed looks like the daily expenses are pretty much on par. I'm guessing a rent of a three bedroom apartment for £475 - £550 would be in one of the nicer neighboorshoods in Lima or am i wrong?

Looking at your summary i would say living on a wage as an English teacher would be hard to come by. Exploring the possibility to work like 16 hours a week for my current employer would put me around €1100 a month.


A nice two or three bedroom apartment in one of the better areas is going to cost you around $600 to $1300 a month. You could get something a bit rough around the edges for a cheaper price which is perfectly fine for your stay.
Another option is to just rent a room, that will set you back around $200 - $450 in a good apartment.

The best neighbourhoods are Miraflores, San Isidro and Barranco. You should aim to base yourself in Miraflores or close to Miraflores but it's all about being able to afford to do that. Barranco will be cheaper and it has more nightlife. Barranco is very charming but just be careful late on at night to which areas you go.

You can look at cheaper suburbs but it will feel like you are further away from where all the attractions are. You should also take into account traffic times as traffic in Lima is a nightmare. If ypu teach English traffic will play a big part in your every day life.

It tends to be expensive because it's two worlds in Peru. There's people making a killing on the natural resources side who can afford these sky high prices and then it swings the opposite way to the average household income of $600 -$700 average monthly income per household.

If you can get that deal which will bring you in $1100 a month you'll do fine here and you could have an extremely good experience during your stay in Lima. I would definitely give it a go if that was the case, it'll be a unique adventure for you!!
You'd be able to go on plenty of cheap weekend breaks to see Peru's rich history and culture. The Andes are truely amazing and bus fairs are very cheap.

Supermarkets are expensive but you can just go to the markets for cheap food supplies although it's not as nice it'll save you a good few dollars.

Just plan your trip will, make sure your spanish is better and that you have a good job lined up.
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby windsportinperu » Fri Jan 19, 2018 9:43 pm

DutchPat, It is very interesting to compare the cost of living in Rotterdam vs Lima.

I have chosen the cost of living of a group of traditional middle class district in Lima (San Miguel, Magdalena, Jesus Maria, Lince, Pueblo Libre.. ). They all are located in a very central part of Lima with nice parks, some of them are near the ocean, nice people, nice houses, easy access to all kind of transportation, etc.

Daily food: S/. 9 soles = € 2.28 … about ¼ of average € 9
Public Transport = S/. 1 to S/. 1.5 (depending on the distance) = € 0.25 .. about 1/3 to ¼ of € 0.9
Taxis = S/. 3 to 4 for a 10-15 block ride, S/. 6 to 7 for a 20 block ride .
95 octanes Gasoline = +- S/. 13 soles / gallon . As 3.85 liter / gallon = S/. 3.37 /lt = € 0.85 vs € 1.53 in Europe
Electricity = S/. 0.5 kwh = € 0.12 vs € 2 in Europe
Cellphone = similar prices
Internet 20mbps = S/. 100 = € 25
Healthcare = depends on who you are. Free for the poor people
Studies = Free for public universities
Grocery = everything is produced here: milk, meat, fresh fish, fruits, all kind of vegetables, coffee, beer, candies, etc. Only is imported “fancy” food . You can buy cheaper prices than Wong (about half the price) in a “Mercado”
Rents: about 70% to 80% compared to Rotterdam

I do not want to arrive to conclusions, but Living in Lima is way more cheaper than Rotterdam
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby mrsteak » Fri Jan 19, 2018 9:55 pm

windsportinperu wrote:I do not want to arrive to conclusions, but Living in Lima is way more cheaper than Rotterdam


It is, only if you live in the suspicious and dangerous parts of Lima. It is more expensive in Lima, if you target a "similar" (does not mean equal) quality of life as e.g. Rotterdam.

I've randomly dropped the mark on google street view in Pueblo Libre, that was proposed:

https://www.google.de/maps/place/Lima,+Peru/@-12.0777982,-77.0587761,3a,66.8y,90t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1sUFgbNbw53Gi4T94nDeiHcw!2e0!4m2!3m1!1s0x9105c5f619ee3ec7:0x14206cb9cc452e4a

You can explore it on the map and see if this is a neighborhood that at all comes close to your standard of life in Rotterdam.

Also take into account your daily food makes really a small fraction of your cost of living. Lot of things in Lima are far more expensive than lets say Rotterdam. You will find used cars e.g.: in very bad condition and very expensive. Yeah you buy it maybe once every 5 years but believe me all these things sum up! Moreover you will find lot of products sold in Peru to be not nearly of the quality as sold in Europe. Far more expensive and oldish.
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby Slippin' Jimmy » Fri Jan 19, 2018 10:02 pm

Be proactive.
Start going into super survival mode right now. Save as much as possible to stockpile an emergency cash reserve.

A few months before your move, have a fire sale i.e. sell any and everything of value.

When in Peru, don't live in the expensive barrios in Lima.
Try to get your girlfriend to find you an affordable place.
Let her do the negotiating.
A gringo will always pay more for anything.
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby windsportinperu » Fri Jan 19, 2018 10:05 pm

DutchPat wrote: I've read about Movistar and the fact the providers only have to guarantee 10% of the advertised speed.


Good to know you mention this. Someone here in expatperu manipulated this 10% as it were an every day fact.

It is true that by law they guarantee 10%, but it does not mean that the Internet provider is going to offer you 10% all the time. I have a very stable connection here in Lima. From my experience it fails about 3 times per year. The real problem is "re installation" is slow. From my experience during the last years it takes 8 to 24 hours. It happens more frequently during the rainy days here

The truth is that traffic in Lima is chaotic, but it is compensated by good quality food and everything is cheaper.

Rents seen to be expensive in Lima. If you have the opportunity to live in the house of the parents of your girlfriend, do not take it as bad. Here in Peru it is very common.
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby SilverbackPeru » Fri Jan 19, 2018 10:16 pm

windsportinperu wrote:DutchPat, It is very interesting to compare the cost of living in Rotterdam vs Lima.

I have chosen the cost of living of a group of traditional middle class district in Lima (San Miguel, Magdalena, Jesus Maria, Lince, Pueblo Libre.. ). They all are located in a very central part of Lima with nice parks, some of them are near the ocean, nice people, nice houses, easy access to all kind of transportation, etc.

Daily food: S/. 9 soles = € 2.28 … about ¼ of average € 9
Public Transport = S/. 1 to S/. 1.5 (depending on the distance) = € 0.25 .. about 1/3 to ¼ of € 0.9
Taxis = S/. 3 to 4 for a 10-15 block ride, S/. 6 to 7 for a 20 block ride .
95 octanes Gasoline = +- S/. 13 soles / gallon . As 3.85 liter / gallon = S/. 3.37 /lt = € 0.85 vs € 1.53 in Europe
Electricity = S/. 0.5 kwh = € 0.12 vs € 2 in Europe
Cellphone = similar prices
Internet 20mbps = S/. 100 = € 25
Healthcare = depends on who you are. Free for the poor people
Studies = Free for public universities
Grocery = everything is produced here: milk, meat, fresh fish, fruits, all kind of vegetables, coffee, beer, candies, etc. Only is imported “fancy” food . You can buy cheaper prices than Wong (about half the price) in a “Mercado”
Rents: about 70% to 80% compared to Rotterdam

I do not want to arrive to conclusions, but Living in Lima is way more cheaper than Rotterdam


You forgot to add wages. That's where all the comparing comes crashing down.

Plus there is no way in hell I'd trust the Peruvian national health service if i was sick, it's extremely poor. Also the national education system was ranked as one of the worst in the world a few years ago.

You also have to take into account the quality of the cheaper food. The cheap food is one of the worst things about living in Peru I always thought. Those La Menu meals for S/.6 are awful and have no nutritional value.

When I left Lima a year ago the minimum starting price was five soles, a taxi wouldn't take you anywhere for less. It was four blocks from the supermarket to my house and that was six soles cheapest. The casa de hogar furniture store to Miraflores was S/.15 and that's just across the expressa.

Also Jesus Maria, Magdalena, San Miguel, Lince aren't all that nice neighbourhoods. Sure they have a couple of nice parts and there has been a lot of redevelopement, Pueblo Libre has some nice historical locations but most of those areas have the typical Peru building site look that make a European council estate look like The Hilton.
If someone was coming to Peru I wouldn't recommend them to stay in those places, they're kinda dumps and are way lower quality of life to almost everywhere in Rotterdam i would say. It's not an equal comparrison by any means.
Last edited by SilverbackPeru on Fri Jan 19, 2018 10:34 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby windsportinperu » Fri Jan 19, 2018 10:18 pm

mrsteak wrote: Moreover you will find lot of products sold in Peru to be not nearly of the quality as sold in Europe. Far more expensive and oldish.


examples ?
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby mrsteak » Fri Jan 19, 2018 10:19 pm

windsportinperu wrote:Rents seen to be expensive in Lima. If you have the opportunity to live in the house of the parents of your girlfriend, do not take it as bad. Here in Peru it is very common.


unless he has bad luck and his GF is from SJL or La Victoria....
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby mrsteak » Fri Jan 19, 2018 10:28 pm

windsportinperu wrote:
mrsteak wrote: Moreover you will find lot of products sold in Peru to be not nearly of the quality as sold in Europe. Far more expensive and oldish.


examples ?


Mostly *everything*. Lots of products are fakes from China. One example: I had to buy a router and got a TpLink model however it was resetting itself very frequently. I finally opened it and realized that the PCB is a fake, it does not match the PCB of same tplink model sold in EU - it was missing shielding around the RF unit and also the power supply was far cheaper - all due to the fact that there are NO laws/normatives in Peru, OR if there are any they are not enforced by authorites. Result: lot of crap products enter Peru, stuff that won't be allowed in US/EU. Frequently there also toxic substances in the stuff imported from China. As Peru do not enforce lot of control they ship these products that do not pass western world standards to third world countries. Believe it or not. Take a sample of plastic sold in Peru and send it to a lab in US and you will see.

Another example: vacuum cleaners. Models sold in Peru are forbidden in EU due to energy efficiency / noise etc. However even european companies happily export their garbage products otherwise not sell-able in EU to countries like Peru. Authorities just do nothing in Peru.

Another example: CCFL bulbs. contain far too much mercury, are forbidden in EU and US with these mercury content.

Another example: paints. Sold in Peru containing prohibited and cancerogenic substances, lot of time ago forbidden in the EU/US.

The list is really endless. Even some clothes sold in Gamarra will contain toxic paints. Just open your eyes and do not believe anything. Even your so tasty food in Peru is not so tasty if you know what is inside.
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby mrsteak » Fri Jan 19, 2018 10:38 pm

windsportinperu wrote:Magdalena in videos:

the only nice "thing" there seems to be the hot chica :mrgreen:
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby windsportinperu » Fri Jan 19, 2018 10:42 pm

mrsteak wrote: the only nice "thing" there seems to be the hot chica :mrgreen:


I know that girl :D
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby SilverbackPeru » Fri Jan 19, 2018 10:49 pm



Yep I've got an in law that lives a few blocks from the church with the giant dome.
There is some nice blocks in each of those neighbourhoods and like all parts of the city on the cliff tops they will create nice parks and put modern apartments but sorry the videos have only reinforced my view that most of those districts are eye sores.
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby mrsteak » Fri Jan 19, 2018 10:50 pm

SilverbackPeru wrote:You forgot to add wages. That's where all the comparing comes crashing down.


yeah exactly... let lima be 80% of Rotterdam cost of living but with 1/5 of the average Rotterdam wage... now the $1.000.000 question: what is the better location for living?

Plus there is no way in hell I'd trust the Peruvian national health service if i was sick, it's extremely poor. Also the national education system was ranked as one of the worst in the world a few years ago.


Not even these expensive hospitals can be trusted. When I did an analysis in Good Hope they told me they found parasites however I just drunk too much milk day before and they misinterpreted milk fat as parasite eggs...
I was curious and also went to the Surco Municipal hospital to check my eyes. It was only 15/s however the glass prescription was totally wrong and deviated significantly from my present glasses. I double checked it when I was back in Spain and values I got were identical with previous values.

You also have to take into account the quality of the cheaper food. The cheap food is one of the worst things about living in Peru I always thought. Those La Menu meals for S/.6 are awful and have no nutritional value.


I would rather eat wood chips with motor oil than these s/6 menus.

Also Jesus Maria, Magdalena, San Miguel, Lince aren't all that nice neighbourhoods. Sure they have a couple of nice parts and there has been a lot of redevelopement, Pueblo Libre has some nice historical locations but most of those areas have the typical Peru building site look that make a European council estate look like The Hilton.

he he... yeah!!! You can find such crappy real estate also in Spain. If you go to the country interior the small pueblos will usually have a crappy look, wall paint falling off, rusty doors and so on, however hey you are in Spain. You just drive 10 minutes and have modern and nice infrastructure again. Compared to Peru I find the spanish crappy pueblos even stylish :mrgreen: And yeah a casa in such country side pueblo in Spain would cost you between 20.000 and 30.000€. This is still around 1/4 to 1/3 of a crappy place in Peru. So whats the point...
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby mrsteak » Fri Jan 19, 2018 10:57 pm

what I mean with crappy look is e.g.:

https://www.google.de/maps/place/Tarragona,+Provinz+Tarragona,+Spanien/@41.1180639,1.2563289,3a,66.8y,90.24t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1sCAoSLEFGMVFpcE85RlZFaWJZOUU0Q3pJaWVQbERhZ3hlbjVtb0pvckdkQXliSEVT!2e0!4m2!3m1!1s0x12a3fcdbd3ddf159:0x920569a71387a3b2

however you will find that you love those places once you are in Spain, coz they give you the antique feeling however surrounded by modern and quality infrastructure. In Peru you just cannot escape the crap.
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby windsportinperu » Fri Jan 19, 2018 11:02 pm

Wages depends on who you are..

I do not want to mention how much money I got per month, but it is over the average of any European country.

In Peru depends on your capacity to make money and work hard.

In US and Europe almost everything is done, there is no niche markets. while in Peru there is a lot of thing to do, a lot of niches markets.. You just need some money (brought from Europe, I guess) to begin a good business here.
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby mrsteak » Fri Jan 19, 2018 11:06 pm

windsportinperu wrote:In US and Europe almost everything is done, there is no niche markets. while in Peru there is a lot of thing to do, a lot of niches markets.. You just need some money (brought from Europe, I guess) to begin a good business here.


Thats absolutely not true. Innovation happens in countries like US/EU/Asia/Japan as of now. Peru is 50 years behind and can hardly make a wood screw on itself. I do not consider good business bringing pre-existing stuff to retards. It may be good money yeah but a good business means innovation.
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby windsportinperu » Fri Jan 19, 2018 11:10 pm

mrsteak wrote:
Another example: CCFL bulbs. contain far too much mercury, are forbidden in EU and US with these mercury content.

Another example: paints. Sold in Peru containing prohibited and cancerogenic substances, lot of time ago forbidden in the EU/US.

The list is really endless. Even some clothes sold in Gamarra will contain toxic paints. Just open your eyes and do not believe anything. Even your so tasty food in Peru is not so tasty if you know what is inside.


If what you say were true , I would have cancer and all my family and friends with the same sickness ... Over exaggeration again

All the food I eat daily is fresh and produced here. non-GMO, organic or semi-organic . And the quality of food and water is even better if you go to provinces
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby windsportinperu » Fri Jan 19, 2018 11:14 pm

mrsteak wrote: Thats absolutely not true. Innovation happens in countries like US/EU/Asia/Japan as of now. Peru is 50 years behind and can hardly make a wood screw on itself. I do not consider good business bringing pre-existing stuff to retards. It may be good money yeah but a good business means innovation.


False. You have no idea how to make business here.

The innovation market is usually for the big companies and the "last minute" technology

I mean having your own business (micro or mini enterprise) here where there is a lot of niche markets.
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby mrsteak » Fri Jan 19, 2018 11:19 pm

windsportinperu wrote:False. You have no idea how to make business here.

The innovation market is usually for the big companies and the "last minute" technology

I mean having your own business (micro or mini enterprise) here where there is a lot of niche markets.


LOL. The business that you mean works the same around the globe: sell expensive what you bought / got cheap. However there is one problem with Peru: Peruvians do not want quality products. There is no awareness about quality of life and so no demand for quality products - except maybe food.
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby windsportinperu » Fri Jan 19, 2018 11:26 pm

mrsteak wrote: LOL.


if you do not understand what I mean with niche market in Peru, the only thing for you is to laugh-out-loud

:D
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby gerard » Fri Jan 19, 2018 11:31 pm

I'm currently on a special from Movistar of 120Mbps and Ookla reports 8ms ping, 120Mbps download and 11.8Mbps upload. I'm online pretty much all day and very rarely have disruption - my office in the UK has far more issues with the Internet service than I do. My download speed is actually double what my office gets in the UK, and it took them months to get anything better than 20Mbps even though they are based in a major UK city.

For sure Movistar have terrible customer service, but once you actually manage to get the kit installed then it generally works pretty well.

I don't know of any ISP that guarantees full bandwidth at domestic prices. They all run contention ratios of around 10:1.

If the OP wants to live like a tourist for a few months then sure, look at Miraflores and Barranco and pay for the experience. But Lima is so much more than that. If he (or she) is really thinking to come here to be with a girl then talk to her about what is available close to where she lives and live like the other 90% of Lima, who seem to manage perfectly well despite not living in the trendiest parts of the city. I'm sure Rotterdam isn't all picture postcard houses, and like all cities has good parts and bad parts.
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby SilverbackPeru » Fri Jan 19, 2018 11:36 pm

windsportinperu wrote:Wages depends on who you are..

I do not want to mention how much money I got per month, but it is over the average of any European country.

In Peru depends on your capacity to make money and work hard.

In US and Europe almost everything is done, there is no niche markets. while in Peru there is a lot of thing to do, a lot of niches markets.. You just need some money (brought from Europe, I guess) to begin a good business here.


I don't think it's about working hard as most Peruvians work hard, long hours and still make nothing. It's more about having the right skills for Peru's growing economy and as you say filling those sections where there is a gap.
When you say wages depend on who you are this is true but 90% of people in Peru don't have the skills to make that money and I would be careful of giving someone thinking about moving to Peru who might not have those desired skills (although skilled you have to be skilled in the right field to succeed) a rosie picture of Peru.

When comparing quality of life to each country I would say those videos of so called middle class neighbourhoods sums up the whole difference between the two continents. The usually middle class in Peru have a lot lower quality of life than most working class in Europe i would say. You can tell the poor quality of buildings in those videos you posted as well which is another thing that sums up the difference in places.

Again I don't think those suburbs are overly great and the cost of living maybe cheaper but I have zero skills and make around $35 to 40'000 a year delivering take away food. I can't see how Peru would give me those opportunities.
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby mrsteak » Fri Jan 19, 2018 11:40 pm

windsportinperu wrote:
mrsteak wrote: LOL.


if you do not understand what I mean with niche market in Peru, the only thing for you is to laugh-out-loud

:D


It is not any skill to sell water in the desert, if you understand what I mean. But it is a skill to sell water in front of a free to public natural water source. :mrgreen: I suppose your business will not work in a normal country, that's why you came to Peru....
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby SilverbackPeru » Fri Jan 19, 2018 11:44 pm

In regards to the quality of products I strongly disagree with this theory that Peruvians don't want quality goods.

You just have to take into account that the wealth is very divided here. That well off part of Peruvian society wants good quality products and are more than willing to pay for it. You just have to remember a lot of people don't have the same disposible cash. Yes there is a hell of a lot of cheap chinese crap in Peru, but you just need to walk around Jockey Plaza to see all the highend stuff.

Also you get very good medical care for the price of the insurance you get here. Good Hope is only an average clinic, it's nowhere near being one of the best.
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby mrsteak » Fri Jan 19, 2018 11:52 pm

SilverbackPeru wrote:When comparing quality of life to each country I would say those videos of so called middle class neighbourhoods sums up the whole difference between the two continents. The usually middle class in Peru have a lot lower quality of life than most working class in Europe i would say. You can tell the poor quality of buildings in those videos you posted as well which is another thing that sums up the difference in places.


The problem starts already at the root... you do not have affordable & quality building materials in Peru to build better looking / better quality buildings. You will hardly find a door that fulfills e.g. any european noise isolation norm. Same for windows. Did you ever see how lets say a dutch window is looking like? Means in your super expensive crap peruvian apartment you will have permanent noise when your neighbour is watching TV with his toddler. You will be waken up at night due to noise. You won't be able to concentrate doing e.g. an office job next day. Same if you e.g. want to buy tools in Peru. They are of very poor quality. Try for example to buy a laptop with IPS screen in Peru - it is for me inevitable to do my work. You will find none or maybe at a 3x the price of US. You basically lack any base in this country to delivery any type of quality work, except maybe cooking food.

Try to import e.g. some industrial machinery to Peru. Maybe a latest generation edge cutting laser 3D printer and start a business. Maybe you will get some clients but then... one day you need a replacement part. It won't be available in Peru. You will have to order it from EU or US and wait 6 weeks for delivery and then fight months with the customs or pay them bribes to clear your goods. That's the reality. It is just a very bad place to do any business except you do not need any imported goods and you are willing to permanently bribe the authorities. That's the peruvian reality. Anyone who claims the opposite is just telling you lies.
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby mrsteak » Sat Jan 20, 2018 12:00 am

SilverbackPeru wrote:In regards to the quality of products I strongly disagree with this theory that Peruvians don't want quality goods.

You just have to take into account that the wealth is very divided here. That well off part of Peruvian society wants good quality products and are more than willing to pay for it. You just have to remember a lot of people don't have the same disposible cash. Yes there is a hell of a lot of cheap chinese crap in Peru, but you just need to walk around Jockey Plaza to see all the highend stuff.

Also you get very good medical care for the price of the insurance you get here. Good Hope is only an average clinic, it's nowhere near being one of the best.


You also find lot of fakes even in Jockey Plaza. Half of Pierre Cardin clothes there are fakes believe me. I was living in France for long time and I know how real PC looks and feels like. Just one example.

And yeah Good Hope is nothing special. Far below an average private clinic in Spain. But what does that tell me? A clinic in a central place in one of the best districts of Lima just being far below average health care in EU - is it that?

Anyway the thread again drifted to far away from the original question. And the question was: a 27 old man without work experience wants to come to Peru and survive with Peruvian salary. I say: BAD idea.
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby windsportinperu » Sat Jan 20, 2018 12:03 am

mrsteak wrote: Try to import e.g. some industrial machinery to Peru. Maybe a latest generation edge cutting laser 3D printer and start a business. Maybe you will get some clients but then... one day you need a replacement part. It won't be available in Peru. You will have to order it from EU or US and wait 6 weeks for delivery and then fight months ...


Good example of someone who has no idea how to make a business in Peru. A very pessimistic and negative visualization of his own business !

Why to buy a last tech machinery if you do not have the right amount of clients ?

Why not to import the machine + the right spare parts to maintain the business alive ?

MrSteak, I have learned to deal with you "writing" style and tolerate your exaggeration. Take it as a compliment ! :D

Good night..
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby mrsteak » Sat Jan 20, 2018 12:08 am

windsportinperu wrote:
mrsteak wrote: Try to import e.g. some industrial machinery to Peru. Maybe a latest generation edge cutting laser 3D printer and start a business. Maybe you will get some clients but then... one day you need a replacement part. It won't be available in Peru. You will have to order it from EU or US and wait 6 weeks for delivery and then fight months ...


Good example of someone who has no idea how to make a business in Peru. A very pessimistic and negative visualization of his own business !

Why to buy a last tech machinery if you do not have the right amount of clients ?

Why not to import the machine + the right spare parts to maintain the business alive ?

MrSteak, I have learned to deal with you "writing" style and tolerate your exaggeration. Take it as a compliment ! :D

Good night..


windsportinperu: you still not getting the point :mrgreen: I want to be on the top of the development and not heroically fight problems otherwise unknown in any other place. Doing business in Peru is closer to feel like being in North Korea than in eg US or EU.
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby SilverbackPeru » Sat Jan 20, 2018 12:16 am

The threads gone off topic and I guess I could be part of that but to the OP you should check out urbania.pe. It's a housing webpage for Peru. Aquiler means rent.
Just have a flick through and this will help you get an idea of rental prices. You can also go through the rental page on this sites forum for an idea of how much rents will be. Livinginperu.com is another good site to check as it has a classified page with rentals and jobs.
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Re: Options for a bachelor graduate in Lima

Postby mrsteak » Sat Jan 20, 2018 12:18 am

SilverbackPeru wrote:In regards to the quality of products I strongly disagree with this theory that Peruvians don't want quality goods.


Everybody wants quality goods but not everybody is willing to pay for it, got it? I remember the discussion with previous land lord about better windows. I even offered her to pay half of the price but she only argued "for what I need it". Well, the problem is that an average peruvian just has no freaking idea about quality of life. Sleeping all his life on a bad, moldy matress and now explain him why he should get a memory foam matress and regulated box spring for $1999 - he won't buy it believe me. People in Peru are just used to cope with quality of everything being bad. That's how they grow up and it will not change - NEVER. Not in my life and not in this century. To make Lima a livable place you would need to raze 95% of it with a bulldozer and start from scratch. You will never have a livable city where all houses are built wall-to-wall, it is as simple as that. In Lima just more crap is added ontop of crap, that's what it is :mrgreen:

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