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FYI--if you ever plan on leaving Peru indefinitely...

Posted: Wed Aug 13, 2008 8:26 pm
by sydkym
I just went through the process of cancelling my residency. Here´s what I had to do...

1) Take the following to the immigration building in Breña no more than 10 days before your departure:
- a copy of formulario 007
- a carta de garantia from my spouse (Peruvian), notarized
- a carta de viaje from myself stating that I´m leaving Peru
- a copy of my passport
- a copy of my carné de extranjeria
- a copy of my departure ticket

2) Pay 21 soles at the banco there

3) Take all the forms to the "mesa de partes" on the first floor (right by the entrance) They will give you a ticket and tell you to return in 2 days.

4) 2 days later, go to the last window on the 3rd floor with your ticket, passport, and carné. They will take your carné (make sure you´ve paid all your taxes and have all your stickers on the back) and then ask you to wait about 20 minutes. They will print out some documents, stamp your passport, sign it, and finally give you your passport and a green slip for exiting the country. They keep your carné.

I hope my experience can help others in the future.

Posted: Wed Aug 13, 2008 8:30 pm
by David
What would happen if you just left? Maybe naive but it is something I would be inclined to do.

Would you be forbidden to return?

Posted: Thu Aug 14, 2008 9:23 am
by sydkym
That´s what I thought too, but I´m not risking this one.

Posted: Thu Aug 14, 2008 1:33 pm
by naturegirl
I don't think that there would be a prob if you left and entered as a tourist. BUt if you wanted residency again, you' might have some problems.

Posted: Thu Aug 14, 2008 5:51 pm
by craig
naturegirl wrote:I don't think that there would be a prob if you left and entered as a tourist. BUt if you wanted residency again, you' might have some problems.


I don't understand. If you just left and then came back wouldn't you already have residency?

I don't understand the point of formally giving up residency. What is the point?

Posted: Thu Aug 14, 2008 8:21 pm
by sydkym
The point is following by Peru´s rules. They seem to pride themselves on making the foreigners (or citizens) jump through hoops. I´ve been living here for a year and I didn´t want any problems when I get to the airport. This way seemed to be "easy" and following their rules.

Posted: Thu Aug 14, 2008 8:39 pm
by craig
sydkym wrote:The point is following by Peru´s rules. They seem to pride themselves on making the foreigners (or citizens) jump through hoops. I´ve been living here for a year and I didn´t want any problems when I get to the airport. This way seemed to be "easy" and following their rules.


OK, but what are the rules? Is there some rule that says a person with residency can't leave the country without renouncing residency? Surely not!

Annoyed and confused also

Posted: Thu Aug 14, 2008 9:40 pm
by excaliguy
Peru really does a disservice to itself with it's confusing and harrassing laws toward foreigners. I am always confused at the airport with what documents they want when I exit and enter the country and always afraid they will delay me and I will miss a flight. My last time leaving the immigration guy asked me if I had my SUNAT form. I had never been asked for that before, and I just shrugged no and have no idea what he was talking about. He let me through, but now I just dread going in and out of Peru. I need to leave often for family reasons and it just makes the tension that much higher.

How about this Peru: I am a legal resident. Stamp my passport when I leave and stamp it when I enter. No further questions. Is that so hard.

Posted: Fri Aug 15, 2008 9:24 am
by naturegirl
Craig wrote:
naturegirl wrote:I don't think that there would be a prob if you left and entered as a tourist. BUt if you wanted residency again, you' might have some problems.


I don't understand. If you just left and then came back wouldn't you already have residency?

I don't understand the point of formally giving up residency. What is the point?


WEll, technically, probably you might, depending on if the card was valid or not. Plus it's valid for five years, techinically, BUT you have to renew it every year, So I really don't get it.

Posted: Fri Aug 15, 2008 12:28 pm
by tomsax
Oh dear, I just left a year ago and my residency expired. I'm hoping to return as a tourist in September. I'll let you know if I have any problems or otherwise.

Re: Annoyed and confused also

Posted: Fri Aug 15, 2008 1:07 pm
by rgamarra
excaliguy wrote:Peru really does a disservice to itself with it's confusing and harrassing laws toward foreigners. I am always confused at the airport with what documents they want when I exit and enter the country and always afraid they will delay me and I will miss a flight. My last time leaving the immigration guy asked me if I had my SUNAT form. I had never been asked for that before, and I just shrugged no and have no idea what he was talking about. He let me through, but now I just dread going in and out of Peru. I need to leave often for family reasons and it just makes the tension that much higher.

How about this Peru: I am a legal resident. Stamp my passport when I leave and stamp it when I enter. No further questions. Is that so hard.


They always give me [email protected] about my TAM card. One says I need it, the other takes it and another says I don't. The problem is they do not know the rules and are just as confused as we are.

The best thing is enter/leave over-prepared rather than under-prepared and you should have no problems.

I usually apologize if I don't have what they want, say I didn't know and then thank them for "informing" me.

Unfortunately Peru is very bureaucratic and they enjoy staring at a sheet of paper for 5 minutes only to over analyze it. :roll:

I wish things were more to the point here. (*Wishful thinking!*) :o

Posted: Fri Aug 15, 2008 2:33 pm
by Yuyis
Leaving the country indefinitely, I have also wondered how that would be. But what if you leave - say, for just a family visit - and then later on you decide not to return to Peru for whatever reason.
I guess you could go to the Peruvian consulate in your country and cancel your residence there. What do you think?

Posted: Fri Aug 15, 2008 2:40 pm
by ducado
Actually I went through this.
From 1999 -2000 I was a legal resident, but we decided to go back to my home country. I didn't renounce my residency, and everytime we came as a tourist back to Peru, I just entered as a tourist.
Then in 2006 we decided again to go to live in Peru, so I had to become a legal resident again.
They told me my old residency had expired, and I just had to do the procedure again, like applying for it the first time. I did that, and no problems.
Then when they finally gave me my CE, it had also stamped on it, that it replaces my old resident card.

Posted: Sun Aug 17, 2008 5:40 pm
by curlyguy18
As a Peruvian citizen, I have no idea what y'all go through immigration-wise, but it seems to me like just leaving the country without renouncing to your residency doesnt seem like a bad plan. Like Ducado said, you could re-apply for residency.

Things will be much easier and orderly when I become president. =)

Posted: Sun Aug 17, 2008 5:55 pm
by David
curlyguy18 wrote:Things will be much easier and orderly when I become president. =)


Between you and Rachel I don't know who to vote for!

leaving the country - Peru CE

Posted: Tue Aug 19, 2008 3:26 pm
by tupacperu
I have done both: leave the country indefinitley and left for a visit to the USA. In both cases you have to have permission to leave.

I envy my wife and son, they can go to Brazil without a VISA and leave Peru and enter without paper work (just a green card).

When I discovered that I could not leave Peru without a form from SUNAT and Immigration, I cancelled my carnet and enter and leave now as a tourist. I am in Chiclayo most of the time, so crossing the border is a simple as catching a bus and spending a night in a $20.00 per night hotel.

I do business in the USA and sometimes have to leave in a moments notice. These regulations were hurting my business and ability to leave Peru quickly. Really, I do not see any benefit in a CE other than opening a bank account or getting a mortgage.

The FTA does not work to a small person's advantage, it is menat for large companies. I work over the internet, even though I make a 6 figure salary and my company has an office in Peru. Peru will not accept an employee verification from companies outside of Peru. (I work for the North American division). The HR department is in the USA for myself.

Then there was an issue, where banks wanted to speak to a live person ( I could have gave my friend in the USA virtual telephone number and have him verify me), I thought it was a joke that they wanted to speak to a live person, when all that was needed was to call an 800 number, punch in a temporary code and get a Fax OR a voice verification.

The only issue with leaving Peru and not cancelling your CE. It will cancel automatically after about 6 months outside of Peru. This applies to Green Cards in the USA, if you are out of the country more than 365 days your green cards is cancelled. Peru will allow you to enter, but enter as a tourist and there is not problem. When they look at the 2 stamps in my passport. I just tell them I cancelled my carnet. I have had no problems.

The other option is to stay beyond your 6 month visa renewals and pay the $1.00 per day penalty. It is cheaper than a plane ticket to Miami.

Posted: Thu Nov 20, 2008 5:05 pm
by Splaktar
Has anyone tried to leave after your CE had been expired for a short time? Would they give you a big hassle? Do you have to pay the same $1 per day fee or would they stop you from leaving the country?

Posted: Thu Nov 20, 2008 9:14 pm
by tupacperu
If you over stay it is $1.00 per day for anyone. But with your CE expired you would have to go to immigration to get permission to leave. Jump through the hoops (paperwork). You would have to pay all your debt and taxes and have proof of it from SUNAT.

Re: Annoyed and confused also

Posted: Thu Nov 20, 2008 10:00 pm
by curlyguy18
[quote="excaliguy"]Peru really does a disservice to itself with it's confusing and harrassing laws toward foreigners. quote]

Like the US does a great job in its immigration field????? Talk about the pot calling the kettle black.

Posted: Thu Nov 20, 2008 10:40 pm
by naturegirl
Well said. I couldn't even imagine going through US visa stuff. Here it only takes a couple of months, there it's at laest six, plus the paperwork once you get ther.e

Posted: Fri Nov 21, 2008 1:58 pm
by kristidnyc
I have to second that the immigration is worse in the US. I have been living in the US for ten years legally, with different kinds of student/work visas and now finally a green card. Every time I enter I'm treated with suspicion and asked a million questions. My green card, which took 10 months, was almost denied because we were missing some papers. In 10 months and during the interview no one told us that anything was missing although they looked through everything in front of us. Had it been denied, I would have had to leave the country, wait another 6-10 months, pay another $800... But you live with it and accept it, because it's my choice to live in the US whether I like it or not, and whether or not I like the bureaucracy.

My point is, that you are guests in Peru, and you should follow the rules which seem simple and not too time-consuming, out of respect for the country you've chosen to live in.

Posted: Fri Nov 21, 2008 7:51 pm
by tupacperu
kristidnyc wrote:I have to second that the immigration is worse in the US. I have been living in the US for ten years legally, with different kinds of student/work visas and now finally a green card. Every time I enter I'm treated with suspicion and asked a million questions. My green card, which took 10 months, was almost denied because we were missing some papers. In 10 months and during the interview no one told us that anything was missing although they looked through everything in front of us. Had it been denied, I would have had to leave the country, wait another 6-10 months, pay another $800... But you live with it and accept it, because it's my choice to live in the US whether I like it or not, and whether or not I like the bureaucracy.

My point is, that you are guests in Peru, and you should follow the rules which seem simple and not too time-consuming, out of respect for the country you've chosen to live in.



I fully agree, everytime my wife enters the USA there is always a hassle. One time a customs agent told her to learn english, like spanish was a inferior language, and this was in Ft Lauderdale where there are spanish speaking agents. Then again in NY where they held her up and where laughing an giggling until they decided to allow her to pass.

The sign says that they will treat all with dignity but that is a crock.

The last time we came in immigrations put her name in the computer incorrectly and we spent 3 hours in immigration. They only saving grace was that we enter previously together and we both had the same stamp and date in our passports. entering the USA is a nightmare. I usually get hassled and my baggage searched. I do not mind it comes with the territory (coke in Peru).

But the way they treat foreigners of latino descent irks me.

Personally that is why I love Peru, I can deal with all the negatives in Peru and the things that many say it lacks , but at least in Peru I have my dignity as a human being. So for all the hassle and running around to complete paper work in Peru, I can deal with that. Try to deal with the attitudes of the clerks in the California DMV or Post Office.

People in these postions in Peru (in my 5 years there) are very formal and I like that. Instead of Shaquanda (USA) doing her nails and on her cellphone while you are waiting in line

Posted: Fri Nov 21, 2008 10:18 pm
by curlyguy18
Well, i guess I can understand why the US is a bit more strict when it comes to allowing people to enter American territory. Given all the illegal immigration, it is understandable America is trying to avoid getting more illegals. That doesn't mean foreigners need to be treated disrespectfully, however. It sucks for those who go by the rules, for they will be looked at suspiciously and in many cases they will be given a hard time. Just another example of people being affected by other people's bad actions.

Y'all be glad you don't have to pay 150 USD, go to an intimidating-looking embassy to apply for a visa and most likely get rejected, in oder to enter Peru.

Posted: Sat Nov 22, 2008 10:03 am
by craig
tarollins wrote:Personally that is why I love Peru, I can deal with all the negatives in Peru and the things that many say it lacks , but at least in Peru I have my dignity as a human being. So for all the hassle and running around to complete paper work in Peru, I can deal with that. Try to deal with the attitudes of the clerks in the California DMV or Post Office.


Ditto!

There may be a danger of being cheated or stolen from in Peru (altho that has never happened to me personally) but I will not be treated as a criminal, harassed, arrested or tortured for trying to avoid such abuses. In Peru my person will be respected.

Craig

Posted: Sat Nov 22, 2008 10:27 am
by naturegirl
They don't treat people with respect. I was in LAX a bit ago, they had secrurity set up in the hall way, not enough lights, no signs, shouting at tourists, telling them to put evertying on the conveyer belt, then getting angry when their passports and boarding passes went through the xrays.
Compared to the white gloves and bowing in Japan, immigrations is a joke isn the US.

I know it's becuase of 911, but please, that was 7 years ago, they need to get organised.

Posted: Sat Nov 22, 2008 10:38 am
by craig
naturegirl wrote:I know it's becuase of 911, but please, that was 7 years ago, they need to get organised.


Am I the only one who has noticed that security itself is worse since the government took over airport security in a congressional "lets do something, anything" political charade?

Craig

Posted: Mon Nov 24, 2008 12:10 am
by Splaktar
tarollins wrote:Personally that is why I love Peru, I can deal with all the negatives in Peru and the things that many say it lacks , but at least in Peru I have my dignity as a human being. So for all the hassle and running around to complete paper work in Peru, I can deal with that. Try to deal with the attitudes of the clerks in the California DMV or Post Office.


That's just because you aren't a cholo. If you were you would see that Peru is even more racist and harassing of native Peruvians than the US is of Latinos. Sure you get treated great as a foreigner in Peru, but a lot of natives get treated like dogs just because the color of their skin (and this is in daily life, not just once in a while security related checks).

Posted: Mon Nov 24, 2008 12:19 am
by curlyguy18
I partly agree with you, and I didn't quite like the way you used the word "cholo" in your post. Somehow it came across as derogative, in my opinion. It is true that many people here are prejudicial and racist, but not everyone is like that. Sometimes we discriminate those that are a it less fortunate than us, like the guy that collects the bus fare, or the food vendors, but at the same time, they sometimes try to take advantage of us by overcharging. Neither action (the discriminating and the overcharging) is okay, though.

Posted: Mon Nov 24, 2008 12:25 am
by Splaktar
Yes, not all Peruvians are racist, but unfortunately many of those in positions of power are racist (ie: many police, city workers, and government employees). And while yes, they do discriminate based for financial reasons (against the 'unfortunate'), it is often towards those that have dark brown skin (not African decent).

We were looking at apartments the other day and the lady showing us the place made an extremely rude comment to my mother in law just because she was Peruvian. In this case it was a matter of financial reasons rather than racism, but it was still offensive. My mother in law hasn't stopped mentioning it since then.

Posted: Tue Nov 25, 2008 12:24 pm
by curlyguy18
You're right, but racism isn't a problem only in Peru but everywhere. A lot of Peruvians try to take advantage of Americans/Europeans because "they have a lot of money" and that is racism as well. I am really sorry to hear your mom in law got discriminated, but it happenes everywhere around the world.

Posted: Tue Nov 25, 2008 12:48 pm
by sonia
deleted by sonia

Posted: Wed Nov 26, 2008 8:38 am
by tupacperu
I admit that financial status is issue in Peru.

But personally that issue does not compare to the racial and ethnic issues in North America.

To the contrary, I find Peruvians very friendly. They are a people who celebrate in the face of poverty and adversity, as compares to NAmericans. IN the current financial crisis there has been a rise in suicide among caucasians. This is becasue we as N. Americans are so tied to THINGS. The media and advertiser are feeding us images of happiness and we go after that like a carrot on a string. That is why there are so many issues with many North Americans, Plastic Surgery, Eating disorder, poor body image, bleached skin, tanning salons
People try to conform to what they see on TV.
Who is setting these expectation?
We have lost our sense of self and who we are. We define ourselves by things.

I love the family parties and celebrations where families come together in Peru (relatives of many colors), foods from the selva, sierra and coast. The diversity is comforting to me. To listen to criolla music and the next rock-n-roll, jazz or rap. To me I fit in, I can be myself and not have to compromise who I am. I am accepted (el negrito) hehehe

This is another reason why I love Peru, It gives me sanity and shows me what in life is real. The struggles of a people to survive and celebrate each waking day, rather that cry over a broken nail or a bad hair day.
Someone once said that our expectations in life as North American are unrealistics, we have grown accustom to believe we expect happiness everyday. when we have a bad day we are devastated. In poor countries a good day is clelebrated becasue they are so few and far between.

Robert Downey put is this way (though he is a druggy)

I used to be so convinced that happiness was the goal, yet all those years I was chasing after it, I was unhappy in my pursuit. Maybe the goal really should be a life that values honor, duty, good work, friends, and family


One thing I find interesting in Peru (man's point of view) is the standard of beauty, there are none (hehehe). There are many women of various complexions and sizes and the skinny model types are not the only standard of beauty.

To reinforce this, the dancers (vedettes) , They are exhuberant women who have a large folowing in Peru. You could not find women liek these in clubs in the USA. So again beauty is truly in the eye of the beholder when it comes to Peru.

Posted: Wed Nov 26, 2008 8:54 am
by Corsaire
[quote="tarollins"]I admit that financial status is issue in Peru.

But personally that issue does not compare to the racial and ethnic issues in North America.

To the contrary, I find Peruvians very friendly. They are a people who celebrate in the face of poverty and adversity, as compares to NAmericans. IN the current financial crisis there has been a rise in suicide among caucasians. This is becasue we as N. Americans are so tied to THINGS. The media and advertiser are feeding us images of happiness and we go after that like a carrot on a string. That is why there are so many issues with many North Americans, Plastic Surgery, Eating disorder, poor body image, bleached skin, tanning salons
People try to conform to what they see on TV.
Who is setting these expectation?
We have lost our sense of self and who we are. We define ourselves by things.
quote]



Tallorins, you have said a lot of truth in a such a condensed writing. I don't have time to elaborate on these interesting issues but a quick explanation is on the video below:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vZ7xx6qs ... re=related

Our thinking, point of views and our behaviors are being manipulated and controlled by big media for self serving purposes......we're just being brainwashed, but this is not new, as you, I'm sure, know. And of course this is exported around the globe, Peru included.
I personally I could care less for TV these days, I used to have like 110 channels I didn't even watch but now I only have very basic channels and search for news and truth on independent venues mostly commercial free.

Best
Brian

Posted: Wed Nov 26, 2008 10:20 am
by rgamarra
That is why there are so many issues with many North Americans, Plastic Surgery, Eating disorder, poor body image, bleached skin, tanning salons
People try to conform to what they see on TV.

To reinforce this, the dancers (vedettes) , They are exhuberant women who have a large folowing in Peru. You could not find women liek these in clubs in the USA.


Plastic Surgery is booming in Peru. The top clinics are working non-stop! I can't tell you the number of nose jobs, liposuction, face lifts etc. from both men and women that I have seen in just one week!

The vedettes are something that Peruvian men can obtain, so it's not some fantasy and in most cases those women really are on sale. The majority of them work in night clubs which basically put are brothels.

The very same vedettes are dying their hair blond having their noses fixed, breasts augmented and skin lightened to look Caucasian.

Turn on the Peruvian television and you'll see Kaita promoting their weight loss and health products. The cable channels are full of exercise equipment, juicers, spanx-like pants, corsets, etc. aimed at beauty AND weight loss!

Consumerism is growing by leaps and bounds in Peru.

Peruvians are racists against anyone they can be racist against in Peru. I went into Wong near Javier Prado and Aviacion and right in the middle of the store an old Peruvian guy shouts "Cholo, C-----a su -----." Sorry, but Peruvians don't hide their racism or prejudices.

I think however that Peruvians are becoming more tolerant, but only towards those that have money. Checking one's "pedigree" is becoming a less important issue as new money flows in and old money wastes away.

Much of the prejudice and racism in Peru now-a-days is at a Socio-Economic level.

Posted: Wed Nov 26, 2008 4:46 pm
by Corsaire
rgamarra wrote:
That is why there are so many issues with many North Americans, Plastic Surgery, Eating disorder, poor body image, bleached skin, tanning salons
People try to conform to what they see on TV.

To reinforce this, the dancers (vedettes) , They are exhuberant women who have a large folowing in Peru. You could not find women liek these in clubs in the USA.


Plastic Surgery is booming in Peru. The top clinics are working non-stop! I can't tell you the number of nose jobs, liposuction, face lifts etc. from both men and women that I have seen in just one week!

The vedettes are something that Peruvian men can obtain, so it's not some fantasy and in most cases those women really are on sale. The majority of them work in night clubs which basically put are brothels.

The very same vedettes are dying their hair blond having their noses fixed, breasts augmented and skin lightened to look Caucasian.

Turn on the Peruvian television and you'll see Kaita promoting their weight loss and health products. The cable channels are full of exercise equipment, juicers, spanx-like pants, corsets, etc. aimed at beauty AND weight loss!

Consumerism is growing by leaps and bounds in Peru.

Peruvians are racists against anyone they can be racist against in Peru. I went into Wong near Javier Prado and Aviacion and right in the middle of the store an old Peruvian guy shouts "Cholo, C----a su -----." Sorry, but Peruvians don't hide their racism or prejudices.

I think however that Peruvians are becoming more tolerant, but only towards those that have money. Checking one's "pedigree" is becoming a less important issue as new money flows in and old money wastes away.

Much of the prejudice and racism in Peru now-a-days is at a Socio-Economic level.


This is all sadly true, but then again it's just a mirror reflection of how it is in the US, where all the consumerism, entertainment saturation and all those stupefying behaviors, the so called "the N american way" is imported from, but here in Lima it takes a "peruvian style" form, of course.

Yes, there's a more openly racism in Peru (descarado). In the US people are more "politically correct" just because they have no choice, like the case of a caucasian guy I met awhile ago who work with some afro-N americans with no problem at all, he even calls some of them friends. I've seen him interact with them just like if he was one of them, but when he's with me or some other caucasian people, he talks despicably of them black, so what gives? There's a lot of hipocrisy. Fortunately, not everybody is like that, just like not every peruvian is like that guy in the supermarket.
I work with three peruvian guys, two of whom I oversee, and the other day one was refering to the other one, in his face, half jokingly: "oh yeah, that how those from his race behave" implying that he was half indian and he himself "whiter" than him. I seriously called him right away on it by saying "we all should be proud of our own heritage. doesn't matter how mixed we are".

Regarding some peruvian women, I'm sorry but I'm going to be brutally honest. You look utterly ridiculous and shows a lot of low-self-esteem when you dye your hair blond over you rather dark mestiza skin. It doesn't suit you, period. Some even go as far as wearing blue color contact lenses. Who are you trying to fool? Yourself, that's for sure.
Don't you realize that you just look fake, very FAKE and plastic? Learn to have a little taste with yourself too. I don't mind a girl dying her hair if so you want, be it to enhance your features or cover some gray hair, but apply a color that compliments your skin color and not far off from your original color. Dying your hair only destroys your natural hair anyway.
To me, nothing like a 'natural' girl. They don't even realize that they can be beautiful by just being natural and themselves. What's wrong with two, big, beautiful black, brown eyes anyway?
On the other hand, I just don't like unnaturally tanned caucasian women, tan salon made. Your skin looks like leather and makes you ugly. What's wrong with being white? Don't believe the bullcrap that you look "washed-out", they're just jealous. You have your own beauty by just being white. It can be very attractive too - specially for latinos.
Women, just be naturally yourselves. We, men, will thank you.

Brian

Posted: Wed Nov 26, 2008 9:08 pm
by curlyguy18
People all over the world are just not content with the way they look and are always trying to look they way they want to look. Light-complected people want to have tan skin, tan-skinned people want to be light-complected, brunettes want to have blonde hair and blondes want to have dark hair. I certainly don't care if people want to look differently from what they are. They can do whatever they feel like they need to do to make themselves happy.

But that doesn't give anyone the right to discriminate. Like rachel said, a lot of Peruvians are very racist and it's mostly at the socio-economical level. Not everyone behaves that way but the vast majority create a stereotype. Do ALL Americans swear? Do ALL American girls get pregnant in college??

Posted: Thu Nov 27, 2008 12:03 am
by tupacperu
Turn on the Peruvian television and you'll see Kaita promoting their weight loss and health products. The cable channels are full of exercise equipment, juicers, spanx-like pants, corsets, etc. aimed at beauty AND weight loss!


Yes, they are all selling an image, the obesity problem will increase as more fast-food companies enter the peruvian market. There is a big problem with obesity and diabetes in the USA. Now it is moving beyond the US borders.


Plastic Surgery is booming in
(correction) Lima. :-)
Yes I do see alot of surgically enhanced people in Lima, but not so many in the provinces.


The socio-economical racism can be change with moving up in social status, hard work and education. But the color of skin will never change.

There is racism in many countries as well as Peru, but not in the magnitude that it exist in the USA.

Maybe it is just me, but race has never been a big issue my 5 years in Peru. Most times the color of my skin never comes up. It is a place where I am not reminded of color constrantly. This is something that I can live with.

When looking at the TV news in Peru, it is very different. When a crime happens in Peru there is not a description of black, white, latino etc.... They are described as criminals. When filling out forms there is not a check box for race.

In the USA, even now after the election all you hear "Black Man in the white house etc......... and it goes on and on. everyday you are reminded of the thing that divides us so much (color of skin).

Posted: Thu Nov 27, 2008 12:16 am
by anuta
tarollins wrote: In the USA, even now after the election all you hear "Black Man in the white house etc......... and it goes on and on. everyday you are reminded of the thing that divides us so much (color of skin).


When Barack Obama was elected, all I heard on the Peruvian TV was how a man "de rasa negra" won the election. Nobody talked about his political views, the sensation was his "race" (many people in N.America accept that there´s no such a thing as a race, it´s been a while I haven´t heard this term on TV).

Posted: Thu Nov 27, 2008 12:31 am
by tupacperu
That's just because you aren't a cholo. If you were you would see that Peru is even more racist and harassing of native Peruvians than the US is of Latinos. Sure you get treated great as a foreigner in Peru, but a lot of natives get treated like dogs just because the color of their skin (and this is in daily life, not just once in a while security related checks).


Quite the contrary, I speak spanish fluently, and I am always asked if I am from Chincha, Brazilian, Colombian or Puerto Rico. I have lived here for 5 years as a resident. Have not had any incident as I have had in the USA .

recently in NY:
There was an Ecuadorian man who was killed by a bunch of young kids. They were out on the town looking for mexicans (in the USA, any spanish speaking person is Mexican). They killed the guy , not knowing he was not a Mexican. To my surprise there was one black kid in the group of 6 who committed this crime. To me that send a message that this is a culture of hate here in the USA and it is alot deeper than I could ever imagine. everyone hates (all races).

Check out the movie CRASH, it says alot about the US. Many of those experiences are the way we live in the USA. Not just a black/white issue, people of many colors are racists.

In Peru, I forget that I am black and no one reminds me in my every day life except the medicine cabinet during my morning shave.

yes, racism it is socio-economic driven in Peru but again with money and education that can change. With money and education racism has not change for me in the US for 54 years.

Yes people with money get treated different in Peru, but they do also in the USA and every other country. It is called privledged :-)

Re: FYI--if you ever plan on leaving Peru indefinitely...

Posted: Thu Mar 18, 2010 9:19 am
by Rusty
Enjoyed the disucssions.

My only problem with CE renewal is that you have to go to downtown Lima. From the outskirts - I live in San Borja - it can take for 30 minutes to 2 hours depending on the traffic.

It would be nice is there was an office away from the center. Parking is hard, traffic is bad and now there is a lot of road repairs during the day.

However the info obtained on this site is just GREAT!!!!!!!!!

Re: FYI--if you ever plan on leaving Peru indefinitely...

Posted: Fri Mar 19, 2010 8:19 am
by american_in_lima
Rusty wrote:Enjoyed the disucssions.

My only problem with CE renewal is that you have to go to downtown Lima. From the outskirts - I live in San Borja - it can take for 30 minutes to 2 hours depending on the traffic.

It would be nice is there was an office away from the center. Parking is hard, traffic is bad and now there is a lot of road repairs during the day.

However the info obtained on this site is just GREAT!!!!!!!!!


I got tired of repeating the annual process as well and decided to go for my citizenship. Now that I have my DNI, I won´t have to go renew until 2017. The cost alone in the money I saved annually as well as the cost in time spent makes up for it. Only drawback is that I have to vote, which to be honest, I see as a benefit, especially since I am living here.

Re: FYI--if you ever plan on leaving Peru indefinitely...

Posted: Sun Mar 21, 2010 10:05 pm
by cuymagico
I know Peruvian Immigrations is relatively easy on us US and Canadian citizens. But are they as easy on, say, Ecuadorians? Bolivians? Chinese? Ethiopians (if one ever came)?

Also, the basic problem is that for those of us on the CE, we have to have a SUNAT declaration every time we leave the country. And effectively that can mean having to get permission from your employer to leave the country, which is potentially giving employers a little too much power. What if you get a phone call in the middle of the night that a close loved one in your home country died? Do you really want to have to worry about the flack you'll get leaving or re-entering the country? Seriously, while Peruvian Immigration is being so generous about many other things (up to and including granting full citizenship after a very short time), could they talk to their friends at SUNAT about lightening up on this one point?

Also, it is simply wrong that every complaint about something in Peru is met with a counter-complaint about something in the complainer's home country. Those are almost impossible to make, apples-to-oranges comparisons that in the end do nothing to improve the situation in either country. Let's have a separate thread for US Immigrations issues--the two are not tied together.

Re: FYI--if you ever plan on leaving Peru indefinitely...

Posted: Tue Mar 23, 2010 10:31 am
by falcon123
Every country in the world has a series of procedures to deal with its residents and
citizens.

If you are not a citizen, obviously you will be required to do some paperwork that
will never change no matter where you are.

Peru is no worse or better than other countries in this case, an to my surprise there is
even some improvement.

Re: FYI--if you ever plan on leaving Peru indefinitely...

Posted: Tue Mar 23, 2010 6:07 pm
by euroman
Peruvian immigration is easy.

You enter the country and you can stay 183 days. Then you can cross the border to get another 183 days.
Or you stay more than 183 days and pay 1 dollar for every day you stay extra.
THAT`S IT.
If you area gringo with too much money, you waste some money and time with buying a CE or visa. But that's not necessary.

Re: FYI--if you ever plan on leaving Peru indefinitely...

Posted: Wed Apr 28, 2010 9:22 am
by Rusty
Followed advise, and went directly to 3rd floor. Had all papers, copy of Carnet, Passport, letter leaving, etc.
Did not have notorized letter. Had to get it.
After that it took about 1/2 hour to get carnet canceled .
NOTE: you only have 10 days in country after you canceled.

Really great help.

Rusty

Re: FYI--if you ever plan on leaving Peru indefinitely...

Posted: Wed Jun 08, 2011 3:40 pm
by travelvice
A relevant post for all those searching for this topic (to cancel or not to cancel), as I was:
Departing Peru with CE and no annual fee paid:
http://www.expatperu.com/expatforums/vi ... =1&t=14138