Positives and negatives of raising children in Peru

Answers to your qestions about moving to, and living in, Peru,
gcoul99
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Positives and negatives of raising children in Peru

Postby gcoul99 » Wed May 13, 2009 11:02 pm

What have been the positives and negatives you have experienced raising children in Peru and how have you overcome the negatives.


gcoul99
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Postby gcoul99 » Thu May 14, 2009 7:47 pm

The reason why I post this is to hear some responses on how the people who have been living in peru with kids have adapted. I have been here for about 5 months now with my 4 year old daughter and my 1 year old son. I am Canadian but was living in the bay area for the last 6 years. The bay area has a multitude of activities and parks for kids. The parks are amazing, museums, outdoor activities, etc. From my experience, it's harder to find quality activites, parks etc, in and around Lima but I'm guessing these things can be found. This is the challenge. Ofcourse, I'm sure there are other challenges that I'm not aware of as well and that is why I post this. Anyhow, would be great to hear some responses.

So for me:

Positives:
-increase my daughter's fluency in spanish.
-affordable help (i.e. nanny house cleaner)
-Closer to my wife's family.
-cheap help around the house.
-Friendly people.

Negatives
-lack of parks from what I can tell. Parks do not have the same play structures.
-Lack of activities setup for kids (perhaps there are several business possibilities if my presumption is correct.
-Quality of the activities. Swimming lessons, gymastics lessons: The instructors, in some cases, don't seem like they have had any training in teaching kids.
-Seems there are some bad habits to be picked up as well from some of the kids I hear. I see peru on their way to the same obesity issue the U.S. now has (at least with the upper class). Anyhow, that's another can of worms.
-closer to my wife's family

I guess you get the idea.

What I have done to overcome this:
-we enrolled my daugther in a good school that seems to have a lot of activities (sports, crafts, etc).

Hopefully I get some responses. I'm sure there is a lot of good information out there for people who have adapted to living here with kids.

Thanks!
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inscop
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Postby inscop » Thu May 14, 2009 10:49 pm

I know little about raising children, even less about raising them in Peru. HOWEVER, I remember a post a few months ago from someone looking for baby food in jars in Lima, and I saw that stuff at the Vivanda at the esquina Benevides and Alcanfores. I figured this is a good a place as any to mention that. Of course, the rugrat is probably eating pollo a la braza by now.
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schools??

Postby migsopt » Fri May 15, 2009 8:09 am

I was curious if anyone knew the cost to send kids to one of the schools that teach in English.
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Postby Alpineprince » Fri May 15, 2009 9:27 am

I live in front of the Faro in Miraflores and I can tell you there are more parks here then you can "shake a stick at"! They even have a "dog park" for the dogs to play like back in the states. When my son gets older they have a BMX and skateboard park as well within walking distance. There is an area in S.I. that also has many beautiful little parks and it is also a bit less expensive than here on the Malecon.
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Postby Mommyof2Angels » Fri May 15, 2009 2:10 pm

i have my 3 children here in peru with us. they are 6 months, almost 20 month old, and a 7 year old.

i have found that there are plenty of activities if you just ask people. theres always something going on, and the weekly peru digest helps me find things for them. we like sinichi rocha, its here in comas, and its 1 sol 50 to get in. theres animals(like a zoo), go carts, a HUGE play area, a swimming pool with all the bells and whistles( we dont venture into there though) a pond, arcade games, kiosks, a restaurant, and horseback riding. it is def. worth it. we live close, and that makes it even better.

theres a multitude of palces to go here in lima...not just parks.

my kids are spoiled rotten by family. they play with their cousins all the time, they ahve their own rooms here in my mother in laws house, and they are well cared for. do your inlaws spend alot of time with your children? that should help them learn spanish even faster. family is so important. thats why we didnt move very far from ours. i couldnt live a day with out my sister in laws or my mother in law! we are seriously like best friends. i havent changed a dirty diaper in months! or cooked for that matter! with all this help, its so worth it to live here in comas.
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Postby Mommyof2Angels » Fri May 15, 2009 2:13 pm

also, what type of bad habits are you talking about? i am sure that even in the bay area or anywhere else there are bad habits to be picked up......

and the obesity thing....i wouldnt worry about other children just your own. keep feeding them healthy, well balanced meals......there are obese children everywhere as well. my daughter is 7 and is as thin as a stick, but a friend of hers is obese and 8 years old....i have no problems letting her play with her?
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Postby gcoul99 » Fri May 15, 2009 3:08 pm

Thanks so far. So basically keep asking and hope I stumble onto to these things. So in asking:

- Where are the best parks.
-Libraries?
-How can I get my daughter on a soccer team, gymnastics club, swimming lessons.
-Any skating rinks here. I've heard rumours..being from Canada I'm either going to have to find one, invest in some inline skates, or build my own.
-Any recommendable museums.
-other ideas. I've been impressed with the zoo's here.
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Postby Kelly » Fri May 15, 2009 3:22 pm

Kennedy Park in Miraflores has a pretty nice play area, but it is usually super crowded. I've heard Parque de la Amistad in Surco is fun, with a small lake with I believe peddle boats. In warmer weather, Parque de la Reservas near the National Stadium is fun, to go play in the fountains, or in any weather just to watch them - especially at night, the light and water show is pretty impressive.

My boys have taken swimming lessons every summer at the San Borja sports complex, just off of Angamos behind the Plaza Vea Primavera. They also have martial arts, basketball and futbol there - and unless it's changed, there was a decent little play area there, with jungle gyms and such.

My boys liked the natural history museum, because they had real dinosaur bones (fossils). It was scary and fun for them when they were little.
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Re: schools??

Postby naturegirl » Fri May 15, 2009 6:04 pm

migsopt wrote:I was curious if anyone knew the cost to send kids to one of the schools that teach in English.


Depends on what you mean by English schools. Roosevelt is about 6K for admission and about 1K a month, that's in dollars. Other good English schools run about 3 to 5 K for admission and 500 to 1K a month for tuiton.

Non.international schools will be less.
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Postby naturegirl » Fri May 15, 2009 6:07 pm

gcoul99 wrote:--Libraries?
-How can I get my daughter on a soccer team, gymnastics club, swimming lessons.
-Any skating rinks here. I've heard rumours..being from Canada I'm either going to have to find one, invest in some inline skates, or build my own.
-Any recommendable museums.


Libraries. YOu can try ICPNA and Britanico, but if you so much as bend a page you'll get fined and banned. PUblic libraries, supposedly some of the munis have them , but I haven't found them. THere's a twice yearly book sale at Church of the GOod Shepherd. And you might try to swap books with other families.

For soccer, etc, try the school, or else there are little clubs that might offer it.

Museums, I've heard the Italian Art one was good and the Museo de Oro should be avoided. If you buy the LIma Survivial Guide, there's a section in it for kids.
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Postby Alan Didak » Fri May 15, 2009 8:57 pm

-'ves.

- School starts too early. SHould start at 9am.
- Lack of general freedom for kids to play and venture off far from home safe.

+'ves.


?
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Postby Kelly » Sat May 16, 2009 12:44 am

- School starts too early. SHould start at 9am.


That depends on the school, my boys don't go to class until 1 in the afternoon.


Lack of general freedom for kids to play and venture off far from home safe.


I'd say that depends too... my kids ride their bikes to the parks in our neighborhood and walk the dogs, run errands to the bodega for me.. but my oldest is 12 and they speak Spanish, so it's a little different situation for us.


pluses... My kids aren't even in their teens yet, but they've climbed Huayna Picchu, played in jungle waterfalls, spent a morning watching a family of monkeys, run through an afternoon downpour in the rain forest....

There's Huampani (http://www.cvhuampani.com/), not far away, which is fun for a weekend. Or take a weekend camping trip to Canta (http://www.enjoyperu.com/peru_travel_tours_information/peru_travel_destinations/peru_lima/lima-peru-surroundings-canta.html)


Another thing my kids loved was going to the San Franciscan monastery and touring the catacombs. The Inquisition museum was kind of hokey (not the information, but the displays), but gruesome enough that the kids were fascinated. You have to ask for English guides, though. [url][/url]
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Postby luna chica » Sun May 17, 2009 4:53 pm

There are many positives to raising children here in Peru. In general Peru is a very child friendly country. For example in my condo complex there is a playground and mini football field and millions of kids for my son to play with.
After school activities are more affordable here than in other countries. Home help is affordable so I have more time to spend with my son, not worrying about whether the washing up and ironing are done. We can get a babysitter too so mummy and daddy get to have a relationship, which makes us a stronger family unit.
I think there is a lot of potential for educating children to have a social conscience. Children are confronted with the sight of children the same age selling candies on the street at night when they should be at home.
The down side may be that our children grow up in very privileged circumstances attending "pituco"schools and may become that way themselves. I am Australian and we tend to be very egalitarian and anti separating ourselves into social levels, whereas here those distinctions are very clear and reinforced. Some children treat their hired-help badly and it is important that they learn to respect people and treat them fairly regardless of their social standing or how much money they earn.
I worry that my son attending a very prestigious school may learn to value people's appearance and material possessions above substance.
Overall though I think the benefits of being here outweigh the negatives.
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Re:

Postby Texasmom » Sat Mar 03, 2018 9:12 pm

Our family is visiting Peru for a month this summer from July to August. We have two boys- 6 and 7. Do you have a babysitter you recommend or know of someone who could recommend someone?
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Re: Positives and negatives of raising children in Peru

Postby gringolandia » Sun Mar 04, 2018 2:12 am

Being from the US, you might want to consider the Colegio Roosevelt Winter Camp:

http://blog.amersol.edu.pe/winter_camp/

That's a way to keep your boys occupied and perhaps meet some friends.

As far as a babysitter, that's a bit different from how things usually work here as most people hire full time live-in nannies, and for such a short term that could be difficult for you. Presumably you'll have to use a nanny agency (which most people try to avoid if possible) and pay a premium to get an already trained adult who is responsible and trustworthy. Usually a full time live-in nanny costs something around 1000 to 1200 soles a month, but my guess is that you may have to pay two to three times that even for a part-time babysitter.
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Re: Positives and negatives of raising children in Peru

Postby natalie_vs » Tue Apr 03, 2018 11:16 am

Hi gringolandia,

Do you know if Roosevelt winter camp is open for everyone or just for the registered students?
I am planning to bring my children, ages 5 and 3, to visit family in Lima in June and/or July. I need to keep them busy.

Thanks!

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