Reasons Why I Became "Peruvian" - Peruvian Citizen

Answers to your qestions about moving to, and living in, Peru,
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Reasons Why I Became "Peruvian" - Peruvian Citizen

Postby american_in_lima » Fri Sep 04, 2009 2:04 am

Hi Friends:

I just became a Peruvian citizen and did all of the paperwork myself without the help of a lawyer or any third parties.

I was married to a Peruvian for quite some time and decided to hold off on my divorce after separating so that I could become a Peruvian citizen first.


I now have dual citizenship (American/Peruvian).

If anyone, has any questions, on how, let me know. I have a couple of Expat friends that have been here for a while and to me, there are real benefits to being "Peruvian".

Obviously, every case is different, but for me, the pros outweigh the cons.

Benefits or Reasons why I decided to become Peruvian:

1. Annual Money Savings for Renewal of Carnet at Migraciones

2. Owning Property or Assets - With a Carnet, you are technically a guest of Peru. Why should I be a guest in a place where I have my home, car, business?

3. If you leave Peru for more than 6 months, you lose your Peruvian residency. If there is some sort of emergency and I need to leave, I would have lost my residency. I would rather not have to worry about it and be Peruvian for life.

As a Peruvian, I could leave for the next 30 years, come back and I am still Peruvian. I just need to vote at my local consulate or pay a fine. Because all of my legal documents with my house, car, business are tied to my Carnet, they would have to reissue me a new Carnet number.

Imagine, having to change all of those documents again? Of course, with a DNI, you have to as well, but the fact of losing a visa and having to start the whole process over again could be tedious and quite a bother.

4. Latin America has a history of taking away assets from foreigners. Although unlikely again, Cuba, Venezuela and even Peru have done it. I would rather be Peruvian if that happens again. The politician Humala, who received something like 45% of the initial vote, had that idea. Not sure if he meant personal assets as well, but he was looking to take over foreign investment. Not worth taking the chance.

5. Travel - As an American, going to Brazil, I needed to pay $100 for a visa at the Brazilian Embassy. As a Peruvian, I can show up to Brazil with just my DNI. Also, Cuba as Peruvian instead of American. I can get in as an American, but not worth the risk.

6. Work - Countries like Argentina, let you work legally for two years as a Peruvian. My feeling is that South America, will one day have a covenant like the European Union. You never know for business purposes.

7. No more "Tramites" - No more going to migraciones every year, waiting in lines, going to the bank, etcetera. All this, just to be a guest in a country where I have invested all of my time, money, energy and soul.

8. Kids - No matter, where I live in the world or who I marry, my future kids could be born in France, but they will be considered American and Peruvian as well because their father is "Peruvian" . Pretty cool for the family tree.


Thoughts and comments are welcome.


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dual citizenship

Postby pingouin59 » Fri Sep 04, 2009 10:49 am

Hi,

I have a dual citizenship: French- US. Very soon I will ne married to my lovely Peruvian fiancee and we want to Travel to the US and eventually go back to live in Europe. What are the tramites for her to get all the necessary visas?
Other question, when God bless us with a baby, can it be Peruvian, French and American or will we have to choose?
Last but not least, once married, how long does it take to have a legal work permit?
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Postby american_in_lima » Fri Sep 04, 2009 11:11 am

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Postby naturegirl » Fri Sep 04, 2009 12:32 pm

Here's the thing about US, have you lived there for 5 years, three of those being after the age of 14? Can you prove it with passports, transcripts, etc? If you can, then yes, your baby will be American. IF NOT, then No, your baby won't, IF it's born abroad. If it's born itn eh US, then everything's golden.

As for French, I don't know

Peruvian, Yes, the baby can be.

Visas, check with France. I can only tell you how YOU can live here legally. Expect, after being married, the visa process to take about 2 or 3 months.
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Postby naturegirl » Fri Sep 04, 2009 12:43 pm

Ok, I did the same too.

Here were my reasons.
No going to immigrations
NO showing taxes forms when I left. american in lima, I don't know how you've never had to show tax forms, gues you were lucky.

Negatives for me, voting, but that's no problem, I'll just pay the fine.
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Postby american_in_lima » Fri Sep 04, 2009 12:56 pm

With a PEB (Married to a Peruvian), you don't have to show the form.

If you give them a form, they will take it as they themselves don't know the laws.
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Kind a off topin

Postby pingouin59 » Fri Sep 04, 2009 1:11 pm

You know about long distance relationships? well I am right now experiencing long distance divorce. I am looking for a place where I could notarize legal documents. Went to the US Embassy rhe other day. Took me an hour to get there If you know a place close to Los Olivos, like Near Mega Plaza on Panamerican Norte,let me know.

Thank you for all your answers
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Postby american_in_lima » Fri Sep 04, 2009 1:17 pm

pingouin59 - Not sure how your questions relate to the topic at hand.
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Postby Amerijewvian » Fri Sep 04, 2009 1:18 pm

Wow, I didn't know that about Brazil, guess I do now and will have to pay the fee this time. My paperwork is pending due to a lot of obstacles but fortunately we know what we have to do now. I just have to leave the country (since my Visa expired and so did my husband's) and I have to bring our marriage license to the Peruvian Embassy in FL for some other bogus reasons we ran into here in Lima they are not accepting our marriage license. Luckily my husband is going to FL at the end of the month and we are going to Brazil in October.
Patience is a virtue in this country.

american_in_lima: do you know if the Interpol paperwork has an expiration date if it was filed before all other paperwork? You may PM me. Thanks.
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Postby pingouin59 » Fri Sep 04, 2009 1:33 pm

Well, since we were talking about administartive stuff...
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Postby american_in_lima » Fri Sep 04, 2009 1:39 pm

My topic was actually talking about the benefits of naturalization, not the step by step process of where an embassy is in regards to other areas for example.

Read the Ultimate List, there is lots of information that will answer 99% of your questions.
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Postby mahou123 » Fri Sep 04, 2009 2:28 pm

American in Lima, congratulations on becoming Peruvian. I´m going the same way, just at early stage right now. Should get Peruvian citizenship in 2 years.

You´ve made a good list of benefits. I´d just add that you can also join a political party and get a licence to carry a firearm. There are also some freebies from the government, like ´techo propio´ programme, but I hope you don´t need them.

I´ve got some reservations about travel though. Yes, you can save $100 in Brazil and Chile (both follow reciprocal principle in visa issues), $20 in Indonesia, and go to Hong Kong and South Africa without visa. As well as all the Latin America. For the rest of the world though, you´d have to use another passport. Almost all other countries require Peruvians to apply for a visa beforehand. I find it politically very wrong. Peru is a free Western democracy, with booming modern economy and one of the most liberal immigration legislations in the world, so I don´t see any practical reason, apart from racial discrimination of Amerindians, of this requirement. EU, US and others would be much better off opening the borders for Peruvians, they would get a cheap and educated labor force and a good increase in international trade with Peru. I just hope it will happen one day.
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Postby naturegirl » Fri Sep 04, 2009 2:56 pm

Long distance divorce, I advice you to get a lawyer, then they should be able to legal the stuff for you in the US embassy.

Amerijewvian. About the American marriage license. That's standard procedure. All foreign docs have to be legalised abroad, then legalised here, then translated and legalised again.

As for INTERPOL, it's good for 30 days.

And if the ULP doesn't answer your questions, let me know and I'll try to update it so that it does.

Mahou, You don't need a visa for Korea either, can stay up to 90 days. And I think that you'll find Asia is more open to Peruvians than other parts of the world. Japan, you used to be able to travel visa free, not sure if that's true any longer. I believe the reason that so many countries wANT Peruvians to have visas is becuase they enter on tourist visas and simply don't leave.

And Argentina, Chile, Bolivia AND Brazil all charge you. http://rachelinperu.wordpress.com/2008/ ... u-134-usd/
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Postby anuta » Fri Sep 04, 2009 3:08 pm

mahou123 wrote:
Almost all other countries require Peruvians to apply for a visa beforehand. I find it politically very wrong. Peru is a free Western democracy, with booming modern economy and one of the most liberal immigration legislations in the world, so I don´t see any practical reason, apart from racial discrimination of Amerindians, of this requirement. EU, US and others would be much better off opening the borders for Peruvians, they would get a cheap and educated labor force and a good increase in international trade with Peru. I just hope it will happen one day.


Just like Naturegirl said, it´s not discrimination, many Peruvians want to leave Peru (most of my bf´s family left in the past couple of years, to Canada, US, Spain and Japan!) and the easiest way is to come as tourists and work under the table. I see many of these people in Canada (to be fair, not only Peruvians), so while it´s frustrating to those who just want to go on vacation, it´s understandable.

As for the naturalisation, if you plan to live in Peru "forever", then of course it's worth, at least just to avoid the tramites. Once you become a Peruvian, can you abosh your citizenship later ? Just curious
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Postby american_in_lima » Fri Sep 04, 2009 4:58 pm

Anuta wrote:
mahou123 wrote:
Almost all other countries require Peruvians to apply for a visa beforehand. I find it politically very wrong. Peru is a free Western democracy, with booming modern economy and one of the most liberal immigration legislations in the world, so I don´t see any practical reason, apart from racial discrimination of Amerindians, of this requirement. EU, US and others would be much better off opening the borders for Peruvians, they would get a cheap and educated labor force and a good increase in international trade with Peru. I just hope it will happen one day.


Just like Naturegirl said, it´s not discrimination, many Peruvians want to leave Peru (most of my bf´s family left in the past couple of years, to Canada, US, Spain and Japan!) and the easiest way is to come as tourists and work under the table. I see many of these people in Canada (to be fair, not only Peruvians), so while it´s frustrating to those who just want to go on vacation, it´s understandable.

As for the naturalisation, if you plan to live in Peru "forever", then of course it's worth, at least just to avoid the tramites. Once you become a Peruvian, can you abosh your citizenship later ? Just curious




Anuta: Yes you can. Of course, there is a form you can fill out for that! That's the beautiful thing about being Peruvian. You don't have to live here forever, but you keep your citizenship.
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Postby mahou123 » Fri Sep 04, 2009 6:27 pm

Anuta wrote:Just like Naturegirl said, it´s not discrimination, many Peruvians want to leave Peru (most of my bf´s family left in the past couple of years, to Canada, US, Spain and Japan!) and the easiest way is to come as tourists and work under the table. I see many of these people in Canada (to be fair, not only Peruvians), so while it´s frustrating to those who just want to go on vacation, it´s understandable.


naturegirl wrote: I believe the reason that so many countries wANT Peruvians to have visas is becuase they enter on tourist visas and simply don't leave.


That is exactly what you and me and a lot of other people on this forum did. Entered as a tourist and still here. It is OK to do it for us, it benefits us, benefits Peru. Even though many of such expats work under the table, avoid taxes and occupy jobs that otherwise would go to a local person.

However, for Peruvian person to do the same thing the other way around is not ok. Peruvian passport holder gets different treatment based on nationality. It is assumed that Peruvian is likely to do something bad, on grounds some other Peruvians did something wrong in the past, but not based on this particular person´s record. This fits the definition of racial discrimination, however understandable it might be.
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Postby LauraMH » Fri Sep 04, 2009 7:13 pm

Thanks for sharing this information. It is helpful. I too am 2 years away from making the decision but leaning toward it. I think in the end it will be easier. You clearly list pros. There seem to be few cons. It gives options and it's more permanent than residency.

Did you have to change your name?

You mention changing your documentation with you new datos. So I'm wondering I purchased land with my passport. I suppose when I get my carnet I need to have the documents noted with the new ID info?
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Postby naturegirl » Fri Sep 04, 2009 7:18 pm

mahou123 wrote:That is exactly what you and me and a lot of other people on this forum did. Entered as a tourist and still here. It is OK to do it for us, it benefits us, benefits Peru. Even though many of such expats work under the table, avoid taxes and occupy jobs that otherwise would go to a local person. .


actually, I entered on a diplomatic visa. I never overstayed my visa. Statistic wise, comparing Americans and Peruvians, I'm willing to bet that more Peruvians overstay visas than Americans, which is why countries require them to get visa beforehand.

LauraMH wrote:Did you have to change your name?

You mention changing your documentation with you new datos. So I'm wondering I purchased land with my passport. I suppose when I get my carnet I need to have the documents noted with the new ID info?


Yes, I was forced to change my name TWICE.

My name was for example, Sharon Smith de Jimenez
My naturalisation cert said Sharon Smith Doe (Doe being my mom's maiden name)
Then I went to RENIEC and said I could be Sharon Smith Doe
OR Sharon Smith Doe de JImenez, but could not be Sharon Smith de Jimenez, which is what is on my US Passport and papers. I guess I could have kept it at Sharon Smith Doe, but then my husband's name wouldn't be part of my name. I was told that before you could be Sharon Smith de Jimenez, but they just recetly changed the laws. So you either have father's last name, mother's last name. OR father's last name, mother's last name, de husband's last name. What a night mare!

I was told it's because ALL Peruvians MUST have two names. american in lima said that he didn't have to change his name, don't know what's going on with that, but I say, wait until you get your naturalisation cert :shock:

And yep, all docs have to be changed. INcluding property. It's pretty easy, go to SUNARP with all papers and they process it in 7 days.
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Postby kopite » Fri Sep 04, 2009 7:39 pm

Isn't it a shame that foreigners in the US cannot get US citizenship with the ease with which the first poster received Peruvian citizenship?

I think you may wish to consider the reasons foreigners in Cuba had thier properties confiscated.
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Postby jude » Fri Sep 04, 2009 8:13 pm

The first poster was married to a Peruvian when he got citizenship. A Peruvian married to an American can also get US citizenship fairly easily.
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Postby LauraMH » Fri Sep 04, 2009 8:51 pm

LauraMH wrote:Did you have to change your name?

You mention changing your documentation with you new datos. So I'm wondering I purchased land with my passport. I suppose when I get my carnet I need to have the documents noted with the new ID info?


Yes, I was forced to change my name TWICE.

My name was for example, Sharon Smith de Jimenez
My naturalisation cert said Sharon Smith Doe (Doe being my mom's maiden name)
Then I went to RENIEC and said I could be Sharon Smith Doe
OR Sharon Smith Doe de JImenez, but could not be Sharon Smith de Jimenez, which is what is on my US Passport and papers. I guess I could have kept it at Sharon Smith Doe, but then my husband's name wouldn't be part of my name. I was told that before you could be Sharon Smith de Jimenez, but they just recetly changed the laws. So you either have father's last name, mother's last name. OR father's last name, mother's last name, de husband's last name. What a night mare!

I was told it's because ALL Peruvians MUST have two names. american in lima said that he didn't have to change his name, don't know what's going on with that, but I say, wait until you get your naturalisation cert :shock:

And yep, all docs have to be changed. INcluding property. It's pretty easy, go to SUNARP with all papers and they process it in 7 days.[/quote]

I remember that you said that was the case at one time and it seems like a nightmare. So it's really given me pause to think. I don't want to go through all of that twice. I'd really like to just have the name I want.

In the US you changed your name legally? You changed to just de Jimenez and dropped the paternal last name? I'm really trying to figure out what I want to do. I wasn't planning on changing anything in the USA. I'll just make my name what I want, but it will stay the same legally.

Where is this Peruvian law about the names? It is migraciones that could give a good answer. I guess it doesn't matter since it will be 2 years until I can apply and who knows what the situation will be, but I'd like to change to my name here in Peru at least, but I don't want to do it twice. I guess I'll just see how it goes for others in the near future.

So what is your name now in both countries?
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Postby anuta » Fri Sep 04, 2009 11:19 pm

mahou123 wrote:That is exactly what you and me and a lot of other people on this forum did. Entered as a tourist and still here. It is OK to do it for us, it benefits us, benefits Peru. Even though many of such expats work under the table, avoid taxes and occupy jobs that otherwise would go to a local person.

However, for Peruvian person to do the same thing the other way around is not ok. Peruvian passport holder gets different treatment based on nationality. It is assumed that Peruvian is likely to do something bad, on grounds some other Peruvians did something wrong in the past, but not based on this particular person´s record. This fits the definition of racial discrimination, however understandable it might be.


Every country has a right to decide who enters it, nothing wrong with that and I guess Peru is interested in foreigners. We don´t get any benefits from the Peruvian gouverment, normally expats come here with their money which they earn abroad and spend in Peru, so the country only benefits. For instance in Canada, many people (including Peruvians) enter as tourists to ask for a refugee status, they get free medicare, free language classes, free school, welfare and then work under the table so that they don´t pay the taxes. I don´t judge them, but you can understand why Canada would want to control the entry. They recently started requiring an entry visa for Mexicans too because of too many bogus refugee applications.

By reading this forum, I don´t have the impression that many expats take jobs from the Peruvians.
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Postby american_in_lima » Sat Sep 05, 2009 8:26 am

Concerning the name: Your exact Peruvian identity will be exactly written by what is written on your Carnet de Extranjeria.

For Females, there is no need to change your documentation in your birth country.

My ex, here in Peru, had her first name, middle name, father name, mother name plus "de" my last name.

In the states, she just had her first name plus my last name. We never had any issues with mortgage documents, banks, employers, etc.



If you want to use your mother's maiden name on your DNI, then when you apply for your carnet de extranjeria, make sure you fill out the carnet application with such.

In my case, I just put my last name from my father. Hence, that's what showed on my Carnet. From the carnet, when you become Peruvian, they copy the information from your carnet and that information is what they must use when they register you as a Peruvian.

On a final note, changing your documents with your bank, house, etc is not very difficult. I would rather do that, then go to "migraciones" every year to renew my Carnet.

Someone mentioned that I did not mention the "cons" to being naturalized. Not sure if there are any. I don't see the right to vote as a negative.


Updating your identification from your Carnet to your new DNI, could be considered a CON, but it's such an easy thing to do, not sure its really worth mentioning as a negative.
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Postby Chiclayo gringo » Sat Sep 05, 2009 10:22 am

Let me add another reason to the opening post. Pride. First and foremost I will always be an American, but that won’t stop me from feeling proud the day I become a Peruvian.

Tom
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Postby naturegirl » Sat Sep 05, 2009 11:07 am

Laura, those names aren-t my real names. BUt yes, in the US, I am now Sharon Smith de Jimenez. But honestly, for the US, you can do whatever you want. Keep it, change it, etc.

As for the Peruvian law_ NO IDEA. NOthing seems to make sense.

In the US: Sharon Smith de Jimenez
In Peru> Sharon Smith Doe de Jimenez

american_in_lima wrote:Concerning the name: Your exact Peruvian identity will be exactly written by what is written on your Carnet de Extranjeria. From the carnet, when you become Peruvian, they copy the information from your carnet and that information is what they must use when they register you as a Peruvian.


American in LIma, Again, sorry. I disagree. My CE said Sharon Smith de Jimenez, when I got my naturalisation cert, they had added my mother-s name. I went to talk to all the people in the immigration office and they said that-s just the way things are. If it-s different for you, I really don-t know what to say, except maybe rules are different for men and women. My mother-s maiden name hasn-t been used by her nor I in the past 30 yeasr. Wasn-t on my CE, they simply took it from my birth certificate, without asking. As for it being the info that they MUST use, maybe in theory, but in practice, speaking from experience, it-s NOT what they did.
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Postby mahou123 » Sat Sep 05, 2009 11:45 am

naturegirl wrote:
Statistic wise, comparing Americans and Peruvians, I'm willing to bet that more Peruvians overstay visas than Americans, which is why countries require them to get visa beforehand.



Certainly not in Irak :D

Seriously, there can't be any meaningful statistic. Peruvians do overstay visas, because they required to have them in the first place. But assuming the person will overstay, just because he/she holds Peruvian passport - that is discrimination.

Peru has an open border for everyone. I'm not sure if any foreign nationals require Peruvian visa as a sticker in the passport, for which you apply at overseas consulate, pay fee and supply valid reason for the travel which they check. Anyone can come in, and the reason for travel is not regulated, can be anything. Just a stamp in the passport. Worst thing that can happen, $1 a day fine after half a year, not a big deal. This shows how advanced the Peruvian society is. It is free of xenophobia and has no enemies. No one thinks that foreigner would plan a terrorist attack or a coup d'etat, will increase the crime rate or milk the social security.

It would be good if countries in the north, especially the ones that have FTA with Peru, would take the reciprocal approach and open the border to Peruvians. Allow free movement of people first, and then solve the problems. Cut freebies for false refugees, then not many people will come there. Otherwise it's not a free trade at all. To be fair, I see it slowly happening with the USA (easier for Peruvian to get visa now), which is good. Every other 'western' country will follow US after some time, as they usually do.
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Postby american_in_lima » Sat Sep 05, 2009 1:17 pm

Chiclayo gringo wrote:Let me add another reason to the opening post. Pride. First and foremost I will always be an American, but that won’t stop me from feeling proud the day I become a Peruvian.

Tom


Tom:

That is another great Pro. I am very proud to say that I am Peruvian. By the way, Peruvians as well, light up when I tell them I went through all the tramites to be Peruvian. They usually give me a big handshake, hug or kiss to congratulate me. I must have had over 50 of my Peruvian friends call me the day that I officially became Peruvian to congratulate their new paisano.

Great addition to my post Tom. Thank you!
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Postby Kelly » Sat Sep 05, 2009 7:34 pm

Personally, I can't wait until the day I can proudly say I'm Peruana. Hopefully, I'll be a citizen by this time next year.
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Postby american_in_lima » Sat Sep 05, 2009 7:47 pm

Kelly - You will feel great, trust me. If you need any help on the steps when that day comes, let me know. It took 6 weeks from start to finish once I sumbitted the paperwork. I do have to go back in a week or two, to pick up my titulo, which with that I can get my DNI and passport.But as of now, I am in the books as a Peruvian. They count you as a "Peruano nacido al extranjero", which makes sense.
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Re: dual citizenship

Postby alyscamps1 » Sat Sep 05, 2009 9:39 pm

pingouin59 wrote:Hi,

I have a dual citizenship: French- US. Very soon I will ne married to my lovely Peruvian fiancee and we want to Travel to the US and eventually go back to live in Europe. What are the tramites for her to get all the necessary visas?
Other question, when God bless us with a baby, can it be Peruvian, French and American or will we have to choose?
Last but not least, once married, how long does it take to have a legal work permit?


Enfin un français sur ce site !

- pour ton épouse, le visa pour la France est automatique ou presque, et il est habituellement de 4 ans, courts séjours et entrées multiples, au titre de "conjoint de français",

- pour le bb, il est binational si tu le déclares aussi au consulat dans les 48h de la naissance.

N'hésite pas si tu as des questions.
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Postby Kelly » Sun Sep 06, 2009 12:48 am

I hate to be a spoil sport, but remember this is an English language forum - can you put an English translation with your post? Thanks!
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Postby stuart » Sun Sep 06, 2009 9:18 pm

I wanted to do want American In Lima suggested and on my CE application put my mothers maiden name as my apellido materno so I could have two last names. Unfortunately, they said I couldn't, that the CE has to be exactly the same as the passport.

I have the right to be Peruvian in two months time. But that is also the month in which my British passport expires. So I plan to keep things simple by keeping them time consuming... I'll renew my passport, transfer my visa, renew my carnet and maybe become Peruvian next year some time, maybe before foreigner tax time.

If I do get my DNI, I'd like to have my apellido materno on it, yet not have my apellido materno as my surname in the UK (as my fathers surname is rare and has to be preserved.) We'll see.
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Postby american_in_lima » Mon Sep 07, 2009 11:38 am

[quote="stuart"]I wanted to do want American In Lima suggested and on my CE application put my mothers maiden name as my apellido materno so I could have two last names. Unfortunately, they said I couldn't, that the CE has to be exactly the same as the passport.

Stuart: I also would like to have my mother's last name on my DNI.

This is what I am going to do. I need to get my DNI next week. With my DNI, my name will be written as it is on my carnet. I then, will need to change the name on my DNI. That is what the naturalization department told me I needed to do.

I will let you know, how it goes. I will only do it to preserve my mother's maiden name . After my uncle passes, the last name will be lost, so I want to preserve is as long as possible.
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Postby stuart » Mon Sep 07, 2009 11:52 am

american_in_lima wrote:
stuart wrote:I wanted to do want American In Lima suggested and on my CE application put my mothers maiden name as my apellido materno so I could have two last names. Unfortunately, they said I couldn't, that the CE has to be exactly the same as the passport.

Stuart: I also would like to have my mother's last name on my DNI.

This is what I am going to do. I need to get my DNI next week. With my DNI, my name will be written as it is on my carnet. I then, will need to change the name on my DNI. That is what the naturalization department told me I needed to do.

I will let you know, how it goes. I will only do it to preserve my mother's maiden name . After my uncle passes, the last name will be lost, so I want to preserve is as long as possible.


OK, that sounds like an ok way to go about it. As well as preserving names, it is also a lot less hassle to have two surnames here. Depending where you go, some people are wise to it... "solo un apellido, verdad?" but other times it can be irritating. Can't remember where, but I remember someone had to go get their supervisor because they didn't believe me, or the system wouldn't work or something - and that was with a CE. :?

I'd also consider changing my name to Estuardo if I decide to become a full on Ellis Islander a lo Peruano, as no-one from socio-economic level C downwards can remember my name past 2 seconds.
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Postby naturegirl » Mon Sep 07, 2009 2:06 pm

stuart wrote:I wanted to do want American In Lima suggested and on my CE application put my mothers maiden name as my apellido materno so I could have two last names. Unfortunately, they said I couldn't, that the CE has to be exactly the same as the passport.

If I do get my DNI, I'd like to have my apellido materno on it, yet not have my apellido materno as my surname in the UK (as my fathers surname is rare and has to be preserved.) We'll see.

DOn't worry, YOu CAN?T put your mother's last name on your CE UNLESS it's on your passport. However, when you become Peuvian, they'll simply add your mother's last name to your father's name and you'll get two.
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Postby american_in_lima » Tue Sep 08, 2009 9:43 am

naturegirl wrote:
stuart wrote:I wanted to do want American In Lima suggested and on my CE application put my mothers maiden name as my apellido materno so I could have two last names. Unfortunately, they said I couldn't, that the CE has to be exactly the same as the passport.

If I do get my DNI, I'd like to have my apellido materno on it, yet not have my apellido materno as my surname in the UK (as my fathers surname is rare and has to be preserved.) We'll see.

DOn't worry, YOu CAN?T put your mother's last name on your CE UNLESS it's on your passport. However, when you become Peuvian, they'll simply add your mother's last name to your father's name and you'll get two.


Stuart - I will let you know how it goes for me when I do my DNI. Would be great to have my my mom's last name on there. To be honest, since it is Italian, its an easy name to pronounce than my Irish last name from my father's side. Stuart - if you need any help on the papers, let me know as well. - George -
Regards,

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Postby stuart » Tue Sep 08, 2009 9:59 am

american_in_lima wrote:
naturegirl wrote:
stuart wrote:I wanted to do want American In Lima suggested and on my CE application put my mothers maiden name as my apellido materno so I could have two last names. Unfortunately, they said I couldn't, that the CE has to be exactly the same as the passport.

If I do get my DNI, I'd like to have my apellido materno on it, yet not have my apellido materno as my surname in the UK (as my fathers surname is rare and has to be preserved.) We'll see.

DOn't worry, YOu CAN?T put your mother's last name on your CE UNLESS it's on your passport. However, when you become Peuvian, they'll simply add your mother's last name to your father's name and you'll get two.


Stuart - I will let you know how it goes for me when I do my DNI. Would be great to have my my mom's last name on there. To be honest, since it is Italian, its an easy name to pronounce than my Irish last name from my father's side. Stuart - if you need any help on the papers, let me know as well. - George -


Thanks George, I'll let you know when the time comes.
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Postby LauraMH » Wed Sep 09, 2009 11:14 pm

naturegirl wrote:Laura, those names aren-t my real names. BUt yes, in the US, I am now Sharon Smith de Jimenez. But honestly, for the US, you can do whatever you want. Keep it, change it, etc.

As for the Peruvian law_ NO IDEA. NOthing seems to make sense.

In the US: Sharon Smith de Jimenez
In Peru> Sharon Smith Doe de Jimenez

american_in_lima wrote:Concerning the name: Your exact Peruvian identity will be exactly written by what is written on your Carnet de Extranjeria. From the carnet, when you become Peruvian, they copy the information from your carnet and that information is what they must use when they register you as a Peruvian.


American in LIma, Again, sorry. I disagree. My CE said Sharon Smith de Jimenez, when I got my naturalisation cert, they had added my mother-s name. I went to talk to all the people in the immigration office and they said that-s just the way things are. If it-s different for you, I really don-t know what to say, except maybe rules are different for men and women. My mother-s maiden name hasn-t been used by her nor I in the past 30 yeasr. Wasn-t on my CE, they simply took it from my birth certificate, without asking. As for it being the info that they MUST use, maybe in theory, but in practice, speaking from experience, it-s NOT what they did.


Hey Sharon, Thanks. Yea, I realize those were just generic names. I was just trying to figure out what you were legally, with the example. Sorry to confuse it. It seems that things happen like this...one thing for one person and something else for another.

What I don't understand is that I am now in the CE process. How do I know what they will use? I don't think I ever used my mother's maiden name and I didn't give a copy of my birth certificate. Just the wedding certificate. Since I'm not totally done, maybe there is another form I'll have to fill out. I don't know, but it sure is confusing and frustrating that it's different for different people. So, I am curious as to how to proceed. I guess there is no option but to do it and see. I just hope to avoid having my mother's maiden name on anything. As you say even she doesn't use it. She's been married 40 years. We'll see. Thanks
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Postby naturegirl » Thu Sep 10, 2009 9:41 am

You CAN?T use your mother's maiden name on your CE. Whatever is on your passport (which is your legal name) will be put on your CE. If you change your passport and want to change your CE as well you willl have to 1. Pay for the change
2. Pay for a new CE.

They won't change your name until you become Peruvian.
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Postby LauraMH » Thu Sep 10, 2009 10:06 am

naturegirl wrote:You CAN?T use your mother's maiden name on your CE. Whatever is on your passport (which is your legal name) will be put on your CE. If you change your passport and want to change your CE as well you willl have to 1. Pay for the change
2. Pay for a new CE.

They won't change your name until you become Peruvian.


Got it. Thanks. my passport just has my first middle and father's last name. So at least I know what it will be and the de husband's last name is only if you legally change your passport to that? So much easier after the first time to do all this. Learn as you go.

So in a couple of years if I want to apply for citizenship that is when I will have to add my mother's maiden name?

Patience.
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Postby american_in_lima » Thu Sep 10, 2009 7:43 pm

Laura - No need to legally change your American Passport. You are better off keeping all of your US documents as is. There won't be a problem.

Her name in Peru was for example: Ana Maria Vega Toledo de Wilson

And in the states, legally her name was: Ana Wilson

In 10 years, never had one problem.

I didn't use the real names here obviously, but you get the idea.
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Postby naturegirl » Thu Sep 10, 2009 9:51 pm

LauraMH wrote:Got it. Thanks. my passport just has my first middle and father's last name. So at least I know what it will be and the de husband's last name is only if you legally change your passport to that? So much easier after the first time to do all this. Learn as you go.

So in a couple of years if I want to apply for citizenship that is when I will have to add my mother's maiden name?

Patience.


You don't have to put the "de" on your American passport, you can keep your maiden name, add the "de" or add your husband's. funny thing is that in the US, they're not used to the "de" so when I tried to change credit cards, and my license, they wanted to take it off :shock:

Yes, you add your mother's maiden name when you get citizenship, in Peru
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Postby kopite » Sat Sep 12, 2009 9:43 pm

What is it about being a US citizen that you are most proud of?

I really would like to know what makes the US citizen feel proud of anything.
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Postby naturegirl » Sun Sep 13, 2009 12:20 am

kopite wrote:What is it about being a US citizen that you are most proud of?

I really would like to know what makes the US citizen feel proud of anything.


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many things, but not enough

Postby hopeadder » Sun Sep 13, 2009 4:52 pm

Many things about being a U.S. citizen are great, Kopite. You seem to hate too much.

1. The best hospitals in the world are in the U.S. yes expensive especially without insurance, but the richest people in the world go to the U.S. for cancer treatment, brain and nervous system diseases, and many other things.

2. It's not perfect, but the education, especially secondary degrees are very well respected around the world.

3. earning potential and travel ease is better than in most other countries


Overall there are many good things about the U.S. and many things are great about being a citizen there, thats why people move there. I don't like many of the horrible things that happen there (and around the developed world) so I am chosing to persue moving away. To Peru.

And by the way, I am a Texan before I am an American.
And George Bush and his whole family are NOT Texan, never have and never will be in my eyes.

But to go back to the thread, I want to move to Peru because i am afraid of what may happen in the USA, and look at Peru as a place with a great potential to live, work, help others, and enjoy life altogether.
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Postby cajun jamie » Sun Sep 13, 2009 5:50 pm

kopite wrote:What is it about being a US citizen that you are most proud of?

I really would like to know what makes the US citizen feel proud of anything.


That is a pretty negative statement. Not very thought out. Everyone has something to be proud of from where they come.

These are also pretty harsh statements:
Many things about being a U.S. citizen are great, Kopite. You seem to hate too much.

1. The best hospitals in the world are in the U.S. yes expensive especially without insurance, but the richest people in the world go to the U.S. for cancer treatment, brain and nervous system diseases, and many other things.

2. It's not perfect, but the education, especially secondary degrees are very well respected around the world.

3. earning potential and travel ease is better than in most other countries


Overall there are many good things about the U.S. and many things are great about being a citizen there, thats why people move there. I don't like many of the horrible things that happen there (and around the developed world) so I am chosing to persue moving away. To Peru.

And by the way, I am a Texan before I am an American.
And George Bush and his whole family are NOT Texan, never have and never will be in my eyes.

But to go back to the thread, I want to move to Peru because i am afraid of what may happen in the USA, and look at Peru as a place with a great potential to live, work, help others, and enjoy life altogether.


My experience has shown people move to another place for two main reasons: 1) Opportunity that does not exist where they are. 2) To move to something better or away from something worse.

One statement that I have heard over and over is that the US (my country) has the best health care system in the world because the richest people from around the world go there.

OK, then let's focus on "best." If you are not one of the richest people in the world, then you won't get the same care. "Best" in my definition would be the"highest quality of care shared among the vastest majority of people per capita." In simple terms, the best health care would be a country where most everyone receives the same, high quality healthcare, regardless of income or class. Doesn't happen in the US, which is why millions of Americans each year venture to India for equal quality heart care, to Mexico and Latin America for other procedures.

One thing I do like a lot about America - I can leave my keys and wallet in my car, at night, with the windows down. I can leave my house unlocked and windows open. That was a plus.

Regarding Peru, it's a lot more free here, with respect to one can live anonymously for all accounts and purposes and not have to run the rat race every day here, just to keep up.

But, being an Eisenhower Republican who moved here from Texas, if one thing would bring me back to the US, it is Obama. I am relieved that the US finally has a President as great as him.
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Postby Rene » Sun Sep 13, 2009 6:11 pm

cajun jamie wrote:One thing I do like a lot about America - I can leave my keys and wallet in my car, at night, with the windows down. I can leave my house unlocked and windows open. That was a plus.

I don't know where you're from in the US and how long ago that was, but that is certainly not the case everywhere in the US. In northern New Jersey for example they like to take the whole car with all your posessions in it...
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Postby Alpineprince » Sun Sep 13, 2009 6:59 pm

kopite wrote:What is it about being a US citizen that you are most proud of?


1.Pizza (from Brooklyn)
2. Soprano's (season 1&2)
3. 2 buck chuck
4. Neil Young
5. True Blood (Americas next best selling "soft drink" and a great series so far!
France has the best health care system.
Thailand has the worlds best hospital!
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Postby hopeadder » Sun Sep 13, 2009 7:00 pm

Cajun Jamie wrote:
These are also pretty harsh statements:


I dont see any of my statements as harsh or negative, except those that Deny Bush as being a Texan...truth

Also, I agree that the "health care system" is not the best in the USA, but I specifically stated best hospitals, not best health care bud. Its too bad that everyone cannot afford the same health care, but MOST places where health care is available equally for everyone have much higher income taxes ( ranging close to 50% in some EU countries) and there are long waiting lines for basic care.
It's pick your poison around the world with healthcare...Millions of people go to the USA for healthcare and many Americans go elsewhere for theirs (although I doubt it's millions)....

cajun jamie wrote:
One thing I do like a lot about America - I can leave my keys and wallet in my car, at night, with the windows down. I can leave my house unlocked and windows open. That was a plus.


I don't know where you're from in the US and how long ago that was, but that is certainly not the case everywhere in the US. In northern New Jersey for example they like to take the whole car with all your posessions in it...

HAHAHAH yep
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Postby anuta » Sun Sep 13, 2009 9:23 pm

kopite wrote:What is it about being a US citizen that you are most proud of?

I really would like to know what makes the US citizen feel proud of anything.


It doesn't look like you want to know what makes the US citizens proud, it looks like you just want to show your disdain.

There are plenty of things a US citizen can be prouf of and I'm saying that as a Canadian.

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