My turn to get robbed

Answers to your qestions about moving to, and living in, Peru,
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Chiclayo gringo
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My turn to get robbed

Postby Chiclayo gringo » Tue Jan 19, 2010 4:34 pm

I was stooped down with one foot inside the combi when my wife shouted out “Your camera!” I carry (now I need to say carried) my camera in a case on my belt. I’ve done that for two years. There were two of them. One cut the belt loop and was running before I even knew what happened. I chased after them but had no chance of catching them. I was shouting “robbers” at the top of my lungs but of the many people in the area – this was 3:00pm in the afternoon, just one hour ago, no one even attempted to help.

What bothers me is that we saw the two guys walk past the combi stop twice. My wife said they were looking us over. Where I went wrong was thinking I was safe entering the combi. At least I learned that lesson. Nowhere is safe in this country.

Tom


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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby Kelly » Tue Jan 19, 2010 4:36 pm

Sorry this happened to you, Tom :( Pretty brazen of them, especially since your wife had already spotted them.
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby anuta » Tue Jan 19, 2010 4:54 pm

Sorry to hear about that. I guess my turn is coming soon, I've been here too long without any problem :shock:.
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby mammalu » Tue Jan 19, 2010 5:28 pm

Tom, sorry about your camera! Besides de indignation you must feel, we know how much you enjoy documenting your Blog.

Guess, we all have to be more careful, as we are travelling to Peru in a couple of weeks, it is time to leave our comfort zone and be more alert. :(
Stand with anybody that stands RIGHT. Stand with him while he is right and PART with him when he goes wrong." ! Abraham Lincoln
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby Chiclayo gringo » Tue Jan 19, 2010 6:04 pm

I’ve been pacing the floor for the past 2 hours. It’s a lot more than indignation. I can’t let go of the anger. All I’ve got is ‘ifs’. IF the guy had fumbled while cutting the strap. IF he had stumbled while running from me. IF I had a warning one second sooner, I could have pivoted and caught him. He’s my height but can’t be more than 120 pounds. It would have been no contest. The other guy was so puny as to be a non event. I’ve got another camera. What I need is to figure out how to sleep tonight.
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby Dil » Tue Jan 19, 2010 6:16 pm

Sorry for what happened, dude. The lesson to be learned is hope for the best, plan for the worst. Everything that's of value should be out of sight and well hidden (hand bags, wallets, watches, rings, cell phones, cameras etc.). Sometimes we tend to forget that lesson, because we've had no problems so far, but the piranhas are always out there and next time they might be armed.
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby mahou123 » Tue Jan 19, 2010 7:54 pm

Sorry to hear that, Tom. Hope you´ll manage to get some sleep tonight. It seems that sooner or later it happens to everybody here.
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby mammalu » Tue Jan 19, 2010 9:09 pm

It is so bad to feel impotent or feel invaded. In no way, shape or form should the victim feel it was her/his fault. It is a disgrace , but in Peru you have to live and develop a suitable level of paranoia; enough to make you and your loved ones be safe.

I will add that we are grateful Chiclayo Gringo, as many others who have been lately victims of different sorts of crime, is OK and was not hurt (many wives will agree with me) .
Stand with anybody that stands RIGHT. Stand with him while he is right and PART with him when he goes wrong." ! Abraham Lincoln
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby calygirl » Tue Jan 19, 2010 10:26 pm

sorry to say, but the the seniors in Peru do not have the advantage, unless with family, especially if they appear to be gringo or gringa. My husband, who is born and raised in Peru, and myself, totally gringa, are seniors. We never go out to places like Gamarra or centro Lima, without my nephew who is 40 who we call our "bodyguard". I have been robbed going to the airport when someone broke out the back window of our cab and stole my money and passport (and totally ruined my trip to Buenos Aires) and also had my camera stolen at Starbucks in San Isidro while my husband was sitting at the table.
If you at all appear weak, older, or distracted (and especially distracted) wherever (and this part is important) in the world you might be, you are a target. You have a bullseye on your chest.
Let it go, it's only a stupid camera....use this as a life lesson and thank God you are okay.
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby Chiclayo gringo » Tue Jan 19, 2010 11:27 pm

Okay…it’s 11:25pm and I’ve finally been able to relax a bit. After 3 hours of listening to me pace and loudly questioning my own stupidity and the ancestry of the punks who robbed me, my wife grabbed my NFL football and me and demanded that we go outside and throw the ball around. We threw for about an hour and I could feel the tension leave me.

I don’t want to beat this incident to death – after all it was only a camera that was taken. Others have had much worse happen to them. But maybe someone will learn something from my mistakes.

Logically I’ve decided I made four mistakes. The first was assuming that when I made eye contact with the punks on their second trip past us, it would have scared them off. That has always worked for me in the past. This time it didn’t and I didn’t check to see if they had gone. My second mistake was assuming the danger was past when I was half way in the combi. Obviously the thief was waiting for that exact moment when I was in a defenseless position. Thirdly, I didn’t think there was any way in the world to tear or cut that strap on my camera case without me feeling it. I always thought if it happened I would know it and have time to react. Now I know better, and need to find a way to carry my remaining camera safely. The fourth mistake was chasing these guys off the main street and down a grungy dirt street. My wife was screaming behind me that they were leading me into a trap and would take my watch and glasses but I was too angry to listen. I only stopped running when I was out of breath. In retrospect she was right.

Another lesson I already knew but that was reinforced is NEVER… repeat… NEVER expect help from anyone in that kind of situation no matter how many people are present. It ain’t gonna happen.

My thanks to those who have posted on this thread.

Tom
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby stuart » Wed Jan 20, 2010 1:00 am

mammalu wrote: It is a disgrace , but in Peru you have to live and develop a suitable level of paranoia; enough to make you and your loved ones be safe.


I think it is very important to realise that this type of thing has very little to do with Peru. I assume most people in this forum are of at least middle-class backgrounds and have had the grace and fortune to have always lived in what are vaguely called "good neighbourhoods". I wouldn't be caught dead (or perhaps I literally would be) with a camera clipped on to my belt in certain parts of my "back home". I wouldn't have it very long, and rather than it being snatched, it's more likely it would be taken from me forcefully and violently with extra kicks and punches thrown in just for fun - a type of thug culture that doesn't exist in Peru where crime is generally committed out of semi-desperation (I say semi because people don't starve in Peru, so crime is merely an immoral short cut to easier life, the equivalent to me robbing a small business to pay my rent).
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby KenBE » Wed Jan 20, 2010 12:35 pm

stuart wrote:
mammalu wrote: It is a disgrace , but in Peru you have to live and develop a suitable level of paranoia; enough to make you and your loved ones be safe.



I think it is very important to realise that this type of thing has very little to do with Peru.


Ummm, yes it does.... In my four years in Peru I have seen more crimes committed than in my whole life in Belgium...
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby stuart » Wed Jan 20, 2010 12:47 pm

KenBE wrote:
stuart wrote:
mammalu wrote: It is a disgrace , but in Peru you have to live and develop a suitable level of paranoia; enough to make you and your loved ones be safe.



I think it is very important to realise that this type of thing has very little to do with Peru.


Ummm, yes it does.... In my four years in Peru I have seen more crimes committed than in my whole life in Belgium...


What a delightful country that must be. Your government should help manage the crime-ridden inner-cities of other developed nations. It would be nice to rid large western cities of "no go" areas.
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby KenBE » Wed Jan 20, 2010 1:15 pm

What a delightful country that must be. Your government should help manage the crime-ridden inner-cities of other developed nations. It would be nice to rid large western cities of "no go" areas.

Look, of course crime happens everywhere and every major city has areas that are not safe. The difference is that Peru has a lot more of them, at least compared to what I am used to. I am not saying my country is a paradise (it is not) and I still love Peru, I am just telling you what I (and lots of others on this forum it seems) have experienced..
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby stuart » Wed Jan 20, 2010 1:34 pm

KenBE wrote:
What a delightful country that must be. Your government should help manage the crime-ridden inner-cities of other developed nations. It would be nice to rid large western cities of "no go" areas.

Look, of course crime happens everywhere and every major city has areas that are not safe. The difference is that Peru has a lot more of them, at least compared to what I am used to. I am not saying my country is a paradise (it is not) and I still love Peru, I am just telling you what I (and lots of others on this forum it seems) have experienced..


Agreed. 90% of the districts that make up Peruvian cities (I emphasise cities, rather than "Peru") are the same as most western inner-cities, and the fancy middle-class districts are so small in comparison that it is easy for those criminals who live in the other 90% to venture into the 10% for rich pickings. That makes things much worse.

On the other hand, I did clearly qualify my previous statement with a "what you are used to" clause. I said most people here are not from the Barracones or El Agustino of their countries and of course experienced less crime where they were from. But I'd hazard a guess that a Pituca who never left her family compound without her driver-bodyguard would find downtown "X" city in "Y" developed country downright awful and want to return to crime-free safe and comfortable Peru. If on the other hand, you/me/others/whoever had ample experience with the Barracones or El Agustino of their own home country, Lima and Peru would be either no different and perhaps better. This is all I said. :(
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby euroman » Wed Jan 20, 2010 1:44 pm

It´s always better to carry expensive items out of sight. For you it might be a camera, but for a lot of people, it's a fortune. And many people are struggling to survive. I don´t know the price of your camera but you wouldn´t be walking around with the same amount of money as the price of your camera sticking out of your belt.

Recently, I had a broken flower vase lying in the garden of my house. I was about to throw it away...somebody came up to me and asked if he can have it. He wanted to glue it and then sell it.
There´s no trash in Peru. Everything is a fortune. Look at the people who go to the trashcans every night, looking for things to recycle.
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby iron butterfly » Wed Jan 20, 2010 1:52 pm

"My Turn To Get Robbed"? Is that the mind set for Peru? Waiting for turns?
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby NelsonSuarez » Wed Jan 20, 2010 2:20 pm

Our "encargado" told me about an interesting conversation he overheard on the micro on his way to work two days ago: two "chorros," about 25 yrs old each, complaining how difficult kidnapping and extortion had gotten in Lima, and that it was much easier and less trouble to go for targets in the provinces or outskirts of lima..

[now this was a few days after a friend got held at gun point mid day in posh san isidro..]
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby mahou123 » Wed Jan 20, 2010 4:24 pm

Unfortunately, high levels of crime is the other side of liberty Peruvians enjoy. It is basically ok to do something like that, not punished by law. If you snatch somebody´s camera and get caught, police will let you go. I read in El Comercio last weekend that prisons have about double the capacity numbers on average, some triple. There is no where to keep arrested people. And some of such people probably wouldn´t mind to be in prison anyway, get free food there.

I think the saftey will become the main political issue for the next elections. Whoever manages to convince the people that they will conduct a major crackdown on crime, will get elected. If would require some ´heavy handed measures´ and ´human rights violations´, so current government seemingly doesn´t want to do it.
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby Chiclayo gringo » Wed Jan 20, 2010 5:18 pm

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Tom
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby american_in_lima » Wed Jan 20, 2010 5:54 pm

Sorry to hear your story. It could have been worse.

In the three years I have been here:

My office was broken into where I lost a lot of laptops that we needed to run the business. .Not only did I not have them, I had to buy more computers to continue running my business. Location: MIraflores - Right off of Larco.

My car was broken into where they essentially wiped out the whole inside of the car...They left me the seats and steering wheel..Everything else, gone. Its looks like a normal car and then you open the doors and you say....."Wow"....When it happened to me, I actually was so disturbed by the job they did on me, I started to laugh...That was how I coped with it. Location: Miraflores.

In November of 2009, I lost a mini-laptop inside of my own house. One day I had it at my house, another day after a large party at my house, it was missing. Location: Miraflores

It´s part of life as I see it. These things happen everywhere in the world.

More than the stuff, you feel violated as a human being. It also takes away your faith in the good of people. I try to trust, but am definitely more paranoid about my stuff than before.

I always look at it the positive way....It could have been much worse...and in fact, for many, it is much worse. The main thing is that you weren´t hurt...Next time, it won´t happen to you as you will look at the world a little different with a much more cautious eye.
Regards,

George
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby iron butterfly » Wed Jan 20, 2010 6:05 pm

I"m a little slow sometimes so bare with me. Was this all a joke? Beginning with a guy, somehow, cutting a camera from a belt (so as to win our sympathy) just to arrive at the punch line of "blow up a thief"? If so, good job you certainly got me.
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby Chiclayo gringo » Wed Jan 20, 2010 7:07 pm

iron butterfly wrote:I"m a little slow sometimes so bare with me. Was this all a joke? Beginning with a guy, somehow, cutting a camera from a belt (so as to win our sympathy) just to arrive at the punch line of "blow up a thief"? If so, good job you certainly got me.


THUMP – THUMP – THUMP… the sound of me banging my head against the wall. ARGhhhhhhh!!

No…it is not a joke. The satirical humor I employed in post no. 20 (I wish the posts were numbered) is an expression of cynicism toward the very real incident I experienced and the rampant crime in this jungle we live in. And once again I find myself needing to explain my humor. Perhaps I’m the slow one.

Tom
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby inscop » Wed Jan 20, 2010 8:22 pm

I have no sympathy for thieves. If a BUAC really existed, I would be the first in line to buy such an item. Just try to not blow up any innocent bystanders when you push the button.

Tom, next time I am down there, I will teach you a surefire way to disarm a pistol-toting dirt bag. I taught Rose and she is really good at it. Matter of fact, if it ever happens to us, imagine the crook's surprise when this tiny little woman rips the gun out of his hands.

I know, I'm a little bit hardcore. If one happens to be a criminal lover and you don't want these scum to get hurt, put my posts on "ignore." Arguing about it is futile. I am not going to change anyone's mind and they certainly are not going to change mine. Being a retired law enforcement officer, I have lived by the following my entire adult life:

Be polite. Be professional. But, have a plan to kill everyone you meet.

Tom, glad you came out of this unscathed. I was getting ready to delete all this stuff and say something very generic. Then I thought, "Nah, this is how I really feel."
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby cafeandino » Wed Jan 20, 2010 9:49 pm

Whenever you put a few expats together, it's inevitable that one or two will defend criminals and the disgusting and "sin verguenza" system that supports them in their crime.
Is it REALLY a topic of debate that judges and fiscales - and their descisions - can be bought?
Is it REALLY a topic of debate that police are so underpaid and untrained and poorly led that they are themselves are a contributing factor of crime in Peru?

Every day that we choose to live in Peru, we accept that crime is a part of life here, and we stay and run our businesses and raise our families and we deal with it. It's not a great situation, but if any of us don't like it -we can leave, right? We accept the bad with the good. And Peru, like anywhere, has it's share of both.

Making excuses for the criminals is completely irresponsible and naive (hey, crime happens everywhere!)
Blame the victims? NEVER! (well, forgive me for saying so, but why did you have that camera out in the open?)

Build 10 more prisons, and you could fill them by the end of this year if the laws that exist were actually applied. But hey, we all know that is not going to happen. Be aware, be deliberate in your actions, and dont become too attached to your possesions. As has already been mentioned, your safety and the safety of your loved ones is paramount - nothing else even comes close.

Sorry for your experience, Tom. I've been there, and it sucks. - Chris
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby Tito » Thu Jan 21, 2010 7:38 am

Tom - From a Peruano living in Kansas, I am sorry this incident happened to you. I have vacationed in Peru and have been warmed by my family not to wear or display any valuable items. I remember going to the changing of the guards in Lima and did not wear my watch or any jewelry. As much as I wanted to take pictures I did not even have a camera. It is unfortunate however, one has to realize that Peru is considered a third world country and robbery is spiking upwards.
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby mammalu » Thu Jan 21, 2010 10:05 am

Where can I buy a few BUAC's? :D You made me laugh with your infomercial, Tom.
A little bit of humor for a tough situation.

I read posts with a grain of salt and try to understand the reasoning behind the posters. It helps to see where they are coming from. I come from the premise that my Peru, Lima the city where I grew up, lowered the bar regarding crime or petty theft. I couldn't care less how many comparisons are made regarding how dangerous are other cities. Or, if you post/complain, then you are from an isolated class of privileged, 'pituca' LOL middle class. I have to laugh at this remark, considering I lived years ago in Jackson Heights in NY (for those who are familiar with the area) while stretching my budget, in order to survive. When I was a teenager, we volunteered FOR YEARS (not weeks) alphabetizing adults in Villa El Salvador and assisting during the weekends at children pavillions in a Hospital in el Callao. Lima was much safer then.

People, I was not born at the turn of the century (even though I enjoy Ricardo Palma's writings). Lima was not like that. We, as teenagers were able to walk around downtown Lima, buy in Monterrey, Tia Stores; go to the beach, wear discreet jewelry around our neighborhoods, walk and walk and walk anywhere with the possibilities of being mugged/assaulted or kidnapped being null. There is phrase in Peruvian spanish: Males de muchos, consuelo de Tontos. I refuse to accept the situation is OK....because it could be worse!

I love Peru, and thank God I am Peruvian to say what I say. Otherwise I would have been told, 'if you don't like it, leave! Humm. I have enough family, business and real estate ties to say, I still plannig my semi-retirement in Peru; but I refuse to ignore what is bad. There is nothing wrong with criticism if we want the system to change for the better. On the other hand, I am against demeaning and non constructive comments and comtempt; as this is a third-world country anyway and you must learn to love Peru with all its imperfections. But, I still refuse to accept the crime that is taking the city downhill, further and worse. :evil:
Stand with anybody that stands RIGHT. Stand with him while he is right and PART with him when he goes wrong." ! Abraham Lincoln
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby stuart » Thu Jan 21, 2010 11:06 am

mammalu wrote:I read posts with a grain of salt and try to understand the reasoning behind the posters. It helps to see where they are coming from. I come from the premise that my Peru, Lima the city where I grew up, lowered the bar regarding crime or petty theft.


Yes it has, as have many other cities. It's a cultural thing - ask any criminal if he feels remorse or guilt for his crimes and he would laugh at you as if you were some kind of freak. Before criminals were fewer and had limits. I saw a documentary on gangs in LA, and this old gang guy in jail was complaining that the young gang members of today don't get it, that in his day there was "honor" and "morality", that you can't just car-jack someone then shoot them in the head for fun, or pump bullets into crowds of women of children. Other criminals like him say that in there day they would have been torn apart in jail for that.

I couldn't care less how many comparisons are made regarding how dangerous are other cities.

I could, because that was my sub-point to the broader subject and I consider my views to have relevance. Lima is a dangerous city, but I say that it is no more dangerous than the worst parts of cities in developed countries and is actually safer than many other 3rd world cities.

Or, if you post/complain, then you are from an isolated class of privileged, 'pituca' LOL middle class.

I can only assume that is directed to me, as I am the only one who made the point that the middle classes from relatively crime-free areas would notice and feel the crime more in Lima than those from rougher areas. I really don't appreciate the mis-quote, it's quite offensive.

I have to laugh at this remark, considering I lived years ago in Jackson Heights in NY (for those who are familiar with the area) while stretching my budget, in order to survive.

I understand the area has seen investment and redevelopment, but I put it to you that if you were taking photos in a rough area today you would loose your camera...

When I was a teenager, we volunteered FOR YEARS (not weeks) alphabetizing adults in Villa El Salvador and assisting during the weekends at children pavillions in a Hospital in el Callao. Lima was much safer then.


Yes it was safer. My city was safer too apparently, I think everyone would say the same. There is a something happening that I can't explain, with crime getting worse and criminals loosing all form of humanity.

People, I was not born at the turn of the century (even though I enjoy Ricardo Palma's writings). Lima was not like that. We, as teenagers were able to walk around downtown Lima, buy in Monterrey, Tia Stores; go to the beach, wear discreet jewelry around our neighborhoods, walk and walk and walk anywhere with the possibilities of being mugged/assaulted or kidnapped being null.


I do just that today and have never once had a problem... but with one hand on my valuables and always having to watch who's watching me... just like home.
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby antonio » Fri Jan 22, 2010 2:28 am

It's always a very bad experience to get robbed, but I think that it's 10 times worse when you are a foreigner in a country that is not yours. You don't really know what to do, who to ask for help, etc.. and when the system is not working well (policemen, judges, jails, etc) someones feels definitely more vulnerable

I have never been robbed in Lima, probably because I always maintain a low profile about my belongings and never show it to thieves. Usually the street scums are always waiting for the "opportunity" to rob. They are looking for someone who looks like an easy target to attack.

I will try to be positive about robberies in Peru, and in most of the cases petty crimes are almost always with no injury involved to the victim (comparing to some others big cities in South AMerica), so I strongly recommend not to fight back when someone rob something with low monetary value from you as a camera, cellphone, etc.

In the political arena in Peru, nobody of the actual candidates and/or people who direct the country are brave enough to fight against criminals, probably because in a country as Peru to really fight and stop crimes it's inevitable to break some international laws as "human rights". I really hope that in the future, the world rethink the actual wrong concept of "human rights". I think it should be strongly diferenciated between the good and bad citizens of a country, it means criminals should lose it rights once make robberies, rapes, etc.

I do recommend to anyone who pretend to live in Peru, not to be so connected to your belongings. I am trying to explain it with a language that is not mine, but when someone in Peru is robbed (example a cellphone), and after the shock has passed, the people use to say "ya fue", it means something as "let it go away and don't blacken your life with the bad moment, think positive"
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby LauraMH » Sat Jan 23, 2010 11:34 am

Seems this has generated quite the interest. Never know what will be a hot topic here.

Reading these comments really reinforces my reluctance to move to Lima from a small town in the Provinces. I know a small amount happens here and family and friends always tell me to be careful, but I don't carry much of value to attract attention other than my light hair, blue eyes and light skin in a town with few "foreigners".

The one experience I had with robbery happened in Arequipa last year near the Plaza de las Armas.

I had a fabric bag I got in guatemala with a zipper. Inside was a small safepac bag that I bought when I was here as a tourist. However inside the safebag was my passport and my husbands that I just picked up for him that morning. Also a windbreaker and other things. It was a buglging a bit.

Anyway, I crossed a street and made the fatal mistake of shifting the bag a little more behind me than infront as it was annoying. Anyway, as I crossed and looked down the street for traffic I noticed a guy behind me and made eye contact, but didn't think anything of it. Then, about 40 seconds later I felt a slight something. I looked down at my bag and it was unzipped and the inside bag was gone. I quickly turned around and they guy had it in his hands. He wasn't running or anything. I yelled hey that's mine! and I grabbed it out of his hands. He said that it fell out and he was picking it up...whatever. then he ran off. when i realized what happened I yelled thief and turned to my other side to see a security door standing in front of the store.....of course he saw nothing.

I can't believe I got it back. It had over $100 and passports and who knows what else. In the moment I was pissed and confident then the adrenaline passed and I thought about it all. I was lucky on many levels. It was the middle of the day with a lot of people around. I know better than not to carry my bag in front of me....just takes once.
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby antonio » Sat Jan 23, 2010 10:47 pm

LauraMH wrote:I can't believe I got it back. It had over $100 and passports and who knows what else. In the moment I was pissed and confident then the adrenaline passed and I thought about it all. I was lucky on many levels. It was the middle of the day with a lot of people around. I know better than not to carry my bag in front of me....just takes once.


You are a very lucky woman ... are you the gringa version of Kina Malpartida ? :D
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby sanbartoloian » Sun Jan 24, 2010 10:14 am

We need a telethon! We have to raise funds for Peruvians to either get a set of balls or some consience to help someone being robbed. I am amazed that people just ignore plees for help. As long as the public ingores brothers and sisters in trouble than I hate to say that your right, but everyone will get a turn. For those who ignore crys for help, I say ....em and feedem fish heads.

I know about crime. I am involved in gang intervention and I often carry two guns rather than one on the street. I also know what a concerned community can do to curb crime if not stop it. These thieves have partners in crime and that is the apathetic attitude of those around.
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby trueno » Sun Jan 24, 2010 10:33 pm

i have been comming to peru for 5 years, had a laptop taken from my apartment, but i look at it as my fault for trusting, when i go on the street with a camara i buy a throw away cam,, let them take it, always dress down and don't carrry important papers as my identifcation card, i have a copy of my passport and had it notarized, never had a problem showing it and being accepted,, I enjoy being in Peru,, but have learned to take care, be alert, doesn't mean i won't be robbed, but sure is less chance of it,,
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby tupacperu » Mon Jan 25, 2010 11:06 am

I have never been robbed in Lima, probably because I always maintain a low profile about my belongings and never show it to thieves. Usually the street scums are always waiting for the "opportunity" to rob. They are looking for someone who looks like an easy target to attack.

I will try to be positive about robberies in Peru, and in most of the cases petty crimes are almost always with no injury involved to the victim (comparing to some others big cities in South AMerica), so I strongly recommend not to fight back when someone rob something with low monetary value from you as a camera, cellphone, etc.


Pretty much the same here. 7 years in Peru and not been personally robbed (street). Had my business (cabina) robbed of PCs , but found out it was an inside job (brother-in-law and friends). Had things stolen from my home (family again).

Many of us may have comes from middle class areas in the USA, but in the ghettos or barrios of the USA it comes with the territory. Just got back from Chiclayo and crime there is a little out of control. I was in a taxi (chiclayo), the drive commented "nice watch". I said "$10.00, you want it you can have it". He was a little embarassed and did not speak anymore during the trip.

My personal style: I do not smile while walking the street in Peru, always aware of my surrounding, never distracted. When someone stares me down, I stare them down with a crazy look on my face. I guess that comes from some of the rough neighborhoods I use to cruise as a young man. I learned from experience. Even in the USA, I carry a credit card billfold 2 sides with an ATM card and my carnet, $10.00 watch, I do not own a car, I have a small pocket size digital camera at times.
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby sonia » Mon Jan 25, 2010 1:29 pm

Tupacperu, Being robbed of computers by a brother-in-law would enrage me! Being robbed in my own house by family members would also! What awful experiences! What did you do?
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby susita83 » Mon Jan 25, 2010 1:40 pm

My husband had that happen to him once. His brother owns a business and he used to work for him as a manager & one of their nephews robbed the factory. There wasn't much they could do, they got the stuff back & fired the nephew.

I know how he feels though I have an uncle with a drug problem and we've had things disappear when he was around as well. It stinks.
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby mammalu » Mon Jan 25, 2010 1:44 pm

I was disappointed when I read that American in Lima had his laptop stolen after a party at his house. Wow, among friends. Now Tupac, handling that within the family, that is beyond dsappointing. What do you do then? :roll:

Also, Victims of crimes shouldn't think it is their fault. It is not.
Stand with anybody that stands RIGHT. Stand with him while he is right and PART with him when he goes wrong." ! Abraham Lincoln
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby mahou123 » Mon Jan 25, 2010 2:21 pm

sanbartoloian wrote:I know about crime. I am involved in gang intervention and I often carry two guns rather than one on the street. I also know what a concerned community can do to curb crime if not stop it. These thieves have partners in crime and that is the apathetic attitude of those around.


Yeah, two guns are better than one. So I guess when you see a cholo running away with somebody´s camera, you pull one of them out, or both, put a few bullets into *****, then hand a camera back to the grateful victim. Maybe just need to clean it from blood a little bit.

Why don´t you move up to Chiclayo, it´s sunny and nice all year around, and there are plenty of people you can shoot. We need some real cowboys here. But please bring lots of ammunition! :wink:
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby pwr144 » Mon Jan 25, 2010 7:34 pm

What about personal security items? What can you carry on your person?

Is a small telescoping baton permissible?
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby antonio » Mon Jan 25, 2010 8:02 pm

pwr144 wrote:What about personal security items? What can you carry on your person?

Is a small telescoping baton permissible?


In Peru any personal defense object is alllowed, except for guns where you need a permit. it means you can carry a high voltage stun gun, a pepper spray, etc. I don't use any of those devices, because I think one of the best defense is prevention (not calling the attention of a crook)
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby ManontheMove » Mon Jan 25, 2010 10:14 pm

I sold my camera online... went with friends in a public place for security and received $700 USD in false bills... Can't imagine how I felt...

But it's only a camera... but I loved it!
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby animaljlt » Sun Feb 14, 2010 9:01 pm

I was robbed 5 years ago at gunpoint by 4 guys who drove up in a car and wanted my cell phone. In broad daylight Callao. In front of 20 people. Now im planning on moving to Peru. Ain't nobody scared.

FYI...I didn't even have my cell phone and they forgot to get the $300 i had in my front pocket. IMO the streets of USA is a bit more scary when you are in the ghettos. I'm for sure those thugs want more than a couple bucks and have guns that work.
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby adrian Thorne » Mon Feb 15, 2010 7:21 am

I have been offered a consultancy job two days a week for nine months in Huarmey. I will need to travel by car from my home in Lima. Should I pack a stun gun, pepper spray and two pistols or should I just turn the job down??????
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby antonio » Mon Feb 15, 2010 10:22 am

adrian Thorne wrote:I have been offered a consultancy job two days a week for nine months in Huarmey. I will need to travel by car from my home in Lima. Should I pack a stun gun, pepper spray and two pistols or should I just turn the job down??????


Adrian, I suggest to open a new thread for getting more help..

I want to help you, but have you think considering using top notch buses + a recommended local taxi driver while in Huarmey ?

Huarmey is around 5 hours by bus from Lima..
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby euroman » Tue Feb 16, 2010 2:17 pm

Don`t think that only gringos get robbed. Most people who get robbed are Peruvians.

I feel safer in Peru than in Europe or the US.
The only way to avoid theft and robbery is to prevent it.
You don`t get robbed because you are a gringo...you get robbed because you gave thieves the opportunity by not taking care of your stuff.
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby tomsax » Tue Feb 16, 2010 2:48 pm

adrian Thorne wrote:I have been offered a consultancy job two days a week for nine months in Huarmey. I will need to travel by car from my home in Lima. Should I pack a stun gun, pepper spray and two pistols or should I just turn the job down??????


I think Huarmey is on the panamerican highway going north, just before Chimbote. I wouldn't have thought it was particularly dangerous to get there. I would think most dangerous thing would be the buses that try to overtake each other. If you live in Lima you must be used to a certain amount of risk anyway. But I must admit don't know the road around the area or Huarmey that well.
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby susita83 » Tue Feb 16, 2010 7:09 pm

I agree but there are some extremely talented pickpockets in Lima I have to say. They make their own opportunities.

My husband is Peruvian and his cell phone was stolen right out of his front pocket of his jeans while out in Lima and he didn't even so much as feel it. He is very aware and always keeps everything tucked away (watch, wallet, phone, etc).

Also, a good friend of my husband's got beaten and robbed in Lima while on his way home from work, (waiting for combi). The only mistake he made was going home from work.

I have been very lucky and never had this happen to me while in Peru :)

euroman wrote:Don`t think that only gringos get robbed. Most people who get robbed are Peruvians.

I feel safer in Peru than in Europe or the US.
The only way to avoid theft and robbery is to prevent it.
You don`t get robbed because you are a gringo...you get robbed because you gave thieves the opportunity by not taking care of your stuff.
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby MartitaAQP » Tue Mar 02, 2010 6:10 pm

I don't know about everyone else, but I feel somewhat differently about a theif on the streets of Peru than I do about a thief on the streets of the US. When attacked here, it is much more likely they just want your wallet and cellphone whereas in the US they are a lot more likely to be a rapist or a murderer. Of course, that said, I grew up in a US community where it was never necessary to lock the doors so adjusting to life in Peru definitely required a lot more alertness (thankfully crime in Arequipa is nothing like Lima and I don't travel in Lima unaccompanied anymore). I do carry a telescoping baton which my novio has taught me how to use for self protection. He additionally carries a powerful stun gun and has had to use both his baton and stun gun on multiple occasions when attacked on the street. I have not yet had to use mine when alone, thankfully. What I feel strongly about here is that a NON-LETHAL weapon is much preferable for self defense.

I have nothing against guns, and hate the controls here in Peru or I would own one, but they are not a good choice as a primary weapon of self defense here in my opinion. FIrst of all, very few attackers carry them (unlike in the streets of the US) and secondly, most attackers are minor criminals, even just stupid kids, who believe stealing is a temporary fix to poverty. I can't imagine killing a 17 year old kid who's dad's an alcoholic and kicked him out of the house and he's trying to grab a wallet to find a place to stay. Poverty is not a cause of crime nor an excuse but I think it is important to recognize the reality of where we live and self-defense should be to DEFEND and not to kill. Not to mention, self-defense laws here are nothing like in the US and you will probably end up in jail if you DO shoot someone who was trying to rob you. So get a stun gun or a baton and you can get the person off of you (never threaten, just USE) and maybe save your stuff, but save the lethal weapons for those occasions we really do need them. Btw, I have spent nearly 10 years carrying laptops, expensive photography equipment, ipods and iphones and at times even more expensive equipment and up 'til now I have never had anything taken. I strongly believe in being "pilas" and making sure no one knows what you have and where you are going.
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby sanbartoloian » Thu Mar 04, 2010 12:47 pm

MartitaAQP wrote:I don't know about everyone else, but I feel somewhat differently about a theif on the streets of Peru than I do about a thief on the streets of the US. When attacked here, it is much more likely they just want your wallet and cellphone whereas in the US they are a lot more likely to be a rapist or a murderer. Of course, that said, I grew up in a US community where it was never necessary to lock the doors so adjusting to life in Peru definitely required a lot more alertness (thankfully crime in Arequipa is nothing like Lima and I don't travel in Lima unaccompanied anymore). I do carry a telescoping baton which my novio has taught me how to use for self protection. He additionally carries a powerful stun gun and has had to use both his baton and stun gun on multiple occasions when attacked on the street. I have not yet had to use mine when alone, thankfully. What I feel strongly about here is that a NON-LETHAL weapon is much preferable for self defense.

I have nothing against guns, and hate the controls here in Peru or I would own one, but they are not a good choice as a primary weapon of self defense here in my opinion. FIrst of all, very few attackers carry them (unlike in the streets of the US) and secondly, most attackers are minor criminals, even just stupid kids, who believe stealing is a temporary fix to poverty. I can't imagine killing a 17 year old kid who's dad's an alcoholic and kicked him out of the house and he's trying to grab a wallet to find a place to stay. Poverty is not a cause of crime nor an excuse but I think it is important to recognize the reality of where we live and self-defense should be to DEFEND and not to kill. Not to mention, self-defense laws here are nothing like in the US and you will probably end up in jail if you DO shoot someone who was trying to rob you. So get a stun gun or a baton and you can get the person off of you (never threaten, just USE) and maybe save your stuff, but save the lethal weapons for those occasions we really do need them. Btw, I have spent nearly 10 years carrying laptops, expensive photography equipment, ipods and iphones and at times even more expensive equipment and up 'til now I have never had anything taken. I strongly believe in being "pilas" and making sure no one knows what you have and where you are going.


There is no arguing about the number of firearms in the US but I am not entirely sure people robbing you want to also rape and kill you anymore than here in Peru. 9 million plus people gives you a pretty large sample where is suspect you will find a significant number of people willing to hurt or rape you. More and more firearms are appearing in the commission of crimes. Data about crime to me is always suspect. The anecdote of the 17 year old is good but you will find the same kid in the US and he has had great training in crime by the system that has arrested him and a penal system where he was brutalized if not raped. That is true in the US and seems to be true in Peru.
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Re: My turn to get robbed

Postby Wine Lover » Thu Mar 04, 2010 1:15 pm

People are street crims because they decide to be.
There are plenty of people making an honest living here, earning their S/.10-S/.20 per day to feed their family.

I agree though, a gun is not the solution.

If only I knew aikido.

This guy wouldnt have too many problems in Peru
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RiJiaMiuKpQ

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