Vegetable Spawns Larceny and Luxury in Peru

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adrian Thorne
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Vegetable Spawns Larceny and Luxury in Peru

Postby adrian Thorne » Mon Dec 08, 2014 1:41 pm

As maca booms, some Peruvians fear that they are losing control of a valuable crop with a history that goes back long before the time of the Inca empire.
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/07/world ... c=rss&_r=1


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Guiri
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Re: Vegetable Spawns Larceny and Luxury in Peru

Postby Guiri » Mon Dec 08, 2014 2:04 pm

Well , the price for quinoa and maca tenfold and the Natives cant effort their basic protein source anymore...because of a western craze...history repeats itself...again :(
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Alan
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Re: Vegetable Spawns Larceny and Luxury in Peru

Postby Alan » Mon Dec 08, 2014 4:10 pm

Guiri wrote:Well , the price for quinoa and maca tenfold and the Natives cant effort their basic protein source anymore...because of a western craze...history repeats itself...again :(


I am sure there are other sources of cheap protein in Peru, Guiri. Eggs, soy, Sacha Inchi to name just a few. How about considering the other side of the story, also pointed out in the article:


“It has changed my life,” said Pilar Cóndor, 25, standing beside her new black Toyota HiLux pickup truck, her 7-month-old baby, Kenny, wrapped in a colorful shawl on her back. “Not many people my age can buy a pickup truck based on their work.”

She said that her family, which together farmed about 250 acres of maca this year, also built an addition to their house and bought a truck to transport harvested maca. A day earlier, she said, they sold nine tons of maca for about $7.80 a pound, which adds up to more than $140,000.
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Guiri
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Re: Vegetable Spawns Larceny and Luxury in Peru

Postby Guiri » Mon Dec 08, 2014 4:42 pm

Well..everything has two sides I guess ?
"Our organisation is based on our original authorities, which divide the land equally among every citizen,"
Many former rural residents turned city dwellers have grabbed the opportunity to start a profitable business, coming back to their original communities, and in some cases causing conflicts.
"These newcomers are getting back to their villages thanks to the subsides of the government, breaking the previous organisation of the community.
They come, seed and go away, without taking part in the community assembly," said Vladimir Orsag, a researcher at San Andres Mayor University.
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Alan
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Re: Vegetable Spawns Larceny and Luxury in Peru

Postby Alan » Mon Dec 08, 2014 6:03 pm

Guiri wrote:Well..everything has two sides I guess ?
"Our organisation is based on our original authorities, which divide the land equally among every citizen,"
Many former rural residents turned city dwellers have grabbed the opportunity to start a profitable business, coming back to their original communities, and in some cases causing conflicts.
"These newcomers are getting back to their villages thanks to the subsides of the government, breaking the previous organisation of the community.
They come, seed and go away, without taking part in the community assembly," said Vladimir Orsag, a researcher at San Andres Mayor University.


At least two sides, and probably many, many more. I suppose the question is whether in the overall balance of things having city dwelling ex-rural residents return to their land to seen and harvest a profitable crop does greater good, or greater damage to the rural community, and the country as a whole. My bet is that overall, it´s a good thing.

It is an interesting quote that you pulled. Let´s analyze it: "newcomers" (who are actually rural residents turned city dwellers.. not "newcomers" at all. ) have come back to their original communities to engage in a profitable business. My guess is that they are farming land that they had abandoned years ago when they were driven out of the countryside by lack of opportunity and terrorism, but now they have returned to "seed and go away"... clearly not feeling the need to live in the small town which they left years before, a place which offers their families limited education and limited health care, prefering instead to maintain their homes in the city and farm from afar - which they can now do thanks to the much improved telecomunication and vial network that now exists.

It would be nice to have a bit more information about the "subsidies" that are mentioned, and how their lack of participation in the community is harmful.
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Re: Vegetable Spawns Larceny and Luxury in Peru

Postby Guiri » Mon Dec 08, 2014 6:50 pm

Alan wrote:
Guiri wrote:It would be nice to have a bit more information about the "subsidies" that are mentioned, and how their lack of participation in the community is harmful.

Well about the subsidies , there is certainly something to find on govermental websites and about the harmful effect on the communities...mmh thats common sense. :D
Ever lived in the countryside ??
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Alan
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Re: Vegetable Spawns Larceny and Luxury in Peru

Postby Alan » Mon Dec 08, 2014 9:26 pm

Guiri wrote:
Alan wrote:
Guiri wrote:It would be nice to have a bit more information about the "subsidies" that are mentioned, and how their lack of participation in the community is harmful.

Well about the subsidies , there is certainly something to find on govermental websites and about the harmful effect on the communities...mmh thats common sense. :D
Ever lived in the countryside ??


I lived and worked with campesinos for a few months back in the 1980´s in the Mantaro Valley. Some of the land was communally farmed, but other patches were privately owned. The town (about 100 people) was mostly full of old people and children; most anybody who was young or middle aged had moved to the city. This exodus increased when the violence really got underway and a lot of land was abandoned.

About the subsidies, I have heard of the Juntos subsidy, but that doesn´t seem aimed at this kind of production. I´ve never heard of an agro subsidy for growers here (at least recentl), though there are tarrifs on the import of some products (maiz and sugar). But subsidies on production? Sounds fishy.

Can anybody shed some light on this?
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Re: Vegetable Spawns Larceny and Luxury in Peru

Postby tomsax » Mon Dec 15, 2014 4:29 pm

I think Guiri is talking about guinoa, and Bolivia not Peru.
Tom
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Re: Vegetable Spawns Larceny and Luxury in Peru

Postby Alan » Wed May 25, 2016 8:22 am

Just spotted a new article to add to this old discussion

http://www.economist.com/news/finance-a ... inst-grain
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Re: Vegetable Spawns Larceny and Luxury in Peru

Postby tomsax » Wed May 25, 2016 12:38 pm

Very interesting Alan.

The last sentence reads : "The main hope of Andean producers is to carve out a niche in the market with their authentic, organic, “heirloom” quinoa, appealing to the same consumers who were warned away back in 2013".

I came across this sort of quinoa in Andahuaylas when I worked there. it was smaller grained guinoa that was more resistant to pests. The main quinoa exported is reliant on pesticides as well as fertilizers. But the more traditional quinoa was not commericial as it looked too different. But with the right marketting...
Tom

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