Biggest Culture Shocks?

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falconagain
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Re: Biggest Culture Shocks?

Postby falconagain » Tue Jun 11, 2013 9:28 pm

Peru
Major infectious diseases: degree of risk: very high
food or waterborne diseases: bacterial, hepatitis A, and typhoid fever
vectorborne disease: dengue fever, malaria, and yellow fever
water contact disease: leptospirosis (2009)

Definition: This entry lists major infectious diseases likely to be encountered in countries where the risk of such diseases is assessed to be very high as compared to the United States. These infectious diseases represent risks to US government personnel traveling to the specified country for a period of less than three years. The degree of risk is assessed by considering the foreign nature of these infectious diseases, their severity, and the probability of being affected by the diseases present. The diseases listed do not necessarily represent the total disease burden experienced by the local population.
The risk to an individual traveler varies considerably by the specific location, visit duration, type of activities, type of accommodations, time of year, and other factors. Consultation with a travel medicine physician is needed to evaluate individual risk and recommend appropriate preventive measures such as vaccines.
Diseases are organized into the following six exposure categories shown in italics and listed in typical descending order of risk. Note: The sequence of exposure categories listed in individual country entries may vary according to local conditions.
food or waterborne diseases acquired through eating or drinking on the local economy
:
Hepatitis A - viral disease that interferes with the functioning of the liver; spread through consumption of food or water contaminated with fecal matter, principally in areas of poor sanitation; victims exhibit fever, jaundice, and diarrhea; 15% of victims will experience prolonged symptoms over 6-9 months; vaccine available.
Hepatitis E - water-borne viral disease that interferes with the functioning of the liver; most commonly spread through fecal contamination of drinking water; victims exhibit jaundice, fatigue, abdominal pain, and dark colored urine.
Typhoid fever - bacterial disease spread through contact with food or water contaminated by fecal matter or sewage; victims exhibit sustained high fevers; left untreated, mortality rates can reach 20%.
vectorborne diseases acquired through the bite of an infected arthropod:
Malaria - caused by single-cell parasitic protozoa Plasmodium; transmitted to humans via the bite of the female Anopheles mosquito; parasites multiply in the liver attacking red blood cells resulting in cycles of fever, chills, and sweats accompanied by anemia; death due to damage to vital organs and interruption of blood supply to the brain; endemic in 100, mostly tropical, countries with 90% of cases and the majority of 1.5-2.5 million estimated annual deaths occurring in sub-Saharan Africa.
Dengue fever - mosquito-borne (Aedes aegypti) viral disease associated with urban environments; manifests as sudden onset of fever and severe headache; occasionally produces shock and hemorrhage leading to death in 5% of cases.
Yellow fever - mosquito-borne viral disease; severity ranges from influenza-like symptoms to severe hepatitis and hemorrhagic fever; occurs only in tropical South America and sub-Saharan Africa, where most cases are reported; fatality rate is less than 20%.
Japanese Encephalitis - mosquito-borne (Culex tritaeniorhynchus) viral disease associated with rural areas in Asia; acute encephalitis can progress to paralysis, coma, and death; fatality rates 30%.
African Trypanosomiasis - caused by the parasitic protozoa Trypanosoma; transmitted to humans via the bite of bloodsucking Tsetse flies; infection leads to malaise and irregular fevers and, in advanced cases when the parasites invade the central nervous system, coma and death; endemic in 36 countries of sub-Saharan Africa; cattle and wild animals act as reservoir hosts for the parasites.
Cutaneous Leishmaniasis - caused by the parasitic protozoa leishmania; transmitted to humans via the bite of sandflies; results in skin lesions that may become chronic; endemic in 88 countries; 90% of cases occur in Iran, Afghanistan, Syria, Saudi Arabia, Brazil, and Peru; wild and domesticated animals as well as humans can act as reservoirs of infection.
Plague - bacterial disease transmitted by fleas normally associated with rats; person-to-person airborne transmission also possible; recent plague epidemics occurred in areas of Asia, Africa, and South America associated with rural areas or small towns and villages; manifests as fever, headache, and painfully swollen lymph nodes; disease progresses rapidly and without antibiotic treatment leads to pneumonic form with a death rate in excess of 50%.
Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever - tick-borne viral disease; infection may also result from exposure to infected animal blood or tissue; geographic distribution includes Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and Eastern Europe; sudden onset of fever, headache, and muscle aches followed by hemorrhaging in the bowels, urine, nose, and gums; mortality rate is approximately 30%.
Rift Valley fever - viral disease affecting domesticated animals and humans; transmission is by mosquito and other biting insects; infection may also occur through handling of infected meat or contact with blood; geographic distribution includes eastern and southern Africa where cattle and sheep are raised; symptoms are generally mild with fever and some liver abnormalities, but the disease may progress to hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis, or ocular disease; fatality rates are low at about 1% of cases.
Chikungunya - mosquito-borne (Aedes aegypti) viral disease associated with urban environments, similar to Dengue Fever; characterized by sudden onset of fever, rash, and severe joint pain usually lasting 3-7 days, some cases result in persistent arthritis.
water contact diseases acquired through swimming or wading in freshwater lakes, streams, and rivers:
Leptospirosis - bacterial disease that affects animals and humans; infection occurs through contact with water, food, or soil contaminated by animal urine; symptoms include high fever, severe headache, vomiting, jaundice, and diarrhea; untreated, the disease can result in kidney damage, liver failure, meningitis, or respiratory distress; fatality rates are low but left untreated recovery can take months.
Schistosomiasis - caused by parasitic trematode flatworm Schistosoma; fresh water snails act as intermediate host and release larval form of parasite that penetrates the skin of people exposed to contaminated water; worms mature and reproduce in the blood vessels, liver, kidneys, and intestines releasing eggs, which become trapped in tissues triggering an immune response; may manifest as either urinary or intestinal disease resulting in decreased work or learning capacity; mortality, while generally low, may occur in advanced cases usually due to bladder cancer; endemic in 74 developing countries with 80% of infected people living in sub-Saharan Africa; humans act as the reservoir for this parasite.
aerosolized dust or soil contact disease acquired through inhalation of aerosols contaminated with rodent urine:
Lassa fever - viral disease carried by rats of the genus Mastomys; endemic in portions of West Africa; infection occurs through direct contact with or consumption of food contaminated by rodent urine or fecal matter containing virus particles; fatality rate can reach 50% in epidemic outbreaks.
respiratory disease acquired through close contact with an infectious person:
Meningococcal meningitis - bacterial disease causing an inflammation of the lining of the brain and spinal cord; one of the most important bacterial pathogens is Neisseria meningitidis because of its potential to cause epidemics; symptoms include stiff neck, high fever, headaches, and vomiting; bacteria are transmitted from person to person by respiratory droplets and facilitated by close and prolonged contact resulting from crowded living conditions, often with a seasonal distribution; death occurs in 5-15% of cases, typically within 24-48 hours of onset of symptoms; highest burden of meningococcal disease occurs in the hyperendemic region of sub-Saharan Africa known as the "Meningitis Belt" which stretches from Senegal east to Ethiopia.
animal contact disease acquired through direct contact with local animals:
Rabies - viral disease of mammals usually transmitted through the bite of an infected animal, most commonly dogs; virus affects the central nervous system causing brain alteration and death; symptoms initially are non-specific fever and headache progressing to neurological symptoms; death occurs within days of the onset of symptoms.

Source: CIA World Factbook - Unless otherwise noted, information in this page is accurate as of February 21, 2013

enjoy :)


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Re: Biggest Culture Shocks?

Postby Hitoruna » Tue Jun 11, 2013 9:30 pm

there goes my lunch :roll:
falconagain
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Re: Biggest Culture Shocks?

Postby falconagain » Wed Jun 12, 2013 7:13 pm

If any of those does not kill you. There is a whole list of side effects that affect the majority
of the population: body deformities (face, height, size of arms and legs), chronic sickness,
decrease in intelligence and weird allergies.
BellbottomBlues
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Re: Biggest Culture Shocks?

Postby BellbottomBlues » Thu Jun 13, 2013 5:20 am

Lovely, just lovely.

What, no cholera outbreaks too?

Do most of these issues ease the farther you move away from Lima?


BBB
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Re: Biggest Culture Shocks?

Postby SmartKitty » Thu Jun 13, 2013 6:52 am

BellbottomBlues wrote:Lovely, just lovely.
What, no cholera outbreaks too?
Do most of these issues ease the farther you move away from Lima?
BBB

Peru Major infectious diseases
Major infectious diseases: degree of risk: very high
food or waterborne diseases: bacterial, hepatitis A, and typhoid fever
vectorborne disease: dengue fever, malaria, and yellow fever
water contact disease: leptospirosis (2009)
................
food or waterborne diseases acquired through eating or drinking on the local economy:
Hepatitis A - viral disease that interferes with the functioning of the liver; spread through consumption of food or water contaminated with fecal matter, principally in areas of poor sanitation; victims exhibit fever, jaundice, and diarrhea; 15% of victims will experience prolonged symptoms over 6-9 months; vaccine available.
Hepatitis E - water-borne viral disease that interferes with the functioning of the liver; most commonly spread through fecal contamination of drinking water; victims exhibit jaundice, fatigue, abdominal pain, and dark colored urine.
Typhoid fever - bacterial disease spread through contact with food or water contaminated by fecal matter or sewage; victims exhibit sustained high fevers; left untreated, mortality rates can reach 20%.
vectorborne diseases acquired through the bite of an infected arthropod:
Malaria - caused by single-cell parasitic protozoa Plasmodium; transmitted to humans via the bite of the female Anopheles mosquito; parasites multiply in the liver attacking red blood cells resulting in cycles of fever, chills, and sweats accompanied by anemia; death due to damage to vital organs and interruption of blood supply to the brain; endemic in 100, mostly tropical, countries with 90% of cases and the majority of 1.5-2.5 million estimated annual deaths occurring in sub-Saharan Africa.
Dengue fever - mosquito-borne (Aedes aegypti) viral disease associated with urban environments; manifests as sudden onset of fever and severe headache; occasionally produces shock and hemorrhage leading to death in 5% of cases.
Yellow fever - mosquito-borne viral disease; severity ranges from influenza-like symptoms to severe hepatitis and hemorrhagic fever; occurs only in tropical South America and sub-Saharan Africa, where most cases are reported; fatality rate is less than 20%.
Japanese Encephalitis - mosquito-borne (Culex tritaeniorhynchus) viral disease associated with rural areas in Asia; acute encephalitis can progress to paralysis, coma, and death; fatality rates 30%.
African Trypanosomiasis - caused by the parasitic protozoa Trypanosoma; transmitted to humans via the bite of bloodsucking Tsetse flies; infection leads to malaise and irregular fevers and, in advanced cases when the parasites invade the central nervous system, coma and death; endemic in 36 countries of sub-Saharan Africa; cattle and wild animals act as reservoir hosts for the parasites.
Cutaneous Leishmaniasis - caused by the parasitic protozoa leishmania; transmitted to humans via the bite of sandflies; results in skin lesions that may become chronic; endemic in 88 countries; 90% of cases occur in Iran, Afghanistan, Syria, Saudi Arabia, Brazil, and Peru; wild and domesticated animals as well as humans can act as reservoirs of infection.
Plague - bacterial disease transmitted by fleas normally associated with rats; person-to-person airborne transmission also possible; recent plague epidemics occurred in areas of Asia, Africa, and South America associated with rural areas or small towns and villages; manifests as fever, headache, and painfully swollen lymph nodes; disease progresses rapidly and without antibiotic treatment leads to pneumonic form with a death rate in excess of 50%.
Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever - tick-borne viral disease; infection may also result from exposure to infected animal blood or tissue; geographic distribution includes Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and Eastern Europe; sudden onset of fever, headache, and muscle aches followed by hemorrhaging in the bowels, urine, nose, and gums; mortality rate is approximately 30%.
Rift Valley fever - viral disease affecting domesticated animals and humans; transmission is by mosquito and other biting insects; infection may also occur through handling of infected meat or contact with blood; geographic distribution includes eastern and southern Africa where cattle and sheep are raised; symptoms are generally mild with fever and some liver abnormalities, but the disease may progress to hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis, or ocular disease; fatality rates are low at about 1% of cases.
Chikungunya - mosquito-borne (Aedes aegypti) viral disease associated with urban environments, similar to Dengue Fever; characterized by sudden onset of fever, rash, and severe joint pain usually lasting 3-7 days, some cases result in persistent arthritis.
water contact diseases acquired through swimming or wading in freshwater lakes, streams, and rivers:
Leptospirosis - bacterial disease that affects animals and humans; infection occurs through contact with water, food, or soil contaminated by animal urine; symptoms include high fever, severe headache, vomiting, jaundice, and diarrhea; untreated, the disease can result in kidney damage, liver failure, meningitis, or respiratory distress; fatality rates are low but left untreated recovery can take months.
Schistosomiasis - caused by parasitic trematode flatworm Schistosoma; fresh water snails act as intermediate host and release larval form of parasite that penetrates the skin of people exposed to contaminated water; worms mature and reproduce in the blood vessels, liver, kidneys, and intestines releasing eggs, which become trapped in tissues triggering an immune response; may manifest as either urinary or intestinal disease resulting in decreased work or learning capacity; mortality, while generally low, may occur in advanced cases usually due to bladder cancer; endemic in 74 developing countries with 80% of infected people living in sub-Saharan Africa; humans act as the reservoir for this parasite.
aerosolized dust or soil contact disease acquired through inhalation of aerosols contaminated with rodent urine:
Lassa fever - viral disease carried by rats of the genus Mastomys; endemic in portions of West Africa; infection occurs through direct contact with or consumption of food contaminated by rodent urine or fecal matter containing virus particles; fatality rate can reach 50% in epidemic outbreaks.
respiratory disease acquired through close contact with an infectious person:
Meningococcal meningitis - bacterial disease causing an inflammation of the lining of the brain and spinal cord; one of the most important bacterial pathogens is Neisseria meningitidis because of its potential to cause epidemics; symptoms include stiff neck, high fever, headaches, and vomiting; bacteria are transmitted from person to person by respiratory droplets and facilitated by close and prolonged contact resulting from crowded living conditions, often with a seasonal distribution; death occurs in 5-15% of cases, typically within 24-48 hours of onset of symptoms; highest burden of meningococcal disease occurs in the hyperendemic region of sub-Saharan Africa known as the "Meningitis Belt" which stretches from Senegal east to Ethiopia.
animal contact disease acquired through direct contact with local animals:
Rabies - viral disease of mammals usually transmitted through the bite of an infected animal, most commonly dogs; virus affects the central nervous system causing brain alteration and death; symptoms initially are non-specific fever and headache progressing to neurological symptoms; death occurs within days of the onset of symptoms.
http://www.indexmundi.com/peru/major_in ... eases.html
My name is Fortunata Carhuapoma, pies de plomo. I'm a modest serrano girl in polleras and alpargatas.
SmartKitty
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Re: Biggest Culture Shocks?

Postby SmartKitty » Thu Jun 13, 2013 6:53 am

falconagain wrote:If any of those does not kill you. There is a whole list of side effects that affect the majority
of the population: body deformities (face, height, size of arms and legs), chronic sickness,
decrease in intelligence and weird allergies.

Agree. And as I said before, not good to raise kids. :(
My name is Fortunata Carhuapoma, pies de plomo. I'm a modest serrano girl in polleras and alpargatas.
victmanu
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Re: Biggest Culture Shocks?

Postby victmanu » Thu Jun 13, 2013 9:21 am

The same chilean troll using two different nicknames in order to post whatever they find to trash peruvian people.
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Re: Biggest Culture Shocks?

Postby ariel » Thu Jun 13, 2013 9:30 am

victmanu wrote:The same chilean troll using two different nicknames in order to post whatever they find to trash peruvian people.


Thought as much.
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Re: Biggest Culture Shocks?

Postby falconagain » Thu Jun 13, 2013 10:04 am

ariel wrote:
victmanu wrote:The same chilean troll using two different nicknames in order to post whatever they find to trash peruvian people.


Thought as much.


I am 100% Peruvian and 100% truthful.
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Re: Biggest Culture Shocks?

Postby SmartKitty » Thu Jun 13, 2013 10:36 am

y yo, no tengo ni por que explicar a 2 falsos patriotas que pretender que en el Peru no pasa nada.

Si ocultamos los problemas, como podemos arreglarlos?
My name is Fortunata Carhuapoma, pies de plomo. I'm a modest serrano girl in polleras and alpargatas.
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Re: Biggest Culture Shocks?

Postby sbaustin » Thu Jun 13, 2013 10:59 am

I think many of the diseases are related to the jungle.
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Re: Biggest Culture Shocks?

Postby SmartKitty » Thu Jun 13, 2013 11:43 am

Just read World Health Organization reports about Peru
http://www.who.int/countries/per/en/index.html
My name is Fortunata Carhuapoma, pies de plomo. I'm a modest serrano girl in polleras and alpargatas.
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Re: Biggest Culture Shocks?

Postby Hitoruna » Thu Jun 13, 2013 6:58 pm

BellbottomBlues wrote:Lovely, just lovely.

What, no cholera outbreaks too?

Do most of these issues ease the farther you move away from Lima?


BBB


No, Bellbottom, as falcon said, we are all deforms ... :mrgreen:

think something like Jabba the hut palace... something like that :lol:
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Re: Biggest Culture Shocks?

Postby chante » Thu Jun 13, 2013 9:14 pm

I think most of the health issues listed are not a major concern living in the "expat" area in Lima, nor in Arequipa where I live, except for the water which I don't drink. Many of the other issues are from the jungle or other remote areas.
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Re: Biggest Culture Shocks?

Postby falconagain » Thu Jun 13, 2013 9:33 pm

chante wrote:I think most of the health issues listed are not a major concern living in the "expat" area in Lima, nor in Arequipa where I live, except for the water which I don't drink. Many of the other issues are from the jungle or other remote areas.


Actually the mentioned diseases are present in all cities within Peru. There is several areas of
Lima that are as polluted as la Oroya (The dirtiest place in Peru, and one of the dirtiest in the world). I could try to list the places of all cities that are currently known but the problem is that there is not enough space to post all that information. Also people need to understand that the bacteria that
causes these diseases is carried by the people from the provinces to the capital and other cities.
The people with the worst sickness are isolated by the health department in certain areas of Lima.

Up to the year 2000, Tubercolosis was very common in Lima, and expensive for the State to cure
due to the fact that the infected people already self medicated themselves. Fortunately the new
governments of Toledo, Garcia and Humala decided to outlaw the sale of all Anti Tubercolosis
medication in Lima in order to avoid the excessive costs to the government. Now most of these
people of the provinces die because they cannot pay for the medication and the government
does not supply free help anymore. It was something fair and just because these people were
very irresponsible and infected others within the city. Now the sickness runs its course and kills
them before they cause any trouble to other. Justice and Fairness in Peru.
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Re: Biggest Culture Shocks?

Postby Hitoruna » Thu Jun 13, 2013 9:45 pm

falconagain wrote:
chante wrote:I think most of the health issues listed are not a major concern living in the "expat" area in Lima, nor in Arequipa where I live, except for the water which I don't drink. Many of the other issues are from the jungle or other remote areas.


Actually the mentioned diseases are present in all cities within Peru. There is several areas of
Lima that are as polluted as la Oroya (The dirtiest place in Peru, and one of the dirtiest in the world). I could try to list the places of all cities that are currently known but the problem is that there is not enough space to post all that information. Also people need to understand that the bacteria that
causes these diseases is carried by the people from the provinces to the capital and other cities.
The people with the worst sickness are isolated by the health department in certain areas of Lima.

Up to the year 2000, Tubercolosis was very common in Lima, and expensive for the State to cure
due to the fact that the infected people already self medicated themselves. Fortunately the new
governments of Toledo, Garcia and Humala decided to outlaw the sale of all Anti Tubercolosis
medication in Lima in order to avoid the excessive costs to the government. Now most of these
people of the provinces die because they cannot pay for the medication and the government
does not supply free help anymore. It was something fair and just because these people were
very irresponsible and infected others within the city. Now the sickness runs its course and kills
them before they cause any trouble to other. Justice and Fairness in Peru.


Yes, "menos indios", right?

too bad some of us survived and led pretty good lives :lol:
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Re: Biggest Culture Shocks?

Postby falconagain » Thu Jun 13, 2013 10:39 pm

Hitoruna wrote:
falconagain wrote:
chante wrote:I think most of the health issues listed are not a major concern living in the "expat" area in Lima, nor in Arequipa where I live, except for the water which I don't drink. Many of the other issues are from the jungle or other remote areas.


Actually the mentioned diseases are present in all cities within Peru. There is several areas of
Lima that are as polluted as la Oroya (The dirtiest place in Peru, and one of the dirtiest in the world). I could try to list the places of all cities that are currently known but the problem is that there is not enough space to post all that information. Also people need to understand that the bacteria that
causes these diseases is carried by the people from the provinces to the capital and other cities.
The people with the worst sickness are isolated by the health department in certain areas of Lima.

Up to the year 2000, Tubercolosis was very common in Lima, and expensive for the State to cure
due to the fact that the infected people already self medicated themselves. Fortunately the new
governments of Toledo, Garcia and Humala decided to outlaw the sale of all Anti Tubercolosis
medication in Lima in order to avoid the excessive costs to the government. Now most of these
people of the provinces die because they cannot pay for the medication and the government
does not supply free help anymore. It was something fair and just because these people were
very irresponsible and infected others within the city. Now the sickness runs its course and kills
them before they cause any trouble to other. Justice and Fairness in Peru.


Yes, "menos indios", right?

too bad some of us survived and led pretty good lives :lol:


I am indian myself so I do not know what are you talking about.
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Re: Biggest Culture Shocks?

Postby SmartKitty » Fri Jun 14, 2013 5:29 am

chante wrote:I think most of the health issues listed are not a major concern living in the "expat" area in Lima, nor in Arequipa where I live, except for the water which I don't drink. Many of the other issues are from the jungle or other remote areas.

You can "think" but the statistics are telling you exactly that the health problem from food, water and viruses are all over Peru, including Lima and Arequipa. Expats are not living in the sterile bubble.

And congratulations, you don't drink water. Probably you don't shower either, don't eat and even don't walk on Peruvian soil.

Just read the WHO reports and statistics from my post above and try to think for to be safe.
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Re: Biggest Culture Shocks?

Postby chante » Fri Jun 14, 2013 10:21 am

Bellbottoms - your original post was about cultural shock; I think that varies depending on the individual and what one is accustomed to. What I noticed the most was the walls and fences around homes and the bars on windows. I come from Western Canada and am use to large front yards, no fences or small fences to hold in a dog - almost no one has bars on the window.

As to health concerns - use your own judgement.
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Re: Biggest Culture Shocks?

Postby bryanav » Fri Jun 14, 2013 10:30 am

In regards to biggest culture shocks:

2 years ago, I spent a year in Peru and then came back. I didn't stay in Lima, I stayed in Piura. The odd thing, was that I was more culture shocked coming back to the states than I was when I went to Peru. But here are a few of the things that I found to be really different, besides the obvious.

1) The Peruvians have their own way of getting things done. It's not right or wrong.. just different. (In the begining, I would get kind of annoyed because I wanted it done MY way lol. ) But for example, one man may ask you, "Hey, I need this easy construction thing done, will you come by and help out at 10am Thursday?" Your thinking this will be 1 hour, 2 hour tops. So, at about 10:45 am on Thursday everyone will meet up where the construction needs to be done- but you will not have any of the materials or tools needed to do it. The materials you need may be spread out across town, and even if there are 5 of you, you will probably all go together to get everything. (no splitting up!) By the time your back and ready to actually do the work, what you thought would only be a 2 hour thing, has turned into an all day affair.
*I'm using contruction as an example, but it seemed to be that way in many ways. Sometimes, when I went to lunch at a friends or helping out with the school. You just gotta go with the flow.

2) Anxiety when walking. In the beginning, I would get so annoyed that the Peruvians didn't watch where they were walking. I was a nervous mess, weaving in and out of people, apologizing and excusing myself. LOL. I made it way worse than it actually had to be. In the end, I learned where the potholes were and stopped paying attention to where I was walking also. When I did that, somehow, it felt like I was floating through the crowd with no stress. If me and another person bumped into each other.. oh well.

3) Hola Gordita!! I am overweight (and I was alot heavier when I was there. I lost 50lbs while I was there!) and when I would walk down the street, everyone would greet me, "Hola gordita!" Some people would flat out ask me why I was so fat. When I lost the weight some people would just call me little white girl. I was surprised at how peruvians take the most obvious thing about you and call you that- and mean no harm whatsoever.

I'm sure I could name others. In Piura, everyone dressed in bright colors- not dark. I'm seriously still sick of all neon colors and "punk- like" 80's clothes. And then getting scorned for drinking cold water when its cold out. Anyways...
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Re: Biggest Culture Shocks?

Postby ariel » Fri Jun 14, 2013 11:26 am

@bryanav: Finally! A relevant post after sometime. Thanks for the breath of fresh air. :)

Re 'gordita', it's another way of saying you're just different. :)

But in a similar manner as far as culture, my jaw literally dropped the first time I heard someone being called "negra" on live TV. My wife quickly explained to me that it didn't mean anything other than as a term of endearment. They also use 'chino' (not necessarily Chinese, e.g. Fujimori was called 'chino' by those who somehow found him 'endearing'), 'cholo', 'serrano', 'charapa', etc.
Last edited by ariel on Fri Jun 14, 2013 12:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Biggest Culture Shocks?

Postby Tyree » Fri Jun 14, 2013 11:37 am

Culture shocks? I am late to this party, and I am sure that maybe you have already arrived in Peru and can write your own opinion. However, here are some of my humble opinins...probably nothing "shocking" but pleanty of things that are irritating...some that have evolved to even being mildly humorous.

Restrooms: Don't be surprised to walk into or out of a restroom and find members of the opposite sex hanging around cleaning the restroom. One particular restroom in the building where my wife works, the cleaning closet for the first floor of the building is in the men's restroom and it is not uncommon for the two ladies that clean that floor to be standing 5 feet behind me chatting...it is so akward for me that I can't even accomplish what I entered the bathroom to do in the first place. Excuse me for being slightly blunt, but the first time this occured to me, I was in a small airport restroom standing at a urinal. All of a sudden, I heard this female voice standing behind me say..."buenos dias." I cannot speak for the expression that crossed my face at that moment...but I can attest to the fact that I soaked my pantlegs trying to quickly get everything tucked away. I was stunned and puzzeled and had to double check the sign on the door to make sure that I was in the right bathroom. Also, on the subject of restrooms...be prepared that some restrooms will not have toilet paper in them and you will need to travel with your own.

Traffic: The traffic has been well documented here already. My only thoughts are as follows. Cars and driving cars in Lima is a relatively new thing. As the middle class has grown, more and more ppeople in the past 10 years have purchased cars. There is somewhat the mindset that you are important or a bigshot if you have a car. On the streets of Lima, there is little respect for anyone else but yourself. There does seem to be a pecking order...with large trucks gaining the most respect, next new cars, next old cars, then taxis, then toot-toots (3-wheeled taxis), then motorcycles...and finally at the bottom of the food chain...the pedestrian. Since my my wife and I live close to her work and shopping...I fall in the last category. I again will share a personal experience that has happened to me not once but twice. As I said previously, cars (everything) take priority over pedestrians. I am walking with traffic (on the righthand sidwalk) and go to cross and intersection with a greenlight...I am one-fourth of the way into the intersection. A car approaches from behind be desiring to turn right (it is doubtful that he used his signal, but this is only from experience since I do not have eyes in the back of my head). I hear a horn honk...and I freeze in the middle of the intersection. The car turns the corner at a speed that is not appropriate for the situation, crosses the first lane and into the second lane in front of me, running over the toes on my left foot. Since I will not discuss whether I was at fault or not, because here no one cares...I can tell you what to do and not to do...first, in such a situation, do not take a step backwards, because there are times the car will try and squeeze in behind you and a step back would be directly into its path. The best thing to do is, before you cross the intersection...also look behind to see if a car looks as if may want to turn (you will have to read their mind because there is a 90% chance they will not use their signal).

Taxis: Taxis are a story in and of themselves...but the best advice is know what is the best rate is before you go because otherwise you will get the "gringo discount"...which as I have come to find out is not really a discount but about 50% higher.

Waiting in line: Lines...everywhere you turn, you have to wait in line. First, be prepared to be standing in line...probably a long line...only to have the person at the register realize he or she forgot something and leave to retrieve it. Or, to see the person at the register and the cashier just standing there doing nothing for several minutes...only to have the spouse/parent/grandparent show up with items...then continue the checkout process. Another variation of the above is to be standing in line...nearing the cash register and thinking this isn't so bad today, maybe I will be able to get home in time to watch a little American football...when all of a sudden someone shows up with two grocery carts full expecting to enter the line in front of you because their child has reserved their spot while they continued shopping. Another variation of the same is, you are standing in a long line...the person in front of you turns and mumbles something to you in their native tounge...and walks away. 10, 20, or 3o minutes later (depending on the length of the line), they return expecting to allowed to enter the line in front of you. They may have did more shopping, went to the restroom, ordered lunch or an ice cream cone...but whatever it is...the space in front of you is their divine right.

But most businesses offer faster lanes for people that are older, pregnant, handicapped or with children. This has led the motivated Limone (what I call the people in Lima) to develop ways to take advantage of this service. First, everyone with a child or grandparent drags them along so they can get in the fast lane. At SERPOST around Christmas...I have seen people borrow children from other people so they can utilize the fast lane. I have seen people in line with people so old that the elderly person has no clue to where in the hell they are at...but by god...they are in the fast lane. This was so incredible to me...I imagined it going down something like this....

Limone: "Grandpa, shut off your oxygen...we need to go buy panaton (a horrible tasting cake sold at here Christmas and Independence Day) for Christmas tomorrow.
Grandpa: "What did you say?"
Limone: "We need to buy Panaton"
Grandpa: "WHy do I need my pantalones?"
Limone: "No grandpa, I said panaton not pantolones...but you will need your pantalones also."
Grandpa: "I don't want to go if I have to wear my panatlones"
Limone: "But Christmas is tomorrow and I don't have time to wait in line...I need you to go with me....and by the way...if you wander away a get lost like you did last time...I won't have time to look for you until after Christmas."

Oh well...its crude...but you get the point.

Police: No one here respects the police or their authority. On two occasions, I have witnessed someone slapping a policeman around and no one comes to their aid. Not all police are corrupt (I think)...but that is the perception here.
bryanav
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Re: Biggest Culture Shocks?

Postby bryanav » Fri Jun 14, 2013 12:27 pm

ariel wrote:@bryanav: Finally! A relevant post after sometime. Thanks for the breath of fresh air. :)

Re 'gordita', it's another way of saying you're just different. :)

But in a similar manner as far as culture, my jaw literally dropped the first time I heard someone being called "negra" on live TV. My wife quickly explained to me that it didn't mean anything other than as a term of endearment. They also use 'chino' (not necessarily Chinese, e.g. Fujimori was called 'chino' by those who somehow found him 'endearing'), 'cholo', 'serrano', 'charapa', etc.


LOL one time I was with some friends and a really tall guy walked by. (by tall, I mean.. like 5'8 LOL) and one of my friends called him a light stealer. Whaaaa? He said that it was because hes tall enough to steal the light bulbs.
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ariel
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Re: Biggest Culture Shocks?

Postby ariel » Fri Jun 14, 2013 12:38 pm

bryanav wrote:LOL one time I was with some friends and a really tall guy walked by. (by tall, I mean.. like 5'8 LOL) and one of my friends called him a light stealer. Whaaaa? He said that it was because hes tall enough to steal the light bulbs.


roba foco :mrgreen:
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Re: Biggest Culture Shocks?

Postby falconagain » Mon Jun 17, 2013 12:46 am

Hitoruna wrote:
falconagain wrote:
chante wrote:I think most of the health issues listed are not a major concern living in the "expat" area in Lima, nor in Arequipa where I live, except for the water which I don't drink. Many of the other issues are from the jungle or other remote areas.


Actually the mentioned diseases are present in all cities within Peru. There is several areas of
Lima that are as polluted as la Oroya (The dirtiest place in Peru, and one of the dirtiest in the world). I could try to list the places of all cities that are currently known but the problem is that there is not enough space to post all that information. Also people need to understand that the bacteria that
causes these diseases is carried by the people from the provinces to the capital and other cities.
The people with the worst sickness are isolated by the health department in certain areas of Lima.

Up to the year 2000, Tubercolosis was very common in Lima, and expensive for the State to cure
due to the fact that the infected people already self medicated themselves. Fortunately the new
governments of Toledo, Garcia and Humala decided to outlaw the sale of all Anti Tubercolosis
medication in Lima in order to avoid the excessive costs to the government. Now most of these
people of the provinces die because they cannot pay for the medication and the government
does not supply free help anymore. It was something fair and just because these people were
very irresponsible and infected others within the city. Now the sickness runs its course and kills
them before they cause any trouble to other. Justice and Fairness in Peru.


Yes, "menos indios", right?

too bad some of us survived and led pretty good lives :lol:


Actually what they did is reallocate the budget used on that one person to 100 or more.
Or using your language: Se sacrifico a una persona inutil para ayudar a 100 o mas necesitados.
(One useless person was sacrificed to help 100 or more needy people irregardless of color).
Es decir se salvaron 100 o mas personas de todas las razas a expensas de un parasito social.
That is truly fairness even if it was Toledo, Humala or Alan Garcia who started that policy.
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Re: Biggest Culture Shocks?

Postby KenBE » Sun Jun 23, 2013 2:40 pm

bryanav wrote:In regards to biggest culture shocks:


3) Hola Gordita!! I am overweight (and I was alot heavier when I was there. I lost 50lbs while I was there!) and when I would walk down the street, everyone would greet me, "Hola gordita!" Some people would flat out ask me why I was so fat. When I lost the weight some people would just call me little white girl. I was surprised at how peruvians take the most obvious thing about you and call you that- and mean no harm whatsoever.


LOL! This is so true. Peruvians are obsessed with weight. If you are even slightly overweight or too thin almost EVERYONE you meet will tell you! Also if you have relatively pale skin (like me) you will get endless comments on how you need to "get some sun, urgently" or "drink your Coca Cola".

Other unpleasant culture shocks:

-People cutting in line and pushing you out of the way
-People always checking for counterfeit bills
-Lots of men who think it is ok to hit their wives/girlfriends and cheat on them
-Having to bring your own toilet paper everywhere
-Mothers who treat their adult daughters like little kids
-Epidemic crime, getting robbed and mugged is a normal part of everyday life.
-Everyone drinking from a single glass at parties!!!!

However, despite all of this I still love Peru and I miss it now that I'm not there anymore.

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