Respecting ones native country

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caliguy
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Respecting ones native country

Postby caliguy » Wed Sep 11, 2013 2:36 pm

What does it actually mean when you see a bumper sticker on someones car that says: “Te Amo (fill in the country)”.
Respecting ones country is to show respect and compassion for its beauty and natural resources. How many times have you walked into a public restrooom only to find wáter leaking at one of the fixtures? You tell the business owner, who just shrugs it off. How about standing on a street corner when a bus pulls up, and out the window comes a half eaten papa rellena con salsa criolla on a styrofoam plate, and lands upside down at your feet. Yes, i know, someone will pick it up. Thats not the point.
Last year i was travelling by colectvo through a beautiful remote región near Equador. We were all eating in the van, when i decided to pass a bag around to collect all the trash. It went from one person to the next, all putting their trash in the bag. To my amazemenet, the last person to put their trash in the bag,(Ecuadorian), used both hands to forcé it out of a partially opened window! It reminded me of the old t.v. advertisement with the Indian with a tear in his eye.
Getting back to the bumper sticker, is there a hidden message in that phrase?
Here is a link to the old Indian ad. Some of you may get a tear in your eye.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1BmrlV49nwI


every place has it's own spirit. you just need to tune into it.
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sbaustin
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Re: Respecting ones native country

Postby sbaustin » Wed Sep 11, 2013 3:18 pm

I'm not sure loving one's country and respecting it are the same thing.
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windsportinperu
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Re: Respecting ones native country

Postby windsportinperu » Wed Sep 11, 2013 3:48 pm

caliguy wrote: Getting back to the bumper sticker, is there a hidden message in that phrase?


For me the guy who put on a bumper sticker in his car probably love his country, but also needs a lot of education at the moment of throwing a piece of paper through the window..

While traveling through small towns in the highlands I saw a lot - I mean a lot - of bathroom with running tap water in place where it is supposed that the people is poor to waste water in that way. After talking with the owner, discovered that they don't have a water measuring device - water meter. So they just pay a fix amount of money, incredibly 8 soles or less.. and they consume several times the water I consume at home.. They really don't care about it..
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chi chi
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Re: Respecting ones native country

Postby chi chi » Wed Sep 11, 2013 3:59 pm

windsportinperu wrote:After talking with the owner, discovered that they don't have a water measuring device - water meter. So they just pay a fix amount of money, incredibly 8 soles or less.. and they consume several times the water I consume at home.. They really don't care about it..


Most homes in Peru don't have a water meter so people can use as much water as they want for a fixed price.

I pay 24.50 soles a month. I am trying to figure out how much I would pay if I have a water meter.
argidd
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Re: Respecting ones native country

Postby argidd » Wed Sep 11, 2013 4:20 pm

I agree with you guys, for living in a country where it is partly desert, we have absolutely NO water usage education. Even for those living in non-desert areas, it is crucial, especially in times where water is becoming scarce. It is such a shame.
Regards,

Argidd
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miaperu
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Re: Respecting ones native country

Postby miaperu » Wed Sep 11, 2013 5:04 pm

The local council have built new concrete waste bins bolted to the ground so that they won't be stolen and used as plantpots! However locals still go out of their way to throw their trash anywhere except in the bin, to the point of going out of their way to dispose of it right outside the neighbours door so that you are welcomed home by fishy plastic bag.

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