Professional people are leaving Lima in droves.

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chi chi
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Professional people are leaving Lima in droves.

Postby chi chi » Thu Sep 26, 2013 12:10 pm

I noticed that in the last few years, many professionals and business people moved to Tarapoto and other places in the provinces.

In the condominium where I live, a large number of the homes are bought by Limeños. Mostly doctors, engineers, government employees, business people.

Most of them give as reason that they are fed up with the soaring crime in Lima, high prices and constant fear of being a victim of a crime. Also the traffic, contamination and dirty streets made them decide to leave Lima.

But Lima is growing. The poor and mostly un-skilled and poorly educated are flocking to Lima. There are much more land invasions around Lima and shantytowns are popping up like mushrooms. Getting a job is difficult and most jobs are very low paid.
For many of those people, stealing, begging, extorting are the only ways left to make a living.


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Re: Professional people are leaving Lima in droves.

Postby simperu2012 » Thu Sep 26, 2013 12:24 pm

You're right, Chi Chi. When my girlfriend and I lived in Trujillo, we met a lot of health professionals from Lima. The middle class was actually growing very quickly in Trujillo from what we could see. There are a lot more stores and areas that cater to this new demographic of people from Lima. The sad truth is, according to my girlfriend's grandfather, that Lima once was a very nice place to be. He said up until the mid 80's, wages were still fairly competitive, and most districts hadn't become overpopulated. Districts like Chorrillos have really been hit bad by people illegally moving onto land. I think one solution to improving not only Lima but the entire country is to make education affordable for everyone. When someone is uneducated, it's very difficult to make any progress in the workplace. I've seen it and experienced it in Lima.
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Re: Professional people are leaving Lima in droves.

Postby KenBE » Thu Sep 26, 2013 4:53 pm

simperu2012 wrote:You're right, Chi Chi. When my girlfriend and I lived in Trujillo, we met a lot of health professionals from Lima. The middle class was actually growing very quickly in Trujillo from what we could see. There are a lot more stores and areas that cater to this new demographic of people from Lima. The sad truth is, according to my girlfriend's grandfather, that Lima once was a very nice place to be. He said up until the mid 80's, wages were still fairly competitive, and most districts hadn't become overpopulated. Districts like Chorrillos have really been hit bad by people illegally moving onto land. I think one solution to improving not only Lima but the entire country is to make education affordable for everyone. When someone is uneducated, it's very difficult to make any progress in the workplace. I've seen it and experienced it in Lima.


If people are moving to Trujillo because they think it is safer than Lima they will be very disappointed...
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Re: Professional people are leaving Lima in droves.

Postby simperu2012 » Thu Sep 26, 2013 6:17 pm

There's still less crime than Lima in Trujillo, both by number and percentage.There's also less pollution, congestion, and the beaches are cleaner.
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Re: Professional people are leaving Lima in droves.

Postby KenBE » Thu Sep 26, 2013 7:04 pm

simperu2012 wrote:There's still less crime than Lima in Trujillo, both by number and percentage.There's also less pollution, congestion, and the beaches are cleaner.

Well, it is a smaller city, so yeah their will be less crime by number, but I'm not sure about percentages. Trujillo is a VERY high crime city. I spent 4 years there and I witnessed several armed muggings and robberies. My Peruvian ex novia was express kindapped there in February. I am pretty sure Miraflores and other wealthy areas of Lima are a little safer than most of Trujillo (except maybe for Huanchaco, which is pretty safe).
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Re: Professional people are leaving Lima in droves.

Postby Alpineprince » Thu Sep 26, 2013 10:10 pm

If you stand on the overpass by Panamerica Sur on a friday night, you can see all of the Mercedes and BMW's (luggage strapped on top)lined up fighting there way out of Lima. They are either "moving in droves" to Tarapota like chichi sez or they are going to the beach in Asia for the weekend! :)
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Re: Professional people are leaving Lima in droves.

Postby argidd » Fri Sep 27, 2013 9:58 am

Alpineprince wrote:If you stand on the overpass by Panamerica Sur on a friday night, you can see all of the Mercedes and BMW's (luggage strapped on top)lined up fighting there way out of Lima. They are either "moving in droves" to Tarapota like chichi sez or they are going to the beach in Asia for the weekend! :)


Haha, good one!
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Re: Professional people are leaving Lima in droves.

Postby 28 de julio » Fri Sep 27, 2013 12:32 pm

Miraflores is just empty these days, like a ghost town, with every other window displaying a sign saying "gone to Tarapoto to start a new life" away from the crime and the smog. I suppose that's why the prices have risen so much, not because demand is high, but because everyone's moved to Tarapoto.
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Re: Professional people are leaving Lima in droves.

Postby TShadow » Fri Sep 27, 2013 4:05 pm

Miraflores is just empty these days, like a ghost town, with every other window displaying a sign saying "gone to Tarapoto to start a new life" away from the crime and the smog. I suppose that's why the prices have risen so much, not because demand is high, but because everyone's moved to Tarapoto.


Ha ha, good one. Yeah soon Tarapoto will have grown like Lima. Wonder then what place chi chi will advertise.
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Re: Professional people are leaving Lima in droves.

Postby gringito » Sun Sep 29, 2013 10:20 pm

In the provinces the people fear that building a new rural road will only bring criminals to their town.
Surely Tarapoto has no such roads...
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Re: Professional people are leaving Lima in droves.

Postby tupacperu » Mon Sep 30, 2013 8:53 am

chi chi wrote:I noticed that in the last few years, many professionals and business people moved to Tarapoto and other places in the provinces.

In the condominium where I live, a large number of the homes are bought by Limeños. Mostly doctors, engineers, government employees, business people.

Most of them give as reason that they are fed up with the soaring crime in Lima, high prices and constant fear of being a victim of a crime. Also the traffic, contamination and dirty streets made them decide to leave Lima.

But Lima is growing. The poor and mostly un-skilled and poorly educated are flocking to Lima. There are much more land invasions around Lima and shantytowns are popping up like mushrooms. Getting a job is difficult and most jobs are very low paid.
For many of those people, stealing, begging, extorting are the only ways left to make a living.


Seem there is hard evidence of this migration recently.... viewtopic.php?f=15&t=23494
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Re: Professional people are leaving Lima in droves.

Postby tupacperu » Mon Sep 30, 2013 9:05 am

KenBE wrote:
simperu2012 wrote:There's still less crime than Lima in Trujillo, both by number and percentage.There's also less pollution, congestion, and the beaches are cleaner.

Well, it is a smaller city, so yeah their will be less crime by number, but I'm not sure about percentages. Trujillo is a VERY high crime city. I spent 4 years there and I witnessed several armed muggings and robberies. My Peruvian ex novia was express kindapped there in February. I am pretty sure Miraflores and other wealthy areas of Lima are a little safer than most of Trujillo (except maybe for Huanchaco, which is pretty safe).


Miraflores SAFER? Thieves go where the money is. That is unless you frequent LA Victoria or other impoverished neighborhoods. Lived in Magdalena, Pueblo Libre, middle income areas, no issues. When I moved to Miraflores, neighbors complained about frequent break-ins, home invasions. In the tourist areas, like Pizza Alley a tourist was wacked across the knees with an iron bar, then thieves rifled through his pockets and took everything. Tourist being robbed is a common occurrence and is not always news headlines. Even in the expensive Hotels, major stars have been robbed or burglarized. I want an Apartment in Lima as an investment or stop-over on my way to Pimentel. but would not live in Lima for extended periods of time, especially with the overcast, a gloomy place, and moisture ruining my clothes..lol
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Re: Professional people are leaving Lima in droves.

Postby tupacperu » Mon Sep 30, 2013 9:15 am

Alpineprince wrote:If you stand on the overpass by Panamerica Sur on a friday night, you can see all of the Mercedes and BMW's (luggage strapped on top)lined up fighting there way out of Lima. They are either "moving in droves" to Tarapota like chichi sez or they are going to the beach in Asia for the weekend! :)


Go to the Bus Terminal Oltursa (first Class Buses) on Friday/Saturday. Everyone is heading out of town and paying a premium to do so. I have taken that trip many times over the years before we moved to Pimentel. Most times they are booked solid, PanAmerican north. The logical progression is to leave Lima, because of cost, especially office rentals or purchases. If your company does not require a physical office presence, the logical thing is to move where there is savings. The trend in recent years is work from home. I would not be surprised if there is an office exodus out of Lima. or executives living in the provinces flying in for business meetings. It happens in NY and LA (commuter planes). I have done that working from home for IBM in the USA. I'd fly out to a client site when needed, but worked mostly from email and home office. it is a money saving trend.

Asia, forget it.. if you haven't bought a beach house by now , they will cost you more than an apartment in Lima/Miraflores.
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Re: Professional people are leaving Lima in droves.

Postby chi chi » Mon Sep 30, 2013 11:24 am

tupacperu wrote:Miraflores SAFER? Thieves go where the money is. That is unless you frequent LA Victoria or other impoverished neighborhoods. Lived in Magdalena, Pueblo Libre, middle income areas, no issues. When I moved to Miraflores, neighbors complained about frequent break-ins, home invasions. In the tourist areas, like Pizza Alley a tourist was wacked across the knees with an iron bar, then thieves rifled through his pockets and took everything. Tourist being robbed is a common occurrence and is not always news headlines. Even in the expensive Hotels, major stars have been robbed or burglarized.


I think that the local authorities in Miraflores made some kind of deal with the press to not write or very rarely report about crimes that happen in Miraflores. Just to keep up it's reputation of a so called safe district and keep the prices of properties and hotels high.
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Re: Professional people are leaving Lima in droves.

Postby KenBE » Mon Sep 30, 2013 1:25 pm

tupacperu wrote:
KenBE wrote:
simperu2012 wrote:There's still less crime than Lima in Trujillo, both by number and percentage.There's also less pollution, congestion, and the beaches are cleaner.

Well, it is a smaller city, so yeah their will be less crime by number, but I'm not sure about percentages. Trujillo is a VERY high crime city. I spent 4 years there and I witnessed several armed muggings and robberies. My Peruvian ex novia was express kindapped there in February. I am pretty sure Miraflores and other wealthy areas of Lima are a little safer than most of Trujillo (except maybe for Huanchaco, which is pretty safe).


Miraflores SAFER? Thieves go where the money is. That is unless you frequent LA Victoria or other impoverished neighborhoods. Lived in Magdalena, Pueblo Libre, middle income areas, no issues. When I moved to Miraflores, neighbors complained about frequent break-ins, home invasions. In the tourist areas, like Pizza Alley a tourist was wacked across the knees with an iron bar, then thieves rifled through his pockets and took everything. Tourist being robbed is a common occurrence and is not always news headlines. Even in the expensive Hotels, major stars have been robbed or burglarized. I want an Apartment in Lima as an investment or stop-over on my way to Pimentel. but would not live in Lima for extended periods of time, especially with the overcast, a gloomy place, and moisture ruining my clothes..lol


Well, I say this purely based on the impression I got the few times I went to Miraflores and also on what people on this forum say. I have never spent much time anywhere in Lima, so I can't really say for sure.

What I do know is that the middle class areas of Trujillo have A LOT of crime. For anyone who knows Trujillo, I lived in Santa Ines, near the Aventura Plaza mall. People and businesses where constantly robbed there.

Do the thieves only go where the money is? Not in Peru. There are choros EVERYWHERE, from the poorest pueblos jovenes to the zonas fichas like Miraflores (apparently).
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Re: Professional people are leaving Lima in droves.

Postby Bobby » Mon Sep 30, 2013 2:30 pm

Living in Miraflores since 2006 never had any trouble. As it is a touristic district of course you might have records for pickpockets and similar crimes in some specific and comercial areas. Considering absolute and relative values I would guess Miraflores is one of the safest places in Lima.
I would add what is annoying about Miraflores is that I feel like Orwell's 1984: too many cameras, too many serenazgo, and too many fiscalizadores.

As Lima is the only hinterland in Peru (main airport, main harbour, main roads nods) I really doubt prof people are leaving Lima. As other poster have said, provinces lack of infrastructure good schools, good universities, good hospitals, etc. Trujillo and Arequipa are too small compared to Lima.

That's not the case of other regional countries. In Colombia you can choose between Bogota, Cali,and Medellin.
In Argentina you can choose between Buenos Aires, Cordoba, Rosario. In Brazil , Rio, SP, BH.
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Re: Professional people are leaving Lima in droves.

Postby argidd » Mon Sep 30, 2013 3:07 pm

I lived in Surco for 15 years, Ica 2.5 (whilst also in Surco, since I came back on weekends) and now Miraflores for 7 months.
Ica and Miraflores are incomparable, Ica is too low in the scale.
I lived in Las Gardenias, a nice part of Surco, and then we moved to the heart of Miraflores. We walk to the Larco/Benavides area, and to and from Larcomar/British Embassy and have no issues. Yes, Lima is a dangerous area, and muggings and even violent crimes occur everywhere. But one thing I've noticed from fellow Miraflorinos is that usually robbery at gun point happens around midnight or later, on weekdays and in quite streets, or streets close to big Access ways (like close to Via Expresa), or on the limits (like the limit with Surquillo). As long as you are careful and go through the more transited áreas, you feel rather safe; which I can't say for anywhere else in Lima (except San Isidro, maybe).

Miraflores and San Isidro have so much to offer, we only move for VERY special occassions. Saturday we went to a wedding, and last time I was in La Molina, it was 6 months ago!
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Re: Professional people are leaving Lima in droves.

Postby TShadow » Tue Oct 01, 2013 3:35 pm

Well La Molina, at least the residential area around La Molina Plaza is really another Lima. Clean, people are more educated, no chaos, very safe area, even at night. As soon as I pass the cerro I'm entering into another country.
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Re: Professional people are leaving Lima in droves.

Postby tupacperu » Sun Oct 06, 2013 11:15 pm

I don't know if we read the same newspaper: yesterday: A criminal organization composed of Colombians would be that, in recent months, has robbed at least 15 money changers in Lima, of which four have been killed. The last of the robberies of these offenders took place yesterday morning in the heart of Miraflores.

http://peru21.pe/actualidad/colombianos ... as-2152224

Man robbed of thousands of soles in the door of his home. Miraflores
http://youtu.be/A2u_SJYBRSo



Frequently you hear about assasinations in Miraflores. Many involving Colombians.

The "Angry Birds" gang stole 45 thousand soles in Miraflores
Wednesday, September 11, 2013 | 10:03 am
http://www.larepublica.pe/11-09-2013/ba ... miraflores

Vicious Jewelry Store Robbery in Miraflores
http://youtu.be/woYz2s6qbQg

Headlines: Comensal denuncia robo dentro de un KFC en Miraflores | El ...
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elcomercio.pe/.../noti...
Jan 22, 2012
Reportan asalto a cambistas en Miraflores | LaRepublica.pe
► 2:58► 2:58
http://www.larepublica.pe/...
Jul 13, 2013
Falleció cambista asaltado esta tarde en Miraflores - La ...
► 2:04► 2:04
http://www.larepublica.pe/...
May 21, 2013
Miraflores: cámaras captaron a delincuentes en asalto a hotel ...
► 1:49► 1:49
http://www.youtube.com/w...
Jan 25, 2013
Hallan muerto a español en Miraflores - Actualidad | Perú 21
► 0:56► 0:56
peru21.pe/.../hallan-...
Feb 3, 2012
Dos muertos deja frustrado asalto en Miraflores | Actualidad ...
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http://www.tuteve.tv/.../dos...
Feb 15, 2012
Robo en oficina de LAN en Miraflores - Actualidad | Perú 21
► 1:13► 1:13
peru21.pe/.../asaltan-...
Sep 15, 2012
Last edited by tupacperu on Sun Oct 06, 2013 11:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Professional people are leaving Lima in droves.

Postby tupacperu » Sun Oct 06, 2013 11:35 pm

People associate tourist area with safety, this is where criminals look to score on unaware tourists.
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Re: Professional people are leaving Lima in droves.

Postby KenBE » Mon Oct 07, 2013 1:59 pm

Wow, well I guess Miraflores is more dangerous than I thought. But these crimes happen just as often or probably even more in poorer areas as well. In fact, I think that in general the poor get robbed more often than the rich. As long as you have anything of value, even if it is just something like a cell phone, you are a potential target in Peru. The Peruvian government really needs to wake up, because crime is getting completely out of hand.

Also, why do these Colombians come to Peru to rob? Is it that it is harder to commit these crimes in Colombia (better police?)? Or is it just that there is more money in Peru?
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Re: Professional people are leaving Lima in droves.

Postby argidd » Mon Oct 07, 2013 2:18 pm

KenBE wrote:Wow, well I guess Miraflores is more dangerous than I thought. But these crimes happen just as often or probably even more in poorer areas as well. In fact, I think that in general the poor get robbed more often than the rich. As long as you have anything of value, even if it is just something like a cell phone, you are a potential target in Peru. The Peruvian government really needs to wake up, because crime is getting completely out of hand.

Also, why do these Colombians come to Peru to rob? Is it that it is harder to commit these crimes in Colombia (better police?)? Or is it just that there is more money in Peru?


Perhaps the hitman market is saturated in Colombia?
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Re: Professional people are leaving Lima in droves.

Postby chi chi » Mon Oct 07, 2013 2:37 pm

tupacperu wrote:People associate tourist area with safety, this is where criminals look to score on unaware tourists.

The last of the robberies of these offenders took place yesterday morning in the heart of Miraflores.
[/quote]

Prices of food, housing and other basic needs are increasing rapidly and people will have to rob and steal to make ends meet. And Miraflores is a good place to go for that. People who live in Miraflores will rarely resist during a robbery and they hand over there valuables quickly and without hassle for the robber.

Also, there are always 'marcas' hanging around the banks and exchange offices in Miraflores that will rob anyone that has withdrawn a large amount of cash. Often the bank employees are involved.
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Re: Professional people are leaving Lima in droves.

Postby 28 de julio » Mon Oct 07, 2013 2:45 pm

KenBE wrote:Wow, well I guess Miraflores is more dangerous than I thought. But these crimes happen just as often or probably even more in poorer areas as well. In fact, I think that in general the poor get robbed more often than the rich. As long as you have anything of value, even if it is just something like a cell phone, you are a potential target in Peru. The Peruvian government really needs to wake up, because crime is getting completely out of hand.

Also, why do these Colombians come to Peru to rob? Is it that it is harder to commit these crimes in Colombia (better police?)? Or is it just that there is more money in Peru?


Your first instinct was right, Ken, there isn't a lot of crime in Mirafloes and I agree that the poor get robbed more than the rich, because in poorer suburbs they don't have the money to pay for watchmen in their streets, better security for their homes, porters in their building or pay higher taxes to have lots of Serenazgo patrolling the streets.

Most crime in Peru is opportunistic, so where there is poor security, less people on the streets, less police, less guardias, that's where you'll find crime happening. While Miraflores might attract more professional criminals after bigger rewards, these criminals are not going to put themselves in a situation that could put them in prison. Street crime which is recorded by cameras and seen by guardias and Serenazgo is relatively rare as the risks outweigh the potential rewards. So robbing people on street corners where they can be easily identified by watchmen, Serenezgo, residents, families rarely happens.

The people most at risk in Miraflores are people that get drunk around the Parque Kennedy area, especially at night, those who don't take the normal precautions of being aware of surroundings and not carrying too many valuables and those who are in the street with lots of money, like the post about money changers being robbed. For some criminals, the risk is worth taking, a few thousand dollars can be had with the right planning, but why risk jail to rob a tourist of a few hundred soles.

In the three years I've lived in Miraflores, I've never once had a problem, seen a problem - apart from people jumping out of cars and shouting at each other and friends having their cars broken into in streets where there are no cuidadores or watchmen. I'm not saying crime doesn't happen here, but if you take normal precautions in Miraflores, it's one of the safest parts of Lima and safer than most other big cities in the Americas, and on the whole you're very unlikely to be a victim of crime in Miraflores.

Of course rogue taxi drivers are also a danger, but that's a city-wide problem. The other crime that's worth watching out for is when you see two men on a motorbike. They're looking to do a smash and grab if they see valuables in cars at traffic lights, for examples, or wealthy looking pedestrians in the street. Again this is a Lima wide problem and not specific to Miraflores.
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Re: Professional people are leaving Lima in droves.

Postby KenBE » Mon Oct 07, 2013 2:49 pm

chi chi wrote:
Also, there are always 'marcas' hanging around the banks and exchange offices in Miraflores that will rob anyone that has withdrawn a large amount of cash. Often the bank employees are involved.


This doesn't just happen in Miralfores. It is extremely common everywhere in Peru.
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Re: Professional people are leaving Lima in droves.

Postby victmanu » Mon Oct 07, 2013 2:52 pm

tupacperu wrote:I don't know if we read the same newspaper: yesterday: A criminal organization composed of Colombians would be that, in recent months, has robbed at least 15 money changers in Lima, of which four have been killed. The last of the robberies of these offenders took place yesterday morning in the heart of Miraflores.


Hallan muerto a español en Miraflores - Actualidad | Perú 21
► 0:56► 0:56
peru21.pe/.../hallan-...
Feb 3, 2012


The spaniard died because an overdose of drugs and alcohol. Not so honest dude.
http://peru21.pe/2012/02/03/actualidad/ ... es-2010315
Un ciudadano español fue hallado muerto esta madrugada en la habitación de un hotel en el que se hospedaba desde hace una semana, en el distrito de Miraflores.

José Montero López (45) habría fallecido a causa de un suicidio involuntario, según una investigación preliminar de la Policía. El personal de limpieza encontró su cuerpo en la ducha de su cuarto, desnudo y sin heridas o marcas de agresión, informó RPP Noticias.
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Re: Professional people are leaving Lima in droves.

Postby 28 de julio » Mon Oct 07, 2013 2:57 pm

victmanu wrote:
tupacperu wrote:I don't know if we read the same newspaper: yesterday: A criminal organization composed of Colombians would be that, in recent months, has robbed at least 15 money changers in Lima, of which four have been killed. The last of the robberies of these offenders took place yesterday morning in the heart of Miraflores.


Hallan muerto a español en Miraflores - Actualidad | Perú 21
► 0:56► 0:56
peru21.pe/.../hallan-...
Feb 3, 2012


The spaniard died because an overdose of drugs and alcohol. Not so honest dude.
http://peru21.pe/2012/02/03/actualidad/ ... es-2010315
Un ciudadano español fue hallado muerto esta madrugada en la habitación de un hotel en el que se hospedaba desde hace una semana, en el distrito de Miraflores.

José Montero López (45) habría fallecido a causa de un suicidio involuntario, según una investigación preliminar de la Policía. El personal de limpieza encontró su cuerpo en la ducha de su cuarto, desnudo y sin heridas o marcas de agresión, informó RPP Noticias.


Well spotted. I also noticed that the list of crimes was over the space of a year. In an area like La Victoria, that list of crimes is what happens in an afternoon. Also most of the crimes were higher profile, like robbing hotels and money changers, rather than simple street crimes, robbing residents and tourists. Money changers are a good target because they carry so much money and wherever they are in Lima they're at risk. The same with marcas and watching banks for people taking out large amounts of money. It's a Lima-wide problem.
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Re: Professional people are leaving Lima in droves.

Postby chi chi » Mon Oct 07, 2013 3:05 pm

I think that cambista is one of the most dangerous jobs in Peru. They can't protect themselves against robbers. They are flashing a large bunch of money on the street whilst everybody can see it. They are just like a magnet for robbers.

When I walk around the Plaza in Tarapoto, those moneychangers are flashing a large pack of money in front of my face whilst yelling; ''Mister, dollares? euros?''

What I can't understand, is that I often read in the newspapers that people got robbed of tens of thousands of soles or even hundred of thousand of soles. Why does anyone needs so much money in cash?

I personnaly prefer to pay everything in cash as it's more convenient. But I won't pay cash for something that costs thousands of soles. I will pay via banktranfer. It's safer too and you have proof of payment.
28 de julio
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Re: Professional people are leaving Lima in droves.

Postby 28 de julio » Mon Oct 07, 2013 3:12 pm

chi chi wrote:I think that cambista is one of the most dangerous jobs in Peru. They can't protect themselves against robbers. They are flashing a large bunch of money on the street whilst everybody can see it. They are just like a magnet for robbers.

When I walk around the Plaza in Tarapoto, those moneychangers are flashing a large pack of money in front of my face whilst yelling; ''Mister, dollares? euros?''

What I can't understand, is that I often read in the newspapers that people got robbed of tens of thousands of soles or even hundred of thousand of soles. Why does anyone needs so much money in cash?

I personnaly prefer to pay everything in cash as it's more convenient. But I won't pay cash for something that costs thousands of soles. I will pay via banktranfer. It's safer too and you have proof of payment.


Yeah, completely agree, these guys are doing a risky job. My guess why ordinary people have so much cash - although I'm not 100% sure - is because their job or business deals in cash hand and they don't want the government to see their real incomes. I have several friends who supplement their legal declared income with cash-in-hand.

On the subject of using a credit card to pay for smaller purchases in Peru, I do it as my card charges me no fees for buying things in Peru and the rate of interest is quite good.
Last edited by 28 de julio on Mon Oct 07, 2013 3:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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chi chi
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Re: Professional people are leaving Lima in droves.

Postby chi chi » Mon Oct 07, 2013 3:22 pm

I have a Visa debit card. I think it's much better than a Visa credit card. If you pay with debit card, you don't pay interest and the money get deducted from your account immediatelly. Neither do you get monthly bills and you don't have to worry about the expiry date of the bill.
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Re: Professional people are leaving Lima in droves.

Postby 28 de julio » Mon Oct 07, 2013 3:24 pm

chi chi wrote:I have a Visa debit card. I think it's much better than a Visa credit card. If you pay with debit card, you don't pay interest and the money get deducted from your account immediatelly. Neither do you get monthly bills and you don't have to worry about the expiry date of the bill.


Is it a visa debit card from a Peruvian bank? I used my Visa debit card once here and got charged a whopping £4 for buying something that cost about the same. Never again. I notice my bank only charges me interest if I don't pay the bill in full at the end of the month, so if I buy something on the credit card at the start of the month, I have almost eight weeks before I have to pay the bill, but I agree it's easy to run up debts if you're not careful.
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Re: Professional people are leaving Lima in droves.

Postby argidd » Mon Oct 07, 2013 4:10 pm

I can't open a few of Tupac's links; but when you analyze crime in Peru, you have to look at it from all perspectives.

For example... Colombian citizen shot in the head by a passerby, it was a "payback" hit. Some people being shot at a Restaurant in La Paz, I believe it too was a hit. Man shot in a Notaría and got 100k soles (or some similar amount), it ended up being staged by him (WTF?!!!)

I think we all agree that Lima, and for all it's worth, Peru are dangerous, but there are certain parts of town that for one reason or another, make you feel safer.
For example, if you look at Barranco, it is so unfortunate that pubs and little restaurants have been the target of armed robberies, they have a Facebook page where they alert citizens of the latest events of that sort. Now it is difficult to feel safe knowing all these horrible things occur on a daily basis.
Regards,

Argidd

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