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Learning to love lima

Posted: Fri Oct 11, 2013 11:38 am
by nube
I've just got here with my little Family for work and I just don't get it. I was sold the job with lots of positives but I can't see it now I'm here. Please fill me in on what I'm missing so I don't pack up and go home. I don't mean to be negative I just feel like I must be missing something?

Re: Learning to love lima

Posted: Fri Oct 11, 2013 12:24 pm
by argidd
Wow, that is a complex question to respond... especially not having any information about you.

So I can tell you a little about what I like to enjoy (I am a woman, Peruvian,married (to an expat), no kids). I work in San Isidro, and live in Miraflores.

On weekends we go out jogging along the sea front, Our route usually changes depending on what mood we are in, whethere going into a Park, going down to the actual sea front, going down Kennedy Park where there are more joggers... etc. I try to go to the farmer's market every Saturday and/or Sunday. . I mostly cook at home and try to experiment with local ingredients, but keep an open mind to international cuisine, including of course, British cooking. Some weekdays we go to the cinema at Larcomar, or Ovalo Gutiérrez, and then go for a meal, we really enjoy the variety of food options we have. We like doing all sorts of things for entertainment... like: theatre, museums, fairs, etc. I look for events that promote Peruvian culture so my husband (and me too) keeps in touch with something outside our "European-ish" lifestyle. For example, 2 weeks ago we went to expo-café, and last weekend we went to a food fair from Puno. When we can, we walk places (like our grocery shopping weekly trip), so we avoid taxis or buses (neither of us want to drive). My husband believes he needs a break from Lima every so often, so, in this past year, we've taken a couple short trips.

It is possible you are going through an adaptation stage, I would encourage you to try to find things you normally enjoy to do, and see if you can do them here. If you feel really miserable, then speak to your family, see how they feel, and consider talking to your employer. Definitely Lima is not for everyone, and even us, Limeneans get irritated at certain things.

Email me if you would like to chat any further...

Re: Learning to love lima

Posted: Fri Oct 11, 2013 12:43 pm
by mammamia
nube wrote:I've just got here with my little Family for work and I just don't get it. I was sold the job with lots of positives but I can't see it now I'm here. Please fill me in on what I'm missing so I don't pack up and go home. I don't mean to be negative I just feel like I must be missing something?

Lima is a tough city to live in. When I first came to Peru I lived there for some time and, thank God, I had a chance to move to a provincial city, otherwise, I would have left Peru forever.

My advice is if you can't take it leave the city now or it will only get worse. You have to be born there to feel OK in Lima, at least, I feel that way and I can compare Lima with other capital cities because for the last 15 years I have lived in many places on every continent.

Re: Learning to love lima

Posted: Fri Oct 11, 2013 1:02 pm
by crazytacoperu.com
nube wrote:I've just got here with my little Family for work and I just don't get it. I was sold the job with lots of positives but I can't see it now I'm here. Please fill me in on what I'm missing so I don't pack up and go home. I don't mean to be negative I just feel like I must be missing something?


The weather is tough in the winter, so on the weekends I go to Cieneguilla. Its only about 3 soles anywhere from Javier Prado. You find a restaurant campestre and eat, take the family and enjoy the sun. Many hotels are reasonably priced. It's almost always sunny in Cieneguilla and it is close. Don't go to Chosica, the traffic is horrible you will add an extra hour just waiting.

Re: Learning to love lima

Posted: Fri Oct 11, 2013 1:34 pm
by nube
Thanks for your response. It's made me feel a bit better already. Will definitely try oit some of your suggestions.
Argid my children are very young which I think is a big part of the problem. I feel as though they are so constrained here with little opportunity for them to run free while we all relax. I'm finding it quite isolated myself as going out is such hard work ...even trying to push a buggy along the street is a challenge

Re: Learning to love lima

Posted: Fri Oct 11, 2013 1:41 pm
by BellbottomBlues
My boyfriend lived most of his life in Lima and now 3 years here in the US. He loves Peru, but doesn't seem anxious to move back there - only anxious to visit.

I think we open our eyes quite a bit when we try adapt to other cultures.

Many here have advised me not to judge all of Peru by Limeno standards.


BBB

Re: Learning to love lima

Posted: Fri Oct 11, 2013 2:22 pm
by argidd
nube wrote:Thanks for your response. It's made me feel a bit better already. Will definitely try oit some of your suggestions.
Argid my children are very young which I think is a big part of the problem. I feel as though they are so constrained here with little opportunity for them to run free while we all relax. I'm finding it quite isolated myself as going out is such hard work ...even trying to push a buggy along the street is a challenge


Nube, I know that can be a challenge, depending on your location!
If you live in Miraflores, or have the opportunity to take a drive down there, there are a couple parks that have a lot of space for kids to run around/socialize, and they have the Little tykes type houses (not sure how to categorize them in Eng!), anyway, a lot of space. If you are closer to the Surco área, el Parque de la Amistad (Benavides/Caminos del Inca) could do as well. If posible ($$$) I suggest you join a club like Terrazas, Golf los Inkas, Jockey Club, they have big play áreas, and are safe to walk inside.

Re: Learning to love lima

Posted: Fri Oct 11, 2013 2:38 pm
by sbaustin
nube wrote:I've just got here with my little Family for work and I just don't get it. I was sold the job with lots of positives but I can't see it now I'm here. Please fill me in on what I'm missing so I don't pack up and go home. I don't mean to be negative I just feel like I must be missing something?


Can you let us know all of the positives they mentioned to you?

Re: Learning to love lima

Posted: Fri Oct 11, 2013 3:41 pm
by nube
How do we go about joining a club like that? I have no idea. I thought you had to be invited?

I was told that our quality of life would be so much better. We would find a maid and good childcare easily neither of which is proving at all easy. It was a great life for kids here. The school would be fantastic. Everything would be so much cheaper but better. .. but I'm just not finding any of this to be the case?

Re: Learning to love lima

Posted: Fri Oct 11, 2013 3:44 pm
by chi chi
mammamia wrote:
nube wrote:I've just got here with my little Family for work and I just don't get it. I was sold the job with lots of positives but I can't see it now I'm here. Please fill me in on what I'm missing so I don't pack up and go home. I don't mean to be negative I just feel like I must be missing something?

Lima is a tough city to live in. When I first came to Peru I lived there for some time and, thank God, I had a chance to move to a provincial city, otherwise, I would have left Peru forever.

My advice is if you can't take it leave the city now or it will only get worse. You have to be born there to feel OK in Lima, at least, I feel that way and I can compare Lima with other capital cities because for the last 15 years I have lived in many places on every continent.


I travelled all around the world. Mostly because of my job as a flight attendant. Lima is the ugliest city I visited till now.
What you are missing is simple. You need to call STARPERU or TACA and book a flight to Tarapoto. (or better known as ''The city of the palmtrees''.)
Tarapoto is the safest and cleanest city in Peru.

You'll be amazed. It's paradise on earth up here.

https://www.google.com.pe/search?q=tara ... 1#imgdii=_

Re: Learning to love lima

Posted: Fri Oct 11, 2013 9:41 pm
by SilverbackPeru
nube wrote:How do we go about joining a club like that? I have no idea. I thought you had to be invited?

I was told that our quality of life would be so much better. We would find a maid and good childcare easily neither of which is proving at all easy. It was a great life for kids here. The school would be fantastic. Everything would be so much cheaper but better. .. but I'm just not finding any of this to be the case?


I was told the same things as you nube on how life would be cheaper and better by the wife about Peru. To this day it still remains the best joke i've ever heard! The only thing cheap about living in Lima is Rice! Other than that expect to pay European and North American prices for everything else. When ever i'm in a shop looking for stuff I always end up laughing to myself at how Peruvians just get totally and utterly ripped off for almost everything.

The good points are Peruvians are extremely nice friendly people, the nice little back streets you find in Miraflores with small restaurants and cafes, the weather despite being grey in winter never gets cold and if you get out into the suburbs the parks are really nice altho the trip into work can be hard work! San Isidro is great as well, the walk along the coast line cliffs is good too. Peru really has some great history and culture as well as natural beauty.

Bad points?.......don't expect to have too much spare cash kicking about, i think the myth of Peru being cheap was laid to rest 3 or 4 years ago. The 95% carbohydrate diet isn't great either!

Re: Learning to love lima

Posted: Sat Oct 12, 2013 7:45 am
by MarcoPE
SilverbackPeru wrote:The only thing cheap about living in Lima is Rice! Other than that expect to pay European and North American prices for everything else. When ever i'm in a shop looking for stuff I always end up laughing to myself at how Peruvians just get totally and utterly ripped off for almost everything.


Very true, and it seems - at least in my experience - most of the crap bought here is just that ... crap. I have never in my whole life had more stuff (appliances, stereos, computers, etc) in need of repair so often since living here, and these are even the alleged "quality name brands".

Re: Learning to love lima

Posted: Sat Oct 12, 2013 9:19 am
by Alpineprince
MarcoPE wrote:
SilverbackPeru wrote:The only thing cheap about living in Lima is Rice! Other than that expect to pay European and North American prices for everything else. When ever i'm in a shop looking for stuff I always end up laughing to myself at how Peruvians just get totally and utterly ripped off for almost everything.


Very true, and it seems - at least in my experience - most of the crap bought here is just that ... crap. I have never in my whole life had more stuff (appliances, stereos, computers, etc) in need of repair so often since living here, and these are even the alleged "quality name brands".

The salt air is brutal on electronics.

Re: Learning to love lima

Posted: Sat Oct 12, 2013 9:59 am
by chi chi
SilverbackPeru wrote:i think the myth of Peru being cheap was laid to rest 3 or 4 years ago.


Not only the prices are gone up in the last few years but the EURO and the Dollar rates are gone down and that affects many expats like myself that receive an income from abroad.

Re: Learning to love lima

Posted: Sat Oct 12, 2013 11:32 am
by Sergio Bernales
nube wrote:I've just got here with my little Family for work and I just don't get it. I was sold the job with lots of positives but I can't see it now I'm here. Please fill me in on what I'm missing so I don't pack up and go home. I don't mean to be negative I just feel like I must be missing something?


Mm, if you come to Lima with high expectations, you're almost definitely going to be disappointed. I came with low expectations and was pleasantly surprised. I had been in Quito for six months, which was a nice place to visit, but a horrible place to live, so being able to visit decent supermarkets and nice restaurants again was a real plus.

Parts of Lima are undoubtedly very ugly. The noisy traffic, bad driving, and lack of double glazing are my biggest criticisms, along with constantly ringing car alarms, all-night parties and barking dogs. Yet if you're in the right state of mind, find an apartment you're happy in and want to make the best of it, Lima can be very pleasant. I love strolling down the malecon on a sunny morning, going to the cinema is good value. There are some great cheap places to go for lunch, or for something more special, lots of really nice restaurants to eat out in the evening. In the summer, driving down to Santa Maria and spending the day at a very clean beach is nice. Wandering around el centro on a Sunday when it's quiet is also something I like.

I agree with everyone else that it's a myth that Peru is cheap, or at least for most things, and if you add in the appreciation of the sol against the dollar, the pound and the euro, there are few bargains to be had. Unless you're coming from a high-cost city, like London or New York, housing is not cheap. It was good value five or six years ago, but prices have almost tripled since then. Supermarkets are very expensive, clothing not particularly cheap and electronic goods are slightly more expensive and there's definitely less choice. Taxis and bus fares are still cheap, haircuts, too, or in fact most things that involve labour. So if you want a woman to clean your house, or a nanny to look after your children and you've got a good income, then you'll find those things cheap. But yes, as you've pointed out, recently it's got harder finding good nannies. I think because the economy has been growing, more people are taking other jobs. The best nannies will usually be found through word of mouth, especially from Peruvian friends.

By the way, what part of Lima are you living in and then people might be able to give you good recommendations for social activities and good places to take your kids? As the traffic can be a real pain, there's no point us recommending activities that means you've got a two-hour drive.

CrazytacoPeru's point about Ceineguilla is a good, as you can escape the winter grey and enjoy sunshine. I've been to some pleasant restaurants there with my girlfriends family, like Mesa de Piedra where there's a pool and areas for the kids to play while you sit back and enjoy a coffee or a drink, or something to eat.

Re: Learning to love lima

Posted: Sun Oct 13, 2013 12:06 pm
by BellbottomBlues
That kind of economy is not sustainable. In most countries I'm aware of - the cost of housing is linked to the local job market and wages....it doesn't seem to make sense that the cost of labor (even unskilled labor) would still remain cheap - unless, the housing market is driven by speculation and shady banking practices. Red flag!


BBB

Re: Learning to love lima

Posted: Sun Oct 13, 2013 7:16 pm
by nube
Thanks for all your thoughts and ideas.
We are in Monterrico and after a pretty good weekend I'm feeling a bit more positive but I'm still left wondering if I've missed something.
We went to the pentágono and Parque Kennedy with the kids. Strange to be entertainiy then whilst surrounded by traffic!
Will definitely take the advice to head out of town when we can. Had anyone got anywhere they would recommend to stay in chosika or anywhere else not to far away? Also when summer his whee are the best places to go to the beach without going too far?
Let's see if I can learn to love this town?

Re: Learning to love lima

Posted: Sun Oct 13, 2013 7:17 pm
by nube
Thanks for all your thoughts and ideas.
We are in Monterrico and after a pretty good weekend I'm feeling a bit more positive but I'm still left wondering if I've missed something.
We went to the pentágono and Parque Kennedy with the kids. Strange to be entertainiy then whilst surrounded by traffic!
Will definitely take the advice to head out of town when we can. Had anyone got anywhere they would recommend to stay in chosika or anywhere else not to far away? Also when summer his whee are the best places to go to the beach without going too far?
Let's see if I can learn to love this town?

Re: Learning to love lima

Posted: Mon Oct 14, 2013 10:10 am
by argidd
BellbottomBlues wrote:That kind of economy is not sustainable. In most countries I'm aware of - the cost of housing is linked to the local job market and wages....it doesn't seem to make sense that the cost of labor (even unskilled labor) would still remain cheap - unless, the housing market is driven by speculation and shady banking practices. Red flag!


BBB



BBB, Lima/Peruvian society is very complex. You have to understand that nannies don't live in Miraflores or San Isidro were rent can be $800 - $1500 for a nice apartment (nothing too fancy). Lima is a city of contrasts.... and while there is a stronger economy, there are many places where people live in invasions, or numerous families in one place. Didn't want to go off topic, but it is important to clarify...

Re: Learning to love lima

Posted: Mon Oct 14, 2013 7:41 pm
by Hitoruna
How about eating a little more rice? :mrgreen:


(runs away before getting hit by tomatoes, potatoes, empty cans...)

Re: Learning to love lima

Posted: Mon Oct 14, 2013 8:11 pm
by chi chi
argidd wrote:
BellbottomBlues wrote:That kind of economy is not sustainable. In most countries I'm aware of - the cost of housing is linked to the local job market and wages....it doesn't seem to make sense that the cost of labor (even unskilled labor) would still remain cheap - unless, the housing market is driven by speculation and shady banking practices. Red flag!


BBB



BBB, Lima/Peruvian society is very complex. You have to understand that nannies don't live in Miraflores or San Isidro were rent can be $800 - $1500 for a nice apartment (nothing too fancy). Lima is a city of contrasts.... and while there is a stronger economy, there are many places where people live in invasions, or numerous families in one place. Didn't want to go off topic, but it is important to clarify...


Indeed. The waitress that served your $100 five course dinner at that award winning restaurant in Miraflores, probably lives in a makeshift home without electricity or running water in a shantytown on the outskirts of Lima.

Re: Learning to love lima

Posted: Mon Oct 14, 2013 9:29 pm
by rgbjr
Hi
If you live in Montorrico try going to Agraria LA Molina it is a school in LA Molina that teachers about farming. They have a place for children to play and a restaurant that cooks and serves the food they grow at the schools including the meat, that is from the animals that they raise at the school. You will enjoy the day. You take Ave Javier Prado I will start at the University of Lima head toward Ave LA Molina make a right turn and go past Bimbos and the ovalo you will come to a Y in the road take the left side and go about one half mile more and the first entrance to the school is on the right go inside and on the right side you will a place that sells flowers and the restaurant. Or you can google Agraria La Molina.
Good Luck
I have lived in LA Molina now for 5 years and have no desire to go back to New York.
Bobby :D

Re: Learning to love lima

Posted: Mon Oct 14, 2013 9:57 pm
by BellbottomBlues
In this large, U.S. city, the maids are nearly all women and nearly all Latinas. They drive older Japanese vehicles and usually live with their extended families in the outer suburbs where rents and home prices are cheaper.

Nevertheless, they typically earn more than $30USD cash per hour which is far greater than the typical mimimum wage restaurant worker and they enjoy the independence and autonomy of working for themselves.

For unskilled labor, this is expensive....and so usually only affordable for the high income households....the same ones who earn incomes that drive the housing prices.

Perhaps these are two totally different situations..but it would seem that there has to be a ripple effect in Peru - where even the poorest neighborhoods have also experienced housing price increases?

BBB

Re: Learning to love lima

Posted: Tue Oct 15, 2013 12:15 am
by crazytacoperu.com
SilverbackPeru wrote:
nube wrote:How do we go about joining a club like that? I have no idea. I thought you had to be invited?

I was told that our quality of life would be so much better. We would find a maid and good childcare easily neither of which is proving at all easy. It was a great life for kids here. The school would be fantastic. Everything would be so much cheaper but better. .. but I'm just not finding any of this to be the case?


I was told the same things as you nube on how life would be cheaper and better by the wife about Peru. To this day it still remains the best joke i've ever heard! The only thing cheap about living in Lima is Rice! Other than that expect to pay European and North American prices for everything else. When ever i'm in a shop looking for stuff I always end up laughing to myself at how Peruvians just get totally and utterly ripped off for almost everything.

The good points are Peruvians are extremely nice friendly people, the nice little back streets you find in Miraflores with small restaurants and cafes, the weather despite being grey in winter never gets cold and if you get out into the suburbs the parks are really nice altho the trip into work can be hard work! San Isidro is great as well, the walk along the coast line cliffs is good too. Peru really has some great history and culture as well as natural beauty.

Bad points?.......don't expect to have too much spare cash kicking about, i think the myth of Peru being cheap was laid to rest 3 or 4 years ago. The 95% carbohydrate diet isn't great either!


I would disagree on the food aspect if you buy at the market. At least for me, Onions, Avocados, Papaya , Tomato, are all MUCH more expensive in the USA. Ground Beef is 12 soles a kilo = $1.80 lb. You can cook some great homemade marina sauce with ground beef for about 18 soles and feed 4. I do that once a week. Lettuce and Cucumbers are cheap, and I know where to buy a liter of olive oil for 20 soles.
Parties are cheap except for beer. Reasonable good whiskey and Pisco for 15 to 20 soles a bottle in the market, and Casillero del Diablo Cabernet for 20 soles - can't beat that (Metro sells it for 30 or more).

If you cook your own food, you can avoid the carbs and have MUCH healthier meals at a much more affordable price that the USA or Europe (so my European friends tell me).

I paid the telephone installer 200 soles to give me free cable, its been good for 3 years. Can't get that in the USA. (My gf says I should have paid only 50 soles, I think she was right but they can tell I am foreigner when I open my mouth to speak any Spanish).

Re: Learning to love lima

Posted: Tue Oct 15, 2013 2:14 pm
by tupacperu
nube wrote:Thanks for your response. It's made me feel a bit better already. Will definitely try oit some of your suggestions.
Argid my children are very young which I think is a big part of the problem. I feel as though they are so constrained here with little opportunity for them to run free while we all relax. I'm finding it quite isolated myself as going out is such hard work ...even trying to push a buggy along the street is a challenge


I had young kids in Lima. Most people live a closed existence, if you are not a part of a family, forget it. Most practically lived closed up in our homes. We would have to take the kids to activities on the weekend. To compound this LIma is a foggy chilly place, kind of depressing. Summers are really nice to get out. This is why we chose to buy in the north. If you are single and have no children, it can be a fun place.

Re: Learning to love lima

Posted: Tue Oct 15, 2013 7:47 pm
by SilverbackPeru
crazytacoperu.com wrote:
SilverbackPeru wrote:
nube wrote:How do we go about joining a club like that? I have no idea. I thought you had to be invited?

I was told that our quality of life would be so much better. We would find a maid and good childcare easily neither of which is proving at all easy. It was a great life for kids here. The school would be fantastic. Everything would be so much cheaper but better. .. but I'm just not finding any of this to be the case?


I was told the same things as you nube on how life would be cheaper and better by the wife about Peru. To this day it still remains the best joke i've ever heard! The only thing cheap about living in Lima is Rice! Other than that expect to pay European and North American prices for everything else. When ever i'm in a shop looking for stuff I always end up laughing to myself at how Peruvians just get totally and utterly ripped off for almost everything.

The good points are Peruvians are extremely nice friendly people, the nice little back streets you find in Miraflores with small restaurants and cafes, the weather despite being grey in winter never gets cold and if you get out into the suburbs the parks are really nice altho the trip into work can be hard work! San Isidro is great as well, the walk along the coast line cliffs is good too. Peru really has some great history and culture as well as natural beauty.

Bad points?.......don't expect to have too much spare cash kicking about, i think the myth of Peru being cheap was laid to rest 3 or 4 years ago. The 95% carbohydrate diet isn't great either!


I would disagree on the food aspect if you buy at the market. At least for me, Onions, Avocados, Papaya , Tomato, are all MUCH more expensive in the USA. Ground Beef is 12 soles a kilo = $1.80 lb. You can cook some great homemade marina sauce with ground beef for about 18 soles and feed 4. I do that once a week. Lettuce and Cucumbers are cheap, and I know where to buy a liter of olive oil for 20 soles.
Parties are cheap except for beer. Reasonable good whiskey and Pisco for 15 to 20 soles a bottle in the market, and Casillero del Diablo Cabernet for 20 soles - can't beat that (Metro sells it for 30 or more).

If you cook your own food, you can avoid the carbs and have MUCH healthier meals at a much more affordable price that the USA or Europe (so my European friends tell me).

I paid the telephone installer 200 soles to give me free cable, its been good for 3 years. Can't get that in the USA. (My gf says I should have paid only 50 soles, I think she was right but they can tell I am foreigner when I open my mouth to speak any Spanish).


Food is slighty cheaper here but it's when you compare it to the average Peruvians income that you realise how expensive it is here, and i still think most food in the UK compared to a persons income in the UK is better value. Just a few examples of how cheap it would be to eat back home.....
I could easily buy a foot long french baquette filled with chicken or seafood for 2quid, which works out at $3 or if i went to somewhere cheap like a chain like baquette express it would cost 1 pound or $1.50. Tescos 3 prawn sandwich set would be 1.19 ($1.80) blt would be maybe 2 quid. Mircowave ready meals cost maybe average 3 to 4 pound depending how fancy you want it to be but you can easily get cheap microwave meals for less than $3. Chicken fillets use to be extremely cheap as well.

I would say if you can find a sandwich for around 8 or 9 soles in miraflores then you've done well but even then it's only a small sandwich that's the size of your palm. Then there's the 10 soles menu spots which works out pretty decent but lets face it most of the dish you order is just going to be rice or potato in the end. Things like all meats, chocolate, cheese, most snacks or crisps, certain vegetables, alcohol and biscuits work out not that cheap.

Things you can get really cheap here is rice, potatos, most vegetables and fruit natural to Peru and i think fish and seafood work out ok. You can find cheap rum for 22 soles a bottle that's pretty good.

Re: Learning to love lima

Posted: Tue Oct 15, 2013 7:55 pm
by SilverbackPeru
There's also places like aldi and lidl back home that does bottles of alcohol like whiskey and rum for a fiver, i always use to buy bottles of Declans mock Baileys irish cream for as little as $4.50.

Re: Learning to love lima

Posted: Wed Oct 16, 2013 8:56 am
by chi chi
crazytacoperu.com wrote:If you cook your own food, you can avoid the carbs and have MUCH healthier meals at a much more affordable price that the USA or Europe (so my European friends tell me).


Logically, restaurants owners want to make a profit. They aren't charities.

Would you eat in a restaurant on a daily basis in your homecountry? No, so why would some people think it will work out cheaper to eat in a menu place on a daily basis?

Re: Learning to love lima

Posted: Wed Oct 16, 2013 10:59 pm
by SilverbackPeru
Well people go out during dinner time at work when back in the UK to buy a cheap sandwich, cheap cafe meal or something like a microwave meal from a supermarket. I could get a ready meal for 1.99 like a lasagna or a kebab but there's isn't anything that works out like that in Miraflores.

Sure there's the 2 soles midget empanadas you can buy from most tiendas but you need to buy about 3 of those to make one normal sized pie which i use to be able to buy for as little as 1.50 pound back home and which would be packed full of steak meat!

ChiChi you are right as well about them having to make a profit, lets face it when you know the price of renting property in miraflores then you know why food and other items cost so much, it's basically to cover the sky high rental price.

Re: Learning to love lima

Posted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 9:09 pm
by furryburrito
Why has no one mentioned the bidet? Are you an expat living in an older home? Let's talk bidets. Why there isn't a dedicated thread for this subject is perplexing to me. Perhaps it's the single-most coveted plumbing fixture that should be a staple of every American home but isn't. Maybe Peruvians just smell better. Can you say hygiene?

Re: Learning to love lima

Posted: Wed Oct 23, 2013 10:31 am
by KenBE
chi chi wrote:
crazytacoperu.com wrote:If you cook your own food, you can avoid the carbs and have MUCH healthier meals at a much more affordable price that the USA or Europe (so my European friends tell me).


Logically, restaurants owners want to make a profit. They aren't charities.

Would you eat in a restaurant on a daily basis in your homecountry? No, so why would some people think it will work out cheaper to eat in a menu place on a daily basis?


Well, I don't know, there are some very cheap restaurants in Peru. In Trujillo you can get a menu (full meal + drink) for just 5 soles (about $1.80). Of course you won't find these in Miraflores...

A lot of poor Peruvians eat at these places every day.

Re: Learning to love lima

Posted: Wed Oct 23, 2013 4:32 pm
by TShadow
Why has no one mentioned the bidet?


Ha, that's correct. I couldn't live without a bidet anymore. Every bath in Italy has a bidet. Fortunately I have a bidet at home.

Talking about food we already had many of this type of discussions here. When I compare the value I get here to my previous home, it's not favorable for Lima.

The title is about learning to love Lima, the more I stay the less I love it. My girl friend comes home every night badly stressed because she had to drive at least 90 minutes. Yesterday I nearly was ready to kill some idiots driving from La Molina to Miraflores. That most be mostly because I lived in a city 1% the size of Lima.

Mentally I'm ready to return to Italy.

Re: Learning to love lima

Posted: Thu Oct 24, 2013 9:24 am
by crazytacoperu.com
KenBE wrote:
chi chi wrote:
crazytacoperu.com wrote:If you cook your own food, you can avoid the carbs and have MUCH healthier meals at a much more affordable price that the USA or Europe (so my European friends tell me).


Logically, restaurants owners want to make a profit. They aren't charities.

Would you eat in a restaurant on a daily basis in your homecountry? No, so why would some people think it will work out cheaper to eat in a menu place on a daily basis?


Well, I don't know, there are some very cheap restaurants in Peru. In Trujillo you can get a menu (full meal + drink) for just 5 soles (about $1.80). Of course you won't find these in Miraflores...

A lot of poor Peruvians eat at these places every day.

You can find 5 soles menu VERY close to Miraflores in the Mercado #1 of Surquillo, which is across the Via Expresa on Ricardo Palma. Some very affordable breakfast sandwiches there as well. It is safe all day till about 8pm. They also sell DVD's and will test them for you. I shop there everyday for fresh veggies and meat.

Re: Learning to love lima

Posted: Thu Oct 24, 2013 11:50 am
by chi chi
KenBE wrote:Well, I don't know, there are some very cheap restaurants in Peru. In Trujillo you can get a menu (full meal + drink) for just 5 soles (about $1.80). Of course you won't find these in Miraflores...

A lot of poor Peruvians eat at these places every day.


I don't think that poor Peruvians will eat a 5 soles menu daily. The eat at home or at the stalls on the street.

Re: Learning to love lima

Posted: Thu Oct 24, 2013 2:51 pm
by KenBE
chi chi wrote:
KenBE wrote:Well, I don't know, there are some very cheap restaurants in Peru. In Trujillo you can get a menu (full meal + drink) for just 5 soles (about $1.80). Of course you won't find these in Miraflores...

A lot of poor Peruvians eat at these places every day.


I don't think that poor Peruvians will eat a 5 soles menu daily. The eat at home or at the stalls on the street.


Yes they do. My ex's mother used to have her own menu restaurant in a very poor area of Chimbote and she had lots of customers who came back every day. Or course it depends on what you mean by "poor".