Panhandlers

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chi chi
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Panhandlers

Postby chi chi » Sun Nov 23, 2014 4:23 pm

Do you give money to panhandlers?

There are loads of them in Lima. They try to sell caramelos on the Street.

On the bus, the show some medical prescriptions and claim not to have money to buy medication. Some show a letter that says that they are released from jail and need money for food and accomodation.

How much do you give and why or why don't you give them money?


NickCasper
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Re: Panhandlers

Postby NickCasper » Tue Nov 25, 2014 10:13 pm

I don't give anything anymore. Money problems and lack of any job are my reason.
ironchefchris
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Re: Panhandlers

Postby ironchefchris » Tue Nov 25, 2014 11:28 pm

Someone fairly recently criticized me for throwing a coin or two in the hat of certain panhandlers, believing they were working illegally and that I was contributing to their unlawful activities. "You may find artists and craftspeople, bohemians, circus performers appealing, cute and quaint or whatever but Peru does not, as it does not allow for such visas. They lied to get into Peru and have no intentions of following the laws of Peru. Spitting on Peru, its people and laws."

Last I checked, there is nothing illegal about panhandling. How is it different if someone sticks their hand out and asks for money offering nothing in return vs. someone selling caramelos vs. someone strumming a guitar with a cup at their feet? Not a one of them is technically working. They have no boss. They didn't fill out a job application. They have no job. Without a job, they are no more illegal than the person sticking their hand out offering nothing in return. If these people are a problem for entering Peru to strum a guitar hoping for some coin, should we all check for their legal status? Should I ask the woman selling caramelos if she is Peruvian and can produce a DNI or if she is from Bolivia and thus panhandling illegally, or taking "work" away from Peruvian panhandlers, or those foreigners who entered Peru legally with working papers and have the legal right to panhandle? How 'bout those street musicians? Do we need to confirm their legal ability to strum a guitar or blow a flute on the street before tossing a coin their way? What if they are Chilean?

Me, I give money to people panhandling on the street based on how I feel in the moment. Some people you know really need it, and some don't. There's this local kid around 14 or so who turns on and off the crocodile tears like a water faucet. I've never given him anything. There's another local who is physically deformed (lack of fingers on one of his hands). I used to give him some coin occasionally until one day a local pointed out to me that he actually is quite well off and to take a look at his clothes (which were rather nice). I usually help out the people who really look like they need it or the random person who's hustling a candy bar (though I usually don't take one). It's not too hard to discern from who's really hurting and who is being lazy sticking their hand out instead of working a box of candy bars or a bag of caramellos or some other item they can work.

When I lived in Venice Beach we had a 'street performer' named Bobby Brown who billed himself as the 'World's Greatest Wino.' He's schtick was that "I'm not lookin' for something to eat. I'm not lookin' for a cup of coffee. I lookin' to get drunk!" He'd tell jokes on the boardwalk hoping to score some booze money. "I'll kiss your mother-in-law for a dollar!" Every now and then we'd gift him a bottle of cheap, Trader Joe's wine, appreciating his honesty. He was a good old guy with some real interesting stories and agreed to sit for a portrait for my then g.f., a painter, as the three of us shared a bottle of wine. I encountered this guy once when getting out of my car to go into a coffee shop. He asked if I could spare some change for coffee but repeatedly turned down my offer to actually buy him a cup of coffee instead of giving him money. "No, can you spare any change for coffee," he kept saying, as if I didn't understand his request. Had he been honest and asked me for a little help so he could chase the morning alcoholic shakes I might have helped him out, but he got no coffee (which he didn't want) or change out of me. The best panhandlers I ever encountered were a very talented group of Chinese students going to the Berklee School of Music who performed as a string quartet in the main Boston T (subway/tube) station, entertaining the going home from work crowd. They cleaned up.
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adrian Thorne
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Re: Panhandlers

Postby adrian Thorne » Wed Nov 26, 2014 7:14 am

We have a regular habit of asking for a doggy bag after our meal at the restaurant. It usually comes in a nice polystyrene box and then my wife goes hunting for the children outside in the street. If we are part of a larger party we buy a simple extra meal and hand that out when we leave. The kids love it. I think the problem is there are a lot of people who don the clothes and do it as a part time job, inhibiting genuine people in need.
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Re: Panhandlers

Postby eggman » Wed Nov 26, 2014 7:56 am

They ask me (a gringo) but I never have any money.
My wife (a Peruaña) keeps the money when we are out and about and they never ask her.
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chi chi
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Re: Panhandlers

Postby chi chi » Sun Nov 30, 2014 7:00 am

ironchefchris wrote:I usually help out the people who really look like they need it or the random person who's hustling a candy bar (though I usually don't take one). It's not too hard to discern from who's really hurting and who is being lazy sticking their hand out instead of working a box of candy bars or a bag of caramellos or some other item they can work.


The people that sell caramelos or candy bars aren't panhandlers. They are salespeople.
They sell ítems to earn an income.

Same with the people that sell bottles of wáter at the traffic lights.
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Re: Panhandlers

Postby Slippery Jack » Sun Nov 30, 2014 8:30 am

chi chi wrote:
ironchefchris wrote:I usually help out the people who really look like they need it or the random person who's hustling a candy bar (though I usually don't take one). It's not too hard to discern from who's really hurting and who is being lazy sticking their hand out instead of working a box of candy bars or a bag of caramellos or some other item they can work.


The people that sell caramelos or candy bars aren't panhandlers. They are salespeople.
They sell ítems to earn an income.

Same with the people that sell bottles of wáter at the traffic lights.


So why did you call them panhandlers in your original post? I'm confused.
Those are my principles, and if you don't like them... well, I have others.
ironchefchris
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Re: Panhandlers

Postby ironchefchris » Sun Nov 30, 2014 11:46 am

chi chi wrote:Do you give money to panhandlers?

There are loads of them in Lima. They try to sell caramelos on the Street.

chi chi wrote:The people that sell caramelos or candy bars aren't panhandlers. They are salespeople.

Slippery Jack wrote:So why did you call them panhandlers in your original post? I'm confused.

Cult leaders are known for regularly making conflicting statements which cause cognitive dissonance amongst the followers, leading the now confused to have to turn to the leader to seek clarification, reenforcing the authority position of the leader. L Ron Hubbard, founder of the scam known as $cientology, was a master at this. :twisted:

Not trying to suggest chi chi is doing anything as malicious as running a cult (though the 'cult of chi chi' does have a ring to it :wink: ) but perhaps his conflicting information has his one known and confirmed follower in a state of confusion, blindly going along with whatever his leader/guru says no matter what he says. BTW, I'm not referring to to Slippery Jack as the confused follower. He's probably just as confused as the rest of us by the above conflicting statements.
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Re: Panhandlers

Postby RICHARDandNORA » Sun Nov 30, 2014 12:03 pm

It appears to me that there has been a gradual decrease in street beggars compared to my first entry into Lima 22 years ago. However, they do still exist. I will only donate if the individual appears to be unable to care for themself, such as a very old lady.......
Slippery Jack
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Re: Panhandlers

Postby Slippery Jack » Sun Nov 30, 2014 3:17 pm

ironchefchris wrote:
chi chi wrote:Do you give money to panhandlers?

There are loads of them in Lima. They try to sell caramelos on the Street.

chi chi wrote:The people that sell caramelos or candy bars aren't panhandlers. They are salespeople.

Slippery Jack wrote:So why did you call them panhandlers in your original post? I'm confused.

Cult leaders are known for regularly making conflicting statements which cause cognitive dissonance amongst the followers, leading the now confused to have to turn to the leader to seek clarification, reenforcing the authority position of the leader. L Ron Hubbard, founder of the scam known as $cientology, was a master at this. :twisted:

Not trying to suggest chi chi is doing anything as malicious as running a cult (though the 'cult of chi chi' does have a ring to it :wink: ) but perhaps his conflicting information has his one known and confirmed follower in a state of confusion, blindly going along with whatever his leader/guru says no matter what he says. BTW, I'm not referring to to Slippery Jack as the confused follower. He's probably just as confused as the rest of us by the above conflicting statements.


Chi Chi is my leader, Chi Chi is my leader. What shall I do now Master Chi Chi?

Yep, that's me.
Those are my principles, and if you don't like them... well, I have others.
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adrian Thorne
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Re: Panhandlers

Postby adrian Thorne » Sun Nov 30, 2014 4:00 pm

Leading a sheltered life in the country side of England, I was totally shocked to see pregnant girls, in the teens, with four or five children in tow. (I later heard they rented the children by the day). The child being dragged up the road by a man whom the child obviously had never met before that day and the elderly old dears cleaning overtaking mirrors. Being untrained I would gladly give two to five soles at the time to ease my conscience.
Well the years have trundled on and the police have clamped down on child exploitation. The old Dears are still around and I always give a few cents. The crowd of window washers seem to have gone, thank god, and the kids have now grown a little so Mother can sit on the central reservation coordinating her team.
The disabled man with no arms and smartly dressed is still there hoping for a little cash and the gentleman with public notoriety is still skipping down the road dreaming of the big order for two or three ropes.
Things are changing but it takes time and with no social support, as some advertised European countries, they need as much help as we can afford to give.
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Re: Panhandlers

Postby Lloyd007 » Sun Nov 30, 2014 8:14 pm

I often give a sol or two, but I am more than happy to do it when I see that the person asking is actually doing something proactive to earn it. Last week, two young lads - early twenties - got on the same bus as me and did a brilliant musical item of guitar/banjo and singing... I mean, they'd put in the effort to actually learn to do something, share their talent and EARN something from it from the people in the bus. I take my hat off to them. I can't be easy to do that and perform ona swaying bus without feeling shame. Uni students trying to pay their education instead of a sob story in a muffled tone which you just never know is true or totally made up.
There's also an old granny I often see around the market close to my home, no teeth, basic grubby clothing and a sweet voice of ''joven, me puedes ayudar por favor...'' Claro que si, I tell her and drop a few coins in to her tub. Bless her.

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