The Frozen Food Aisle

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The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby Dave » Tue Feb 10, 2015 7:02 pm

I used to love the convenience and high quality of many frozen foods in the US. Most supermarkets have dozens of freezers with a great variety of choices, many of which were organic and/or all-natural. They tasted great and were very fast and easy to prepare.

In Lima I have found the options extremely limited. I do think they have been growing in recent years but there still doesn't seem to be much variety. Part of it is probably a cultural idea that frozen foods are of poor quality (e.g. the 5cina ("sin cocina") brand), hence low demand, but if the quality were to come then the idea and demand should change.

Questions for you all:
1. Does anyone else have the same kind of longing for the convenience of good frozen foods?
2. Why do you think they haven't taken off here?
3. What frozen foods have you found here that you thought were pretty good?
(I'll start by saying I have found some decent seafood options including frozen snapper and imitation crab meat, some good frozen hamburger patties, and some halfway-decent frozen pizzas.)


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Re: Frozen Foods

Postby caliguy » Tue Feb 10, 2015 7:13 pm

Dave wrote:Questions for you all:
1. Does anyone else have the same kind of longing for the convenience of good frozen foods?
2. Why do you think they haven't taken off here?
3. What frozen foods have you found here that you thought were pretty good?
(I'll start by saying I have found some decent seafood options including frozen snapper and imitation crab meat, some good frozen hamburger patties, and some halfway-decent frozen pizzas.)


1. not really so much of a longing, as going out to restaurants is very reasonable.
2. eating at a menu is dirt cheap, and preparing home made food at home is common.
3. i bought some frozen chicken patties that weren't too bad. other than that, not much else.
i have made large batches of spaghetti at home, and portioned it out into tupperware and put in the freezer and it stays good for quite some time.
you have probably noticed too, that frozen food is more expensive here. and Peruvians can be quite frugal :D
every place has it's own spirit. you just need to tune into it.
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Re: Frozen Foods

Postby Dave » Tue Feb 10, 2015 8:08 pm

caliguy wrote:
Dave wrote:you have probably noticed too, that frozen food is more expensive here. and Peruvians can be quite frugal :D


Sure, but sometimes at least, time is money.

Do you remember the name brand of the chicken patties and where you bought them?
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby Dave » Tue Feb 10, 2015 8:14 pm

...and why for that matter are frozen foods so expensive? That's another question.

Ice cream is frozen, and it's everywhere here, and way cheaper than it is in the US. Why not other frozen foods?
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby chi chi » Tue Feb 10, 2015 8:51 pm

I am not a fan of frozen food either. (apart from icecream off course :D )

I prefer freshly made food. I think that once food is frozen and reheated, it loses it's taste, color and tastes watery.

I also prepare my own icecream and sorbets with chunks of fresh fruit in it. Much better than the factory made icecream full off colouring products and artificial taste chemicals. Icecream and sorbets are so easy to make and take little time. My gf never liked icecream till she tried my icecream and sorbets.


Probably Peruvians don't buy a lot of frozen food as the freezer compartment in their fridge is used to quickly cool down the ''chelas'' on sunday. :lol:
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby caliguy » Tue Feb 10, 2015 9:37 pm

chi chi wrote:I am not a fan of frozen food either. (apart from icecream off course :D )
I also prepare my own icecream and sorbets with chunks of fresh fruit in it. Much better than the factory made icecream full off colouring products and artificial taste chemicals. Icecream and sorbets are so easy to make and take little time. My gf never liked icecream till she tried my icecream and sorbets.


chi chi, have you ever tried "Huracan" by D'Onofrio, made with juice of the maracuya? they are irresistibly good.
Dave, the brand of the chicken patties were "San Fernando". bought at Metro.
frozen foods are a specialty item, and on top of that, they need to be kept in the store freezer, and that costs money. if you look at some of the food in the frozen section, some of it looks as though it¿s been there for ages. also, there is not much demand, except for maybe a handful of expats.
every place has it's own spirit. you just need to tune into it.
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby fanning » Tue Feb 10, 2015 9:55 pm

When we don't feel like to cook, we order delivery ( Papa Johns or Pardos Chicken ) or go out to eat in a restaurant ( Using our Cuenta Sueldo for 50% discount ).
I think many Peruvians who make around S/. 1000 will never buy frozen food as it is too expensive. They cook at home and take it in a tupper to work, or they eat in a menu type of place.
People with money generally have a maid who cooks, or they eat out. In the end we are in Peru, where time is NOT money ..
Relax !!
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby Dave » Tue Feb 10, 2015 9:55 pm

caliguy wrote:frozen foods are a specialty item, and on top of that, they need to be kept in the store freezer, and that costs money. if you look at some of the food in the frozen section, some of it looks as though it¿s been there for ages. also, there is not much demand, except for maybe a handful of expats.


Store freezers cost money, sure, but there are thousands of guys wheeling around modified bicycles selling ice cream, and the ice cream stays reasonably frozen within their little coolers. So no reason they can't also ride around selling frozen foods.

Maybe there is no demand because Peruvians think frozen food is bad here -- which is true -- but then it's kind of chicken and egg. I wouldn't buy much frozen food in the US if the supply was equal to what is available in Peru. If the supply were more varied and of higher quality here, there could very well be more demand. I know my Peruvian wife enjoyed many frozen options from the US when we were living there together.
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby Dave » Tue Feb 10, 2015 10:04 pm

fanning wrote:When we don't feel like to cook, we order delivery ( Papa Johns or Pardos Chicken ) or go out to eat in a restaurant ( Using our Cuenta Sueldo for 50% discount ).
I think many Peruvians who make around S/. 1000 will never buy frozen food as it is too expensive. They cook at home and take it in a tupper to work, or they eat in a menu type of place.
People with money generally have a maid who cooks, or they eat out. In the end we are in Peru, where time is NOT money ..
Relax !!


Cooking at home takes much more time than microwaving a large frozen meal. And of course time is money no matter where you're from. A working mother might refrain from staying an extra hour at work because she anticipates needing an hour at night to prepare a meal from scratch. She could work later if she knew she had a decent frozen meal waiting at home. Not every evening, but sometimes it can work out.

And while frozen food is expensive I still ate more cheaply cooking microwaved frozen dinners from the US compared to any kind of delivery meal I've gotten from Papa Johns or Pardos here in Lima. A Pardos meal delivered is at least 20 soles. I could have a nice frozen meal for $5. I suspect a domestic company producing frozen food with locally sourced ingredients could sell a meal even cheaper than that.

I believe you may be reflecting the opinion of the locals; I'm simply suggesting that this opinion is based more on the options that are available rather than an imagination of what could be available.
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby caliguy » Tue Feb 10, 2015 10:33 pm

Dave wrote:Store freezers cost money, sure, but there are thousands of guys wheeling around modified bicycles selling ice cream, and the ice cream stays reasonably frozen within their little coolers. So no reason they can't also ride around selling frozen foods.

lol, with a super long extention cord! i meant expensive as in electrical costs.
every place has it's own spirit. you just need to tune into it.
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby rgbjr » Wed Feb 11, 2015 8:32 am

Hello Fanning
What is ( Using our Cuenta Sueldo for 50% discount ). I am interested in investigating this for myself and my wife. Also who accepts it.

Thank you
Bobby :D


fanning wrote:When we don't feel like to cook, we order delivery ( Papa Johns or Pardos Chicken ) or go out to eat in a restaurant ( Using our Cuenta Sueldo for 50% discount ).
I think many Peruvians who make around S/. 1000 will never buy frozen food as it is too expensive. They cook at home and take it in a tupper to work, or they eat in a menu type of place.
People with money generally have a maid who cooks, or they eat out. In the end we are in Peru, where time is NOT money ..
Relax !!
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby fanning » Wed Feb 11, 2015 9:52 am

A Cuenta Sueldo is just a bank account in which your salary is deposited. Most banks give extras like discounts in restaurants. If you also have your CTS deposited in the same bank, they give more discounts. For example with BCP I get 50% discount in the following restaurants:
Olive, Hornero, Caplina, Hanzo, Bonbonniere, Bistecca, Jose Antonio, Pozito, Charlotte, Vinilo, 40% in Viejo Fundo, Fridays, Piccolina, News Cafe, Preferida, Matria, and many more with 35% or 30%.
All these discounts are up to S/. 100, but that usually works out if you eat with 4 people or less.

All you need to do is have your company deposit your salary in a salary account. Also you get better discounts if your salary is higher and you have Banco Exclusiva. The only drawback for me is tha BCP gives a low interest rate on my CTS, while others like Ripley or Cencosud give higher interest rates. But this is mostly compensated with the discounts. And these are discounts in your daily live, not some 'fictional' money you have in your CTS, as anyway I cannot withdraw that money as long as I have a stable job..
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby rgbjr » Wed Feb 11, 2015 4:09 pm

Thank you
For the answer

Bobby :D
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby chi chi » Wed Feb 11, 2015 5:04 pm

fanning wrote:Papa Johns


Their pizza base tastes like cardboard.
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby Guiri » Wed Feb 11, 2015 6:53 pm

fanning wrote:...as anyway I cannot withdraw that money as long as I have a stable job..
Of course you can :D for paying the debt on your apartment or renovation work....actually from last year it was a law planned to use a certain percentage for consumer goods, which is ridiculous in my book :roll:

back on topic:
I think that frozen meals will never take off in Peru ....fresh things are cheap and abundant. Only thing I am missing are frozen peas...the fresh ones you find here taste nothing. :D
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby ironchefchris » Wed Feb 11, 2015 8:19 pm

chi chi wrote:
fanning wrote:Papa Johns


Their pizza base tastes like cardboard.

Here's something we agree on 100% (though I'd still love a reference backing up your unsubstantiated opinion on ayahuasca - it's been a while when all it takes is a simple Google search - how 'bout it?). I've had conversations with other expat (pizza snobs) who absolutely refuse to get a pizza from Papa John's, Domino's, Pizza Hut, etc.. Surprisingly, we all have Peruvian friends who prefer these places to local places that make their pizza's in wood fired ovens. Perhaps because those gringo chains are foreign and exoctic? Life is too short to eat bad pizza.

Haven't had frozen food since I moved to Peru. Don't even walk past that section in the supermarket. I used to wonder when I lived in NY why anyone would buy a frozen pizza for about the same price they'd pay for an excellent NY pizza from an Italian pizza parlor.
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby Dave » Thu Feb 12, 2015 1:31 am

Not to get too off topic but I am somewhat surprised at the hate for the US pizza chains. Maybe I have just had bad experiences with local pizza (any suggestions welcome) but I much prefer the US brands to any local pizza I have had in Peru. At least a thin crust Pizza Hut is recognizable. All I've seen locally are concoctions of chewy cheese, canned sauce, soggy dough, and usually huge amounts of cheap ham scattered all over it. I just felt a 'funk' taste whenever I tried them. I would pay big money for an authentic NY slice here but have never seen anything close to it.

Someone, please, recommend a place that proves me wrong on my Peruvian pizza opinions? :)
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby caliguy » Thu Feb 12, 2015 7:44 am

Dave wrote:Not to get too off topic but I am somewhat surprised at the hate for the US pizza chains. Maybe I have just had bad experiences with local pizza (any suggestions welcome) but I much prefer the US brands to any local pizza I have had in Peru. At least a thin crust Pizza Hut is recognizable. All I've seen locally are concoctions of chewy cheese, canned sauce, soggy dough, and usually huge amounts of cheap ham scattered all over it. I just felt a 'funk' taste whenever I tried them. I would pay big money for an authentic NY slice here but have never seen anything close to it.

Someone, please, recommend a place that proves me wrong on my Peruvian pizza opinions? :)

out of the big 3 chains, i prefer Pizza Hut. it seems to taste better here than the U.S. have you tried pizza Raul?
every place has it's own spirit. you just need to tune into it.
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby rgbjr » Thu Feb 12, 2015 9:37 am

I agree with you thats why I make my own pizza from scratch including sauce and dough. The only thing I buy is the cheese and I buy that at an Italian store called Mr. raviolis in Monterrico. I bought a pizza stone and I enjoy making my own NY Pizza. You should try it. It is not that hard to do.
Bobby :D

Dave wrote:Not to get too off topic but I am somewhat surprised at the hate for the US pizza chains. Maybe I have just had bad experiences with local pizza (any suggestions welcome) but I much prefer the US brands to any local pizza I have had in Peru. At least a thin crust Pizza Hut is recognizable. All I've seen locally are concoctions of chewy cheese, canned sauce, soggy dough, and usually huge amounts of cheap ham scattered all over it. I just felt a 'funk' taste whenever I tried them. I would pay big money for an authentic NY slice here but have never seen anything close to it.

Someone, please, recommend a place that proves me wrong on my Peruvian pizza opinions? :)
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby ironchefchris » Thu Feb 12, 2015 11:10 am

Dave wrote:Not to get too off topic but I am somewhat surprised at the hate for the US pizza chains. Maybe I have just had bad experiences with local pizza (any suggestions welcome) but I much prefer the US brands to any local pizza I have had in Peru. At least a thin crust Pizza Hut is recognizable. All I've seen locally are concoctions of chewy cheese, canned sauce, soggy dough, and usually huge amounts of cheap ham scattered all over it. I just felt a 'funk' taste whenever I tried them. I would pay big money for an authentic NY slice here but have never seen anything close to it.

Someone, please, recommend a place that proves me wrong on my Peruvian pizza opinions? :)

The average pizza place with the chewy cheese, canned, soggy, ham, funk dough is pretty bad. I don't go to those places. But if you look around there's options. Where I live in Arequipa there's a handful of places with brick ovens that make a decent pie. The best is partially staffed with Italians.

I grew up in NY eating those authentic thin slices you referred to. I naively thought all pizza tasted like that until I started traveling around a bit. I don't know if it's because NY does in fact have the best pizza (in the US) or because that's what my taste buds grew accustomed to. I've read it's the mineral content in the water that makes the difference. There's even a pizza place in Beverly HIlls that claims to replicate the mineral content of NY tap water. Traveling abroad I realized that my beloved NY pizza was just one of many varieties of an Italian dish. Italians live all over the world. Some of the best pizza I've had was in Italian restaurants in countries with climates similar to Italy.

Wish I could help you with a recommendation for a place where you can find your NY style, thin slice that you can fold over. I'd pay the big bucks too. I once brought three NY pizzas as my carry-on (in ziploc bags) along with some bagels on a domestic flight so I could share with my West coast friends who never have been to NY. I'm not overly familiar with Lima, but there's a place on Angamos Oeste, near Huaca Pucllan, called GianFranco's that serves a decent pizza. It's not NY style, but there's people speaking Italian, sipping espresso at the tables. The best pizza and Italian food I've had in Peru was at a place in Máncora; Antica Pizzeria. Thin slices. Maybe the nice atmosphere and being at the beach had something to do with it. I believe they also have a place in Barranco, but I haven't been.

There's an idea for frozen food. If you can produce and package something close to a NY pizza I would start going to the frozen food section of the supermarket. Frequently.
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby Sergio Bernales » Thu Feb 12, 2015 12:49 pm

On the subject of pizzas...

http://www.eldiariony.com/cucarachas-ci ... pizza-peru

Now if it were Mexico, they could have argued that it was a new topping.

Back to the original question, of why frozen food isn't common here - there is no one specific reason, but rather lots of little ones. Mainly, there isn't a culture of buying frozen food here. Most people don't see the point of it. And they are more likely to shop on a day to day basis and buy fresh produce rather than drive to a big supermarket and fill the car up with packaged and frozen food to last the week. And as you pointed out it's expensive, so why buy frozen food when fresh food is cheaper. Also, in the past, there were regular electricity cuts, so there was no guarantee your food would stay frozen.
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby chi chi » Thu Feb 12, 2015 8:26 pm

rgbjr wrote:I agree with you thats why I make my own pizza from scratch including sauce and dough. The only thing I buy is the cheese and I buy that at an Italian store called Mr. raviolis in Monterrico. I bought a pizza stone and I enjoy making my own NY Pizza. You should try it. It is not that hard to do.
Bobby :D


I make my own pizzas as well. Pizza is one of the easiest things to make.

In Peru, I buy the cheese in Makro. They sell big bags of grated Gruyere cheese.

(I only put cheese on half the pizza. On the other half, I can't put cheese.)
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby ironchefchris » Thu Feb 12, 2015 10:30 pm

I walked by the frozen food section of the medium sized Tottus near me earlier. There were some chicken patties, frozen shrimp, and frozen fish filets. That's it. There was about five times as much space for ice cream.
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby Sergio Bernales » Thu Feb 12, 2015 10:49 pm

It's almost impossible to make a truly great pizza in a normal domestic oven. It's the heat that's the thing... and quality of ingredients. But there are things like steel plates and pizza stones to help if you want to get the quality of your pizza up a notch...

http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/04/esse ... -home.html
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby Dave » Fri Feb 13, 2015 1:49 am

ironchefchris wrote:There was about five times as much space for ice cream.

Yeah, the tremendous popularity of ice cream here confuses me even more as to why all other frozen foods are unpopular.

Concerns about electricity going out at home, cultural preference for "fresh" things, store owners cost to run the freezers...all are arguments that should work against ice cream too. If ice cream easily surmounts those potential obstacles, why not other frozen foods?
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby chi chi » Fri Feb 13, 2015 5:04 am

Sergio Bernales wrote:It's almost impossible to make a truly great pizza in a normal domestic oven. It's the heat that's the thing... and quality of ingredients. But there are things like steel plates and pizza stones to help if you want to get the quality of your pizza up a notch...

http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/04/esse ... -home.html


Good article-

I bake my pizzas in a normal domestic gas oven and my pizzas are at least 100 times better than those from those chain pizza joints. And quality products that you need to prepare a pizza can be found easily.
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby ironchefchris » Fri Feb 13, 2015 8:53 am

Dave wrote:
ironchefchris wrote:There was about five times as much space for ice cream.

Yeah, the tremendous popularity of ice cream here confuses me even more as to why all other frozen foods are unpopular.

Concerns about electricity going out at home, cultural preference for "fresh" things, store owners cost to run the freezers...all are arguments that should work against ice cream too. If ice cream easily surmounts those potential obstacles, why not other frozen foods?

The power going out is a perfect excuse to eat any and all ice cream in the freezer.
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby Sergio Bernales » Fri Feb 13, 2015 10:37 am

Dave wrote:
ironchefchris wrote:There was about five times as much space for ice cream.

Yeah, the tremendous popularity of ice cream here confuses me even more as to why all other frozen foods are unpopular.

Concerns about electricity going out at home, cultural preference for "fresh" things, store owners cost to run the freezers...all are arguments that should work against ice cream too. If ice cream easily surmounts those potential obstacles, why not other frozen foods?


Now, maybe it is chicken and egg, until the quality improves and the prices drop, people won't buy, but this isn't going to happen until you have economies of scale, more sales, better quality, so frozen food is going to remain a niche product for the time being. But I've also noticed this in Italy, Portugal and Spain as well - there is just less demand for frozen foods. You go into a supermarket there and there are hardly any aisles with frozen food. However, this is changing as companies challenge local perceptions. Perhaps this article might explain the cultural perception and how companies are trying to get round the negative perceptions. I think it's roughly where you're coming from.

http://www.euromonitor.com/frozen-proce ... aly/report

http://www.frozenfoodeurope.com/article ... ue-tighten

Now, one strange thing about negative perceptions of frozen food is I've read that vegetables and fruit that is immediately frozen after being picked retains many more nutrients and flavour. Corn on the cob (yellow sweetcorn, not maiz) is a good example.

One difference between ice cream and other frozen foods is you eat ice cream frozen. So it doesn't suffer from the negative perceptions that most frozen food does here. And most Peruvians I know have a sweet tooth. I also read in that article that Italy is Europe's biggest market for ice cream, but it is the least developed for frozen food. Perhaps there's an Italian influence here in Peru.

And if you've got a week's worth of grocery's in the freezer of your fridge and there's a power cut, it could be a disaster for many families. However, if you've got a few tubs of ice cream, not such a big deal. As Chris says, it's a good excuse for an ice cream binge.
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby teamoperu » Sun Feb 15, 2015 11:09 am

“I also prepare my own icecream and sorbets with chunks of fresh fruit in it. Much better than the factory made icecream full off colouring products and artificial taste chemicals. Icecream and sorbets are so easy to make and take little time. My gf never liked icecream till she tried my icecream and sorbets.”

You're the man, but...

“But bear in mind that homemade ice cream will never be as smooth as store bought, simply because you don't have a commercial power churning device. Soluble fiber gums like xanthan and guar (available in health food stores) promote smaller ice crystal formation. Invert sugar provides superior freezing point depression (with a lower freezing point you have less ice to make crystals). Lastly, lecithin is available to the home cook. Lecithin helps create a better emulsion, breaking down the water and fat into smaller units. With smaller units of water, you end up with smaller particles of ice.”


“I make my own pizzas as well. Pizza is one of the easiest things to make.
In Peru, I buy the cheese in Makro. They sell big bags of grated Gruyere cheese.”

“I bake my pizzas in a normal domestic gas oven and my pizzas are at least 100 times better than those from those chain pizza joints. And quality products that you need to prepare a pizza can be found easily.”

You're the man, but...

“Why does the local pizzeria's pizza taste better than the stuff you make at home? It's likely because their oven is hotter than yours. A hotter oven leads to superior oven-spring—the early phase of baking during which air and vapor bubbles inside dough rapidly expand, causing the dough to become airy and full of holes. A hot oven also creates a better contrast between crisp, lightly charred exterior, and soft, cloud-like interior.”
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby cmcarriemarie » Sun Feb 15, 2015 10:19 pm

Dave - my uncle was telling me about a place in San Isidro on Av Arequipa that sells Italian frozen dinners. Not sure what the name is but he was planning to take me there this week. Should I keep you informed?
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby Dave » Mon Feb 16, 2015 12:20 am

cmcarriemarie wrote:Dave - my uncle was telling me about a place in San Isidro on Av Arequipa that sells Italian frozen dinners. Not sure what the name is but he was planning to take me there this week. Should I keep you informed?


Sure! If you find anything interesting post it here.
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby gringo from uk » Mon Feb 16, 2015 9:47 am

Hi.
About Your question
- Why do you think they haven't taken off here?

I believe the frozen food is not a part of the Peruvian kitchen culture. People love to cook and love to eat. If it comes to lunch or dinner, people like to take time to cook and eat together with the whole family. Although ,as You mentioned "time is money" ,in Peru there is always time for a good food to share with friends and family.
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chi chi
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby chi chi » Tue Feb 17, 2015 4:29 am

gringo from uk wrote:Hi.
About Your question
- Why do you think they haven't taken off here?

I believe the frozen food is not a part of the Peruvian kitchen culture. People love to cook and love to eat. If it comes to lunch or dinner, people like to take time to cook and eat together with the whole family. Although ,as You mentioned "time is money" ,in Peru there is always time for a good food to share with friends and family.


Fresh ingredients look better than a frozen block of food.
It's takes longer to defrost that block of frozen food than preparing something fresh.

Personally, I find that food that has been frozen loses it's taste.
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tupacperu
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby tupacperu » Tue Feb 17, 2015 7:50 pm

Have you checked the size of most refrigerators in Peru? lol..... from experience most Peruvian cook day to day, visiting the outdoor markets to get fresh produce and meat.... Frozen food and healthy? I would check the list of chemicals on the package. :)
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby Dave » Wed Feb 18, 2015 11:50 pm

tupacperu wrote:Frozen food and healthy? I would check the list of chemicals on the package. :)

Well as I alluded to in my original post, there are some frozen foods which have purely all natural ingredients and no preservatives. Certainly some frozen foods are chemical upon chemical of processed crap, but that's true of many non-frozen foods too. The state of something being frozen doesn't automatically mean it must have been produced in an industrial chemical lab. But that sort of misconception is perhaps why it isn't more popular here.

My wife was astonished that I put a fresh loaf of fresh bread into the freezer, and couldn't believe that it came out fresh a month later. It's something I have done my whole life. There really does seem to be a phobia for anything frozen here, save ice cream.

And for those interested, a cool article from the BBC today:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/resources/idt-02b44e78-2da1-4a27-bcc5-dd0de5f38b20
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby Dave » Thu Feb 19, 2015 12:02 am

chi chi wrote:It's takes longer to defrost that block of frozen food than preparing something fresh.

Only if the frozen food requires defrost. Many don't. I have popped many frozen dishes from freezer to microwave, as instructed, and they came out perfect. And those which require defrost can always be defrosted by placing in the fridge the day before, so they are ready to go when needed. Pre-cooked, no 'preparation' involved. It's not a law of nature that convenience must be inversely proportional to quality.
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby Guiri » Thu Feb 19, 2015 11:14 am

Dave wrote:
chi chi wrote: It's not a law of nature that convenience must be inversely proportional to quality.

As fancy as it suppose to sound....I would disagree.
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby cmcarriemarie » Mon Mar 02, 2015 11:54 pm

Hey Dave, found the Italian place - around S/. 10-14 for a frozen Italian take home meal. Called Palacio de la Pasta, and it's at the corner of Arequipa and Republica de Colombia, in San Isidro. Delivery phone numbers: 440-5175 or 422-8561, email [email protected]. They either sell you frozen dinners to take home or they'll serve them there for you. I had the gnocchi a la crema de quesos and it was pretty good - their cheese sauce has blue cheese, which I love, but if you don't you should probably steer clear.

It's a bit expensive, but I'm definitely picking up a few for those nights when I get home late and just can't face the kitchen.
"Go confidently in the direction of your dreams. Live the life you have imagined." -Thoreau
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby Dave » Thu Mar 05, 2015 12:54 pm

Thanks for the info! I'll be checking that place out soon. :D
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby ironchefchris » Thu Mar 05, 2015 2:10 pm

cmcarriemarie wrote:Hey Dave, found the Italian place - around S/. 10-14 for a frozen Italian take home meal....It's a bit expensive, but I'm definitely picking up a few for those nights when I get home late and just can't face the kitchen.

That doesn't seem that expensive for a freshly made frozen meal from a local Italian restaurant compared to the frozen "Italian" meals from some big food food company/factory I just saw in the frozen section at Plaza Vea that cost S/. 15.
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Re: The Frozen Food Aisle

Postby cmcarriemarie » Fri Mar 06, 2015 12:24 am

You're probably right, IronChef - I think I was just comparing it to the amount of food you'd get for S/.10 for a menu, and it's a little smaller portion. Still, it's a pretty good deal overall, and the food is good in my opinion. :)
"Go confidently in the direction of your dreams. Live the life you have imagined." -Thoreau

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