S/. 3.250 pen

 

Jobs in Peru

1) Introduction to Living and Working Abroad
2) What to Consider for Living and Working Overseas
  A. Entry Requirements
  B. Researching the Lifestyle
  C. Employment Opportunites Abroad
3) Information on Living and Working in Peru
  A. Living in Peru
    I Currency
    II Wages
    III Living Expenses
    IV Bank Accounts
  B. Visa Requirements for Working in Peru
    I Tourist Visa » Workers Visa
    II Business Visa » Workers Visa
    III Further Information
  C. Searching for Jobs in Peru
    I Overseas Relocation
    II Peruvian Job-listings and Job Advertisements
  D. Career Options in Peru
    I Following Specific Career Paths
    II Teaching English
    III Language Institutes in Lima
    IV Translating and Interpreting
  E. Other Tips on Living and Working in Peru

1) Introduction to Living and Working Abroad

The decision to live and work abroad is far-reaching and exciting, but it can also be very daunting. The good news is that there is a wealth of information and advice available to guide you. Sources include internet websites (for example, http://www.shelteroffshore.com/index.php/living),  travel books and magazines. This article offers an overview of the practicalities and realities of living and working abroad in general, and in particular, of living and working in Peru.

2) What to Consider for Living and Working Overseas

A. Entry Requirements

Depending on the country you’re coming from and the country you’re planning to live and work in, you may be subject to entry restrictions. Contact the embassy of the country you plan to move to, live or work in to find out about the requirements you will have to fulfil to gain unrestricted entry. You can find the majority of embassies on the internet (http://www.embassyworld.com/). Or you can call, visit or write to the country’s embassy geographically nearest to you. See below for requirements for living and working in Peru.

B. Researching the Lifestyle

Once you believe you will obtain the required level of residency it is a good idea to start researching the housing, education and general standard and cost of living options that the destination offers you before you commit to living and working there. The forum section on this webpage is a good place to begin. (http://www.expatperu.com/expatforums/viewforum.php?f=1)

C. Employment Opportunites Abroad

Finding employment overseas is much easier once you’re in the destination country because then you can network and find out which agencies and newspapers advertise jobs in your particular sphere of expertise. But that is not to say you cannot start the process from home. Try searching on the internet for job-listings in your destination country to get an idea of the range of employment opportunites available and the wages they are offering. See below for specific information on job-listings and employment in Peru.

3) Information on Living and Working in Peru

A. Living in Peru

I Currency - The Peruvian currency is the Nuevo Sol. Currently (March 2013), there are around 4.00 Soles to the British Pound and 2.55 Soles to the US Dollar. However, exchange rates fluctuate constantly, so it’s best to check http://www.xe.com/ucc/full/ for the latest rates.

II Wages – The current (March 2013) minimum wage in Peru is approximately $235.00 per month. Teaching English with language institutes in Lima, however, can earn you at least $15-20 an hour ($1,500 per month if you work 5 hours a day). If you have teaching qualifications and ample experience you could earn a lot more working at international schools.

III Living Expenses – Your living expenses will naturally depend upon the lifestyle you lead. However, unless you seriously like to splash out, it is possible to live comfortably in Peru on a wage of $500 a month. 

IV Bank Accounts - In order to open most Peruvian bank accounts you need either a DNI (National ID Document - for Peruvian citizens only) or a foreign resident card (carné de extranjería) plus a copy of your electricity or water bill. However, Interbank (http://www.interbank.com.pe/) has been reputed to accept passports as an alternative to a DNI or foreign resident card. In addition, some language schools and institutes have connections and can open a bank account for you. Some banks will charge a maintenance fee if you have less than X in your account. Generally it’s better to open an account at a savings bank (caja).

B. Visa Requirements for Working in Peru

There is a great range of Peruvian visas, both temporary and resident. If you are a British, Irish or other EU national, a Canadian, American or Australian national and you want to work and live in Peru there are at least 2 ways you can go about fulfilling the visa requirements.

I Tourist Visa »Workers Visa

  • Enter Peru with a tourist visa. British, Irish and other EU nationals, nationals from Canada and USA, and nationals from Australia and New Zealand do not need to apply for a tourist visa when traveling as tourists to Peru. Tourist visas are simply obtained in the airport upon arrival in Peru or at Peruvian border crossings.They are given for a maximum of 183 days, although visas have been known to be as short as 30 days. You can tell the immigration officer upon entry that you would like to have the full 183 days, but the discretion lies with the officer.
  • Once you have found a job you can apply for a workers visa from the Peruvian General Directorate of Immigration and Naturalization, Avenida España 734, Breña, Lima, 330-4111 www.digemin.gob.pe

You will need:
Form F-004 – free
2 passport photographs
Receipt of payment (Banco de la Nación) of fee for the right to request a visa - S/. 94.60.
Valid passport and Andean Immigration Card (TAM) or valid foreign resident card (carné de extranjería)
International commercial exchange file (ficha de canje internacional) 
Receipt of payment (Banco de la Nación) for change of immigration status US $ 200.00
Annual foreign resident fee US $ 20.00 
Photocopy of work contract that has been approved by the company administrative authority, and legalized by a notary or authenticated by the Peruvian General Directorate of Immigration and Naturalization (DIGEMIN), for a period of up to one year (temporary visa) or a minimum of one year (resident visa) with the exception of cases outlined in Legislative Decree N° 689, its regulations and Supreme Decree N° 023-2001-TR.
In the case of a contract signed in Peru, the applicant must have a valid immigration status or have special permission to sign contracts.

  • The process can take a while depending on the specific case in hand. But please be wary of offers to speed-up the process in exchange for more money. Such offers are generally illicit and should be reported to the appropriate authorities.

II Business Visa » Workers Visa

  • Enter Peru with a business visa. Business visa holders can remain in Peru for up to 90 days. The requirements for obtaining business visas depend on the country you are travelling from. Contact the Peruvian embassy in that country for details.
  • Then, once you are in Peru, apply for the workers visa from the Peruvian General Directorate of Immigration and Naturalization, Avenida España 734, Breña, Lima, 330-4111 www.digemin.gob.pe

You will need:
Form F-004 – free
2 passport photographs
Receipt of payment (Banco de la Nación) of fee for the right to request a visa - S/. 26.00.
Valid passport and boarding and disembarkment card (TED) or valid foreign resident card (carné de extranjería)
International commercial exchange file (ficha de canje internacional) 
Receipt of payment (Banco de la Nación) for change of immigration status US $ 200.00
Annual foreign resident fee US $ 20.00 
Photocopy, either legalized by a notary or authenticated by the Peruvian General Directorate of Immigration and Naturalization (DIGEMIN), of the service contract between the foreign firm and the Peruvian person or firm receiving the service
Document designating the worker, issued by the foreign firm and legalized in the Peruvian Consulate and the Ministry of Foreign Relations, which indicates the period of time that the worker’s services will be required in Peru
If in a foreign (non-Spanish) language, the documents must be translated into Spanish by a certified translator

  • The advantage of entering the country with a business visa is that you do not need to acquire special permission to sign contracts before they can sign their employment contract.

Sources: Peruvian General Directorate of Immigration and Naturalization http://www.digemin.gob.pe/, Peruvian Consulate in the UK http://www.conperlondres.com/
Translation by www.expatperu.com.
"This translated version cannot be copied or republished in whole or in part without written consent from expatperu.com"

III Further Information - Please see the link ‘Peruvian Visas’ under the heading of ‘Info & Advice’ on the Expatperu homepage (http://www.expatperu.com/vrequirements.php) for more information regarding Peruvian visas. Other useful websites include:

Peruvian General Directorate of Immigration and Naturalization Lima www.digemin.gob.pe
Peruvian Consulate in the UK http://www.conperlondres.com/
Peruvian Embassy in the USA http://www.peruvianembassy.us/
Peruvian Embassy in Australia http://www.embaperu.org.au/
Peruvian Consulate in Canada http://www.consuladoperumontreal.com/

C. Searching for Jobs in Peru

I Overseas Relocation - Some expatriates are lucky enough to be relocated overseas by their employer, thus finding the search for work abroad very simple. But for those of us who are not quite so lucky, it is necessary to take a more proactive approach to finding overseas employment.

II Peruvian Job-listings and Job Advertisements - How can you go about looking for jobs in Peru? As indicated above, it is much easier to find employment overseas once you are in the destination country. But there are several Peruvian job-listings you can check from home. For example, try the new http://www.vende.pe/peru/trabajo or www.computrabajo.com.pe. Check these sites regularly because new jobs are posted every day. You can also check our own Peru job ads on ExpatPeru. Once you start living in Peru there are other sources open to you, for example advertisements in national newspapers, supermarkets and department stores. The national newspaper ‘El Comercio’ posts job-listings every Sunday. The sources that are best for you will naturally depend on your field of experience and your qualifications, but perhaps the most effective source of all is by word of mouth. Many people will ask why you have come to Peru; take advantage of the opportunity to promote yourself and explain what type of work you are looking for and why. Perhaps someone will be able to recommend a business in the line of work that interests you

D. Career Options in Peru

I Following Specific Career Paths - If you are hoping to follow a specific career path in Peru, the job options that are open to you will obviously depend on your particular level of experience and qualifications and also on the level of demand in Peru of that field of expertise. It is advisable to do as much research as possible before committing to working in Peru. Is there a great demand for your field of expertise? What are the wages like? Do you need any further qualifications to fulfil the requirements of such posts?

II Teaching English - Others are more flexible about their career options when deciding to live and work abroad. They wish to experience new fields of employment and new ways of living. One of the best ways of doing this is by teaching English abroad. Many expatriates in Peru teach English, or indeed other languages, with the numerous language schools and institutes. The more prestigious of these require teaching qualifications such as TEFL certificates (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) or PGCE’s (Postgraduate Certificate in Education), but for the majority what counts is that you are a native English speaker and not how many qualifications or how much experience you have. Most institutes offer both on-site and private lessons in pupils’ offices and houses. Some insitutes are better than others – some give you more pupils than others, some pay their teachers on time and some do not. It is best to ask other teachers about their experiences before accepting teaching positions.

Teach Peru is an organization that that arranges voluntary work placements in Huaraz and Lima. They have links to local schools and universities where you’ll work alongside Peruvian teachers as well as leading classes yourself. There are also opportunities to work in music and art colleges. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

III Language Institutes in Lima - A listing of some English language schools in South America, including a rather long section on Peru, can a be found here: http://www.eslcafe.com/forums/job/viewtopic.php?t=4556

IV Translating and Interpreting - As well as teaching English, if you speak Spanish you could also work as a translator or interpreter, either with one of the language schools or with a translation company.

E. Other Tips on Living and Working in Peru

  • Telephoning about a job offer will often get you a lot further than sending your CV via email, even if the job advertisement advises applicants to email their CV. Emails often go unread and unanswered. The best option is perhaps to telephone the company to notify them that you have emailed your CV.
  • Before accepting a job offer make sure you are clear on how much you will be paid, when you will be paid, how long the job will last for etc

Disclaimer: In practice, it is possible to work in Peru on a tourist visa, depending on the company and the type of job. However, Expatperu recommend complying with the official Peruvian immigration regulations and applying for a workers visa. Please note that the information in this article is offered only as a general introduction to Peruvian immigration regulations and not as an exhaustive guide to the intricacies of immigration law. The information should be correct as of June 2009, but immigration regulations change frequently and it is therefore essential that you do your own research rather than merely relying on this guide. Expatperu cannot be responsible for any problems that may result from failing to do so.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 

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