If you’re married to a Peruvian, it is possible – and not too complicated – for you to obtain Peruvian citizenship. There are several reasons why you might want to do this. The most common seems to be the ease of travel when passing through Peruvian immigration. However, for many expats that have made Peru their permanent home, there is also a desire to be a full fledged member of the society. And hey, not all marriages last, so being a citizen allows you to have a more secure position in the country, even if personal life plans don’t go as expected. Other benefits include not having to renew your Carné de Extranjeria every two years and, as a Peruvian citizen, you can also vote. Or rather, must vote, since the voting is an obligation here.  

So, if becoming a Peruvian citizen interests you, take note, and we’ll walk you through the steps.

Now, the very first thing you’ll want to before deciding apply for citizenship is to check whether or not your home country permits dual citizenship.  For example, as of writing, dual citizenship is either prohibited or restricted for citizens of China, the Netherlands, India, Germany and Japan, just to list a few examples. These rules are in constant flux, so be sure to research this point before getting started.

If you are a citizen of countries that allow dual citizenship, here is what you need to do to apply for Peruvian citizenship through marriage:

  • Form F-006 (click here to download).
  • Receipt from Banco de la Nación for payment of fee for the right to request Peruvian citizenship – S/.113.40.
  • An  original copy (no older than 30 days) of your acta de matrimonio civil (civil marriage certificate), inscribed in the respective civil registries of the Peruvian National Registry of Identification and Civil Status (RENIEC), showing that you’ve been married for at least 2 years.
    • If you got married in a foreign country, you will need an original copy of your marriage certificate (no older than 90 days). This certificate has to be registered in the oficina consular (consular office) of Peru in your country and it needs to be legalized by the Peruvian consulate and endorsed by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs or apostilled.
    • If you got married in a foreign country and didn’t register your certificate on time, you have 90 days after arriving in Peru to register your marriage. This has to be done in the civil registry of your municipality. If you don’t register your marriage during those 90 days, it will have to be done through court.
  • A valid Carné de Extranjería, and a legible copy of your passport.
  • A copy of the birth certificate of your Peruvian spouse, that has been legalized by a notary or authenticated by the Federatario de Migraciones (immigration office notary).
    • If the spouse has Peruvian nationality through naturalization, you should provide a copy of their corresponding naturalization certificate, called a Título de Registro.
  • A photocopy of the Peruvian spouse’s DNI. The address should be the same as the one provided by the applicant.
  • An affidavit of cohabitation, stating your address, that you are in good health and have no criminal or judicial records.
  • A Ficha de Canje Internacional (An international criminal record check) issued by the INTERPOL.
  • Proof of household income.

Once you submit your paperwork, and everything is in order, Migraciones promises to deliver your naturalization certificate, called, as we said before, a Título de Registro, in one month.  When it’s ready, you’ll have to sign the register, and pay a fee of S/. 35.00. At that time, it will be required to hand over your Carné de Extranjería. You can use your Título de Registro to obtain a DNI and Peruvian passport.   Please take the extra step to make a notarized copy of your Carné de Extranjeria before you hand it over.

Once you have your dual citizenship, you’ll use your Peruvian passport when passing in and out of Peru, and the passport from your home country when entering or leaving that country.

Congratulations!