Two Passports!

Answers to your qestions about moving to, and living in, Peru,
Europesweden
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Two Passports!

Postby Europesweden » Tue Mar 29, 2011 2:40 am

First of all, I would like to congratulate to the creators of this website. It is highly informative about different topics related to migrations in the broadest sense of the word.
This is my situation:
I was born in Peru, after finishing my studies in Lima, I emigrated to the United States, and recently I obtained my American Citizenship. Since, Peru allows dual citizenship, I have the American and the Peruvian citizenship.
I am thinking to visit Peru the next year, and I am wondering if it is possible to visit Peru just with my American passport? Will I have any sort of inconvenience if I don’t show my Peruvian passport in migrations? Or can I show my American passport in my visit Peru, without carrying the Peruvian passport?
Even though I’ll appreciate each answer related to this topic, It would be great if someone (with dual citizenship) can share with me his/her migratory experience.
Thanks and I would appreciate to read your comments!


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Kelly
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Re: Two Passports!

Postby Kelly » Tue Mar 29, 2011 6:33 am

You should use your Peruvian passport when entering/exiting Peru, and your US passport when entering exiting the US.
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Re: Two Passports!

Postby fernando.uk » Tue Mar 29, 2011 7:44 am

Hello Europesweden:
I describe my case: I am born and bred in Argentina, I have Spanish and Argentinian citizenship, when I travel to Peru for a few weeks for holidays I enter the country on my Spanish passport. Why? In case I am robbed of my travel documents (Murphy’s Law) I think it is much easier to deal with the Spanish consulate in Lima than their Argentinian counterpart (Let say bureaucracy) besides it is cheaper to replace a Spanish passport than an Argentinian one.
You should consider how long you intend to stay in Peru, I get three months stamp in my passport every time I visit Peru, which it is enough because I only spend a few weeks there. Perhaps you could get six months stay with your US documents, I do not know for sure, you should research on Peruvian Consulate website. If you plan to stay for longer or indefinitely you should enter the country as a Peruvian national. But remember something extremely important, you MUST enter and exit the country with the same passport.
I hope you find this information useful,
Kind Regards
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Re: Two Passports!

Postby zepol96 » Tue Mar 29, 2011 8:28 am

I also have dual citizenship and I reside in the USA. For many years I traveled to Peru with my US passport but my stay was always a short one (up to 60 days)and was usually granted a 60-day visa. A couple of years ago I needed to stay in Lima a bit longer (18 months) and for that reason I used my peruvian passport and was not subjected to any visa restrictions as a peruvian . Never had a problem entering /exiting Peru this way. Be aware that just like you are an american citizen while in the US, when in Peru you are considered a peruvian citizen regardless how you entered the country or which passport you used to come in. Your US passport indicates the place of birth and until you officially renounce your peruvian citizenship you will be considered a peruvian citizen while in Peru. Without a DNI you are considered an "undocumented" peruvian and will miss on the perks given to peruvians while traveling around the country.

If you already have a peruvian passport, you may want to obtain a DNI at the nearest peruvian consulate that should include your addres in the US to avoid been subjected to penalties for not participating in municipal elections. Once you get a DNI you are to participate in the peruvian presidential elections wherever you may reside. Hope I gave you something to work with for your next trip to Peru.
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Re: Two Passports!

Postby TechDude » Tue Mar 29, 2011 8:33 am

zepol96 wrote: ...Your US passport indicates the place of birth and until you officially renounce your peruvian citizenship you will be considered a peruvian citizen while in Peru.


I'm curious, what would they put on your passport as place of birth is you renounce?, how would the peruvian government know you renounced?.
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Re: Two Passports!

Postby Saramira222 » Tue Mar 29, 2011 10:05 am

I am also a dual citizen, and I always visited Peru with just my American passport in the past with no problem whatsoever. However, when I moved here I obtained my DNI and my Peruvian passport, and that way when I leave the country, they can't try to charge me for staying over the 90 or whatever days. However, unless you are planning to stay for a long period of time, I don't see any advantage to getting a Peruvian passport, and especially going through the hassle of getting a DNI, as someone suggested. I can't think of any benefit in having these documents when you are just here for a visit. If you are planning to stay for a long visit, then it would be worth it to have both passports.
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Re: Two Passports!

Postby Europesweden » Tue Mar 29, 2011 10:07 am

Thanks for your replies, I have a better idea about this topic. I have no problem with using my Peruvian passport, the problem is if I am going to endanger my U.S. citizenship, since American authorities will realize the lack of entry/exit stamp (from Peru) in my American passport. They might ask me about my trip, and why I don’t have those stamps in my passport. On the other hand, I don’t think it is good idea to explain to those U.S. Immigration officers about my “dual citizenship”. That’s the reason, I would like to travel to Peru or anywhere with one passport (The American).
I thought about renouncing the Peruvian citizenship (Since I don’t have any desire to live in Peru in the future), but I don’t know how long is the process, and how it would be the “reaction” from Peruvian authorities about the idea of a Peruvian citizen with the renounce of citizenship!
Again- I’m glad for your comments.
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Re: Two Passports!

Postby Saramira222 » Tue Mar 29, 2011 10:07 am

I forgot that the airlines charge foreigners an extra $178 when travelling within the country, so if you are planning to fly to various cities, it would save you money to have your Peruvian citizenship docs.
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Re: Two Passports!

Postby Kelly » Tue Mar 29, 2011 10:36 am

Europesweden wrote: the problem is if I am going to endanger my U.S. citizenship


This is not a problem - there is no danger in losing your US citizenship because you hold a Peruvian passport and use it to travel.
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Re: Two Passports!

Postby zepol96 » Tue Mar 29, 2011 1:06 pm

zepol96 wrote:
...Your US passport indicates the place of birth and until you officially renounce your peruvian citizenship you will be considered a peruvian citizen while in Peru.


TechDude wrote:
I'm curious, what would they put on your passport as place of birth is you renounce?, how would the peruvian government know you renounced?.



Your place of birth should never change in the american passport. To renounce your peruvian citizenship requires a long bureaucratic process that involves the peruvian consulate in the city you live, the Foreign Ministry (Relaciones Exteriores) in Lima and a bunch of additional paperwork demanded as needed by the bureaucrats in charge at that moment. Eventually, you may get a document that attest to you not being peruvian anymore. This document, I will call it "Sasquatch" ( we know it exists but nobody has actually seen it), may be the only proof that you are not a peruvian anymore. The question is ...what is the likelihood that anyone in authority in Peru believes in the authenticity of the document if they have never seen such a thing before? and now, withouth really trying you may be signing up for a great adventure thru the jungle of peruvian bureaucracy wishing, along the way, that you were born in Venezuela or Afghanistan.
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Re: Two Passports!

Postby jchambilla » Tue Mar 29, 2011 3:48 pm

Europesweden wrote:First of all, I would like to congratulate to the creators of this website. It is highly informative about different topics related to migrations in the broadest sense of the word.
This is my situation:
I was born in Peru, after finishing my studies in Lima, I emigrated to the United States, and recently I obtained my American Citizenship. Since, Peru allows dual citizenship, I have the American and the Peruvian citizenship.
I am thinking to visit Peru the next year, and I am wondering if it is possible to visit Peru just with my American passport? Will I have any sort of inconvenience if I don’t show my Peruvian passport in migrations? Or can I show my American passport in my visit Peru, without carrying the Peruvian passport?
Even though I’ll appreciate each answer related to this topic, It would be great if someone (with dual citizenship) can share with me his/her migratory experience.
Thanks and I would appreciate to read your comments!


I'm peruvian, my wife from US. As you we were worried about puting at risk her US citizenship, so we went to US embassy here in Lima, we ask them if would be a problem for my wife to get a peruvian citizenship (because she is married with a peruvian) and they said that there is not a problem.

Hope that can help you decide

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Re: Two Passports!

Postby Retired in Lima » Tue Mar 29, 2011 4:24 pm

zepol96 wrote:I also have dual citizenship and I reside in the USA. For many years I traveled to Peru with my US passport but my stay was always a short one (up to 60 days)and was usually granted a 60-day visa. A couple of years ago I needed to stay in Lima a bit longer (18 months) and for that reason I used my peruvian passport and was not subjected to any visa restrictions as a peruvian . Never had a problem entering /exiting Peru this way. Be aware that just like you are an american citizen while in the US, when in Peru you are considered a peruvian citizen regardless how you entered the country or which passport you used to come in. Your US passport indicates the place of birth and until you officially renounce your peruvian citizenship you will be considered a peruvian citizen while in Peru. Without a DNI you are considered an "undocumented" peruvian and will miss on the perks given to peruvians while traveling around the country.

If you already have a peruvian passport, you may want to obtain a DNI at the nearest peruvian consulate that should include your addres in the US to avoid been subjected to penalties for not participating in municipal elections. Once you get a DNI you are to participate in the peruvian presidential elections wherever you may reside. Hope I gave you something to work with for your next trip to Peru.

Excellent,informative reply!
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Re: Two Passports!

Postby Europesweden » Tue Mar 29, 2011 5:40 pm

Very good comments!
As far as I understood for your comments. There is no any “danger” of losing the U.S. Citizenship, if I use my Peruvian passport for traveling. Is the same with the presidential election vote? Honestly, I am not thinking in the future to vote for Peruvians elections, but I was curious about this fact. On the other hand, it seems that there is no way to eliminate your “birth of place” from your U.S. passport!
By the way, I haven’t been in Peru for 9 years….How much has Peru changed? or there has been no change at all? Are taxis safer? How is Lima now?
Thanks for your awesome comments!
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Re: Two Passports!

Postby zepol96 » Tue Mar 29, 2011 7:42 pm

Europesweden wrote:Very good comments!
As far as I understood for your comments. There is no any “danger” of losing the U.S. Citizenship, if I use my Peruvian passport for traveling. Is the same with the presidential election vote? Honestly, I am not thinking in the future to vote for Peruvians elections, but I was curious about this fact. On the other hand, it seems that there is no way to eliminate your “birth of place” from your U.S. passport!
By the way, I haven’t been in Peru for 9 years….How much has Peru changed? or there has been no change at all? Are taxis safer? How is Lima now?
Thanks for your awesome comments!


I have not lived in Peru for 40 years but I visit regularly, so I can say that at least Lima has changed quite a bit over that period of time. However, the changes you may notice after 9 years away from the barrio are the increased number of restaurants, combis, tourists and delinquents...but in reality the biggest change is yourself. You may struggle to re-adapt to the old customs as soon as you deplane at Jorge Chavez. We, the "repatriados", have to make great efforts not to act foreigner-like (using english words in your conversation, picking up the bar bill, wearing your AEROPOSTALE threads, and so on) etc Ignore the need to complaint about anything and everything not done like in the States. While in Peru adopt a laissez faire attitude ...let little annoyances roll off your back, go with the flow and enjoy your stay. You may end up having a hell of a good time in Peru. Good tripping.

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