Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

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danielsdad0
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Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby danielsdad0 » Mon Jan 02, 2012 1:15 am

I married my Peruvian wife almost 11 years ago. Since then, my wife has become an ESL (English Second Language)teacher for 7+years. We first traveled together to Peru in 2001 and returned to Peru in 2005. We have 2 sons, ages 10 and 8.I have dreamt of moving to Peru since my first visit. My wife has the opportunity to be an English teacher there, but I (as a 41 year-old white male) don't have many options for employment (from what I have heard). My Spanish is not too bad since I have lived in Texas for most of my life and because, at home,I am immursed in Spanish due to my wife, mother-in-law, and kids speaking only in Spanish.
I REEEAAALLLYYYY want to move to Peru and open a Tex-Mex Sports Bar!!
Dreams are one thing and practicality is another, I know.
When I was there, I saw many little bar/rastaurants that were attached to the owners house. This is very appealing to me in that I won't need to rent/lease/buy another location for my business other than my home.
Can anyone give me any advice about opening a small cantina/grill at my own home? Will the zoning in particular parts of Lima (or Peru at a whole) prevent me from opening a small bar?
Any insight into this would be greatly appreciated!

(BTW, I would like to move to Peru in less than one year)


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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby lizzym » Mon Jan 02, 2012 3:53 pm

TEX-MEXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX!!!

Advice: Open it near me :D I will personally fund your stay in Lima. lol

Hope you find all the info you need to make it happen. :)
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby lizzym » Mon Jan 02, 2012 4:01 pm

Actually, if you would consider areas outside of Miraflores et al., I heard that the Boulevard in Los Olivos just got permanently shut down by the mayor. I suspect that leaves a lot of North Cone "pitucos" without a place to spend their money on the weekends.
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby chi chi » Mon Jan 02, 2012 5:04 pm

It's nice to have a dream but if you don't want your dream to become a nightmare then read the following.
I worked in restaurants before and I know the restaurant business very well.

Did you ever work in a restaurant before?

If not then I suggest that you first work in a restaurant and gain experience. Also a descent knowledge of Spanish is required and work experience in Peru is higly recommended. If you don't know the business and/or the language then you will most likely fail.
You must know every part of the business. Also you must find out where to buy equipment, food and be able to negotiate hard with providers and check that they don't scam you. If you are a new gringo in town who doesn't speak Spanish then you will be cheated. 100% guarantee.

Providers and staff will cheat and steal from you. If people can scam you in Peru, then they will.

If you can't cook then learn it. If your chef is off sick or resign and can't find a replacement then YOU must be able to work in the kitchen. Otherwise you have to close your door and will lose a lot of money.
Punctual, reliable and honest staff are very tough to find for the restaurant business and the wages for staff are very low.

The restaurant business, is a business where you have to work hard. Very hard. And profit margins are very low. Expect to work 7 days a week and up to 16 hours a day.
Competition is very tough too.

I don't want to put you of your plan. There are many gringos that own restaurants in Peru. Most of them failed, some succeeded. But if they succeeded then it because of good preparation and hard work.
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby falconagain » Mon Jan 02, 2012 5:09 pm

Opening a restaurant in Peru is a very risky investment. Right now due to the
boom of the Peruvian food the whole country is full of restaurants. A few of
them fully operating. But the majority of them vacant or kept in the books for
money laundering. Besides that Peruvians are not very open to other kinds of
foods, this is why most of the new opening are Pollerias, Cevicherias or
Comida Criolla (or a combination of all three). It is very unlikely that tex
mex food will be accepted. Being Peruvian and having a very big extended
family I assure that the majority either dislike this food or will not eat it.

Besides that I think that TEXAS has a brighter future than PERU.
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby rama0929 » Mon Jan 02, 2012 5:11 pm

Go for it! As my friend Desiree says;

"hola!!! la verdad aqui en peru cualcuier negocio que sea con comida progresa solo hay que tener una buena zason , limpieza y atencion !!! yo te recomendaria un vale todo osea hamburgursas,pollo broster, jugos ,etc....."

Good food and a clean place with good service, that's all you need, at least according to her :D
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby chi chi » Mon Jan 02, 2012 5:30 pm

rama0929 wrote:Go for it! As my friend Desiree says;

"hola!!! la verdad aqui en peru cualcuier negocio que sea con comida progresa solo hay que tener una buena zason , limpieza y atencion !!! yo te recomendaria un vale todo osea hamburgursas,pollo broster, jugos ,etc....."

Good food and a clean place with good service, that's all you need, at least according to her :D


What your friend says is right.

But the OP doesn't speak spanish. Probably no restaurant experience and no business experience in Peru. Starting up a restaurant takes a lot of preparation. Be prepared not to make money in the beginning for some time. Business generally picks up slow. Check out what competitors do in the area. Check out where to buy your products and equipment. Interract with your customers and staff. (but as the OP doesn't speak Spanish, that will be impossible)

Also the OP want to sell TEXMEX food. Like falconagain stated, this food will be very hard to sell in Peru. Foreign food (apart from chifa) isn't popular in Peru.
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby rama0929 » Mon Jan 02, 2012 6:08 pm

chi chi wrote:Also the OP want to sell TEXMEX food. Like falconagain stated, this food will be very hard to sell in Peru. Foreign food (apart from chifa) isn't popular in Peru.


Tony Romas, Papa Johns, Dominos, McDonalds, Burger King, Chilis, TGIFridays & Pizza Hut are all chains that have a presence in Peru.

As I've mentioned before, there are taquerias and burrito spots in Los Olivos. Saw a churrascaria there as well. Plaza Norte has a taco spot as well as a creperie. I'm sure there is room for a well presented Tex-Mex restaurant. Doesn't have to be anything fancy; a good number of menu places are quite spartan; a few tables, a caja and the kitchen area.
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby chi chi » Mon Jan 02, 2012 6:18 pm

rama0929 wrote:
chi chi wrote:Also the OP want to sell TEXMEX food. Like falconagain stated, this food will be very hard to sell in Peru. Foreign food (apart from chifa) isn't popular in Peru.


Tony Romas, Papa Johns, Dominos, McDonalds, Burger King, Chilis, TGIFridays & Pizza Hut are all chains that have a presence in Peru.


It took for the above businesses years before they got succesfull in Peru.
Those chains have a lot of money and they can afford to lose a lot of money in the beginning. The investment of one of the chain restaurants are huge. The invested probably millions and spended probably another few millions in publicity through the years.

Also the OP doesn't speak spanish and probably has no restaurant experience. It sounds like a mission impossible.

Be aware that most new restaurants fail. Most succesfull restaurant owners failed one or more times. But they learned from their mistakes.
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby rama0929 » Mon Jan 02, 2012 6:23 pm

chi chi wrote:
Also the OP doesn't speak spanish and probably has no restaurant experience. It sounds like a mission impossible.


danielsdad0 wrote: My Spanish is not too bad since I have lived in Texas for most of my life and because, at home,I am immursed in Spanish due to my wife, mother-in-law, and kids speaking only in Spanish.


The Spanish part is fine. He's surrounded by Spanish speaking family members. He'll be fine.

Running a restaurant is difficult, but it isn't rocket science.

danielsdad0 will be fine.
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby Kelly » Mon Jan 02, 2012 6:26 pm

chi chi wrote:Also the OP doesn't speak spanish


I'm not sure why you insist on repeating that when the OP says that his Spanish is "Not bad" because he lives immersed in it.

I think the poster is actually looking more for information on zoning regulations and such. To that end, I'll move this over to the business forum.
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby chi chi » Mon Jan 02, 2012 6:51 pm

Kelly wrote:
chi chi wrote:Also the OP doesn't speak spanish


I'm not sure why you insist on repeating that when the OP says that his Spanish is "Not bad" because he lives immersed in it.

I think the poster is actually looking more for information on zoning regulations and such. To that end, I'll move this over to the business forum.


Ok, I've read it again. If his spanish is OK then it will be great advantage.
The thing is that he should gain restaurant experience by working for some time in a restaurant before committing himself to starting up a business. This is tough business.

Regarding to zoning laws, it all depend of where you want to run the business.
As usual in Lima they are strict to very strict.

In the provices there's more room for flexibility.

Running a business from your home will be easier in the provinces and outside the big cities.
Here in La Selva many people put a few tables in front of their home or in their garage and run a restaurant.
Almost non of them has a licence and a licence isn't required.
Inside the big cities a licence is required.

One of neigboors runs a restaurant from the first floor of her home and has no licence and a licence wasn't required for that area.

But I suggest always to contact the local municipalidad before starting up a business whether a licence is required or not. Don't listen to what 'the people' say.
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby hoyce » Mon Jan 02, 2012 8:05 pm

you know one of the reasons i was excited to move to my neighborhood was because on google maps it showed a mexican restaurant sports bar a short walk away. a week later i head down there and its a beautiful building, but i come to find out it went out of business after a year. i would have spent all my money there since i live off mexican food. i've asked a few people why it failed and the answer i universally get is "customs"; it's just not there custom to eat that stuff.

i suppose could be fine in a touristy spot, but i'm not sure peruvians will pay for it. i wish you luck though. i know it sounds gay, but i'd consider setting up a grill in an area with a lot of foot traffic and try to sell tacos and quesadillas without even trying to make a profit. just to see if the people like it.

i cant believe they prefer these chicken-less sandwiches and stuffed potato whatever over a simple and cheap taco. when i finally did find a mexican restaurant i ordered a burrito and the lady asked if i wanted cream. i said yess thinking sour cream - wrong! it was a burrito filled with mayo :(
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby chi chi » Mon Jan 02, 2012 9:48 pm

hoyce wrote: when i finally did find a mexican restaurant i ordered a burrito and the lady asked if i wanted cream. i said yess thinking sour cream - wrong! it was a burrito filled with mayo :(


Normally, you say: 'Ihave to see to believe it'. But often in Peru when you see it, you won't believe it either'.
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby falconagain » Mon Jan 02, 2012 11:03 pm

chi chi wrote:
rama0929 wrote:
chi chi wrote:Also the OP want to sell TEXMEX food. Like falconagain stated, this food will be very hard to sell in Peru. Foreign food (apart from chifa) isn't popular in Peru.


Tony Romas, Papa Johns, Dominos, McDonalds, Burger King, Chilis, TGIFridays & Pizza Hut are all chains that have a presence in Peru.


It took for the above businesses years before they got succesfull in Peru.
Those chains have a lot of money and they can afford to lose a lot of money in the beginning. The investment of one of the chain restaurants are huge. The invested probably millions and spended probably another few millions in publicity through the years.

Also the OP doesn't speak spanish and probably has no restaurant experience. It sounds like a mission impossible.

Be aware that most new restaurants fail. Most succesfull restaurant owners failed one or more times. But they learned from their mistakes.


Yes, is true it took many years and huge loses to make a dent in the Peruvian market. These companies
are multinationals and can afford to keep businesses operating at loss. But I do not think that the average
foreign restaurant investor would like to have an average loss of a couple of million dollars yearly until the
Peruvian market notices him.

Outback and Subway tried years ago to keep a presence in Lima. But they lost so much money in the process
that they had to close. I am aware that Subway has returned, lets see if they survive this time.

Tony Romas has gone bankrupt more than 3 times and changed owners several times.
Papa Johns and Dominos did not have many customers when they started, and actually they
had to commission a research study and changed all their recipes to have certain degree of Peruvian
flavor. Still it took them at least a couple of years to operate without losses.
McDonalds, Burger King, Pizza Hut, KFC are owned indirectly by the government but still they difficulty
with the heavy competition from some Peruvian restaurants. For example all these huge companies have
a presence in San Miguel close to Av La Marina. Still according to market studies on that area the
restaurant that has most customers and the main competition of these chains is KIOS (an Asian owned
sandwich place that sells a great pork sandwich for $2.50 beats all multinational on a daily basis).
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby rama0929 » Tue Jan 03, 2012 7:24 am

So then all he needs to do is adapt Tex-Mex to Peru. Again, not that big a deal.

The point is that saying "Peruvians don't eat alternative foods" is nonsense and the proof lies in the many places around Lima that aren't pollerias or chifas.
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby sbaustin » Tue Jan 03, 2012 8:08 am

I happen to agree that in general Peruvian prefer to eat Peruvian food.. I've met plenty that wouldn't eat anything else even if given the opportunity.. This doesn't mean there aren't plenty that do..

Regardless, any type of international food can be successful and some of the difficulty is:

1. Getting beyond the menu mentality of eating for S/5,S/8,S/12 depending on where you are. I know that Guru offered a menu when they first opened.. Thankfully they were able to get past that but I'm sure it took a little while.
2. Opening any business in Peru is extremely difficult..You should expect it to be 10 times harder than you think.
3. Finding good people is even worse especially if as an owner you have high expectations for your staff. I'm willing to bet that most expats here have had sub par restaurant experiences 90% of the time if you compare them to USA standards.
4. If your Spanish isn't at the fluent level you will have to rely on others for communication at all levels to avoid problems.
5. Location Location Location - finding a good one in the real estate market now is not going to be cheap.

There are several TexMex and Mexican places in Lima.. You should check them out when you are here and see how they run/etc.
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby americorps » Tue Jan 03, 2012 9:33 am

rama0929 wrote:So then all he needs to do is adapt Tex-Mex to Peru. Again, not that big a deal.

The point is that saying "Peruvians don't eat alternative foods" is nonsense and the proof lies in the many places around Lima that aren't pollerias or chifas.


Actually, you are not telling the entire picture.

McDonalds, Pizza Hut, Burger King, Domino's, Papa Johns have all altered their recipes to reflect the Peruvian flavors. The burger joints do not serve pure beef burgers because Peruvians do not like them. The pizza places have also altered their models including less garlic, less tomato sauce and not bothering with Parmesan cheese.

Tony Roma's, TGI Fridays and Chile's have all added standard Peruvian fare to their menu's out of necessity.

The Thai restaurant in Chacarilla uses Peruvian spices not from lack of availability, but because they struggled when they were more authentic.

Being of Mexican heritage, and having lived in Mexico, I understand Mexican food and have tried many of the taco shops and Mexican places and by and large they do not taste like anything I have eaten in Mexico, with the exception of the Mole at Como Agua Para Chocolate.

It is adapt or die in Peru as they are very nationalistic about their flavors.

And to SBAustin, I think that is clear and accurate advice.
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby chi chi » Tue Jan 03, 2012 10:08 am

sbaustin wrote:I happen to agree that in general Peruvian prefer to eat Peruvian food.. I've met plenty that wouldn't eat anything else even if given the opportunity.. This doesn't mean there aren't plenty that do..

Regardless, any type of international food can be successful and some of the difficulty is:

1. Getting beyond the menu mentality of eating for S/5,S/8,S/12 depending on where you are.


If you have little money to lose then opening a menu restaurant is your best bet.
Menu places do well. They tend to have a lot regular customers.

Also the working hours are better. Most menu places only open for lunch.

Sell menu from monday through saturday and ceviche on sunday.

Any foreign food place demands a high investment and most likely will fail.
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby sbaustin » Tue Jan 03, 2012 11:30 am

americorps wrote:
rama0929 wrote:
McDonalds, Pizza Hut, Burger King, Domino's, Papa Johns have all altered their recipes to reflect the Peruvian flavors. The burger joints do not serve pure beef burgers because Peruvians do not like them. The pizza places have also altered their models including less garlic, less tomato sauce and not bothering with Parmesan cheese.

Tony Roma's, TGI Fridays and Chile's have all added standard Peruvian fare to their menu's out of necessity.

The Thai restaurant in Chacarilla uses Peruvian spices not from lack of availability, but because they struggled when they were more authentic.



This is all pretty standard and has nothing to do with Peru. McDonalds has local menu items all over the world as do many other chains.

As for a tex mex sports bar, I'm guessing you will not be in Miraflores or San Isidro where they are much more strict with regards to this type of stuff ? This means local sports, local beers, and probably local food although who knows as there is a taco place in San Miguel on Precursores that seems to be similar to what you may want to do... You guys need to come and scope out different areas and inquire.
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby chi chi » Tue Jan 03, 2012 11:50 am

danielsdad0 wrote:I REEEAAALLLYYYY want to move to Peru and open a Tex-Mex Sports Bar!!

When I was there, I saw many little bar/rastaurants that were attached to the owners house. This is very appealing to me in that I won't need to rent/lease/buy another location for my business other than my home.


sbaustin wrote:As for a tex mex sports bar, I'm guessing you will not be in Miraflores or San Isidro where they are much more strict with regards to this type of stuff ?


As the OP want to runs a place from his home, it will be a impossible in San Isidro or Miraflores. Most buildings are flat buildings and the few houses there are in Miraflores, running a restaurant from them won't get a licence from the municipalidad.
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby sbaustin » Tue Jan 03, 2012 12:01 pm

chi chi wrote:
As the OP want to runs a place from his home, it will be a impossible in San Isidro or Miraflores. Most buildings are flat buildings and the few houses there are in Miraflores, running a restaurant from them won't get a licence from the municipalidad.


It is not impossible, they aren't that many in MF however there is a small restaurant on the block where I live that is part house part restaurant. My biggest fear outside these areas where there are many expats that would frequent a tex mex place would be that most smaller neighborhoods probably can't support a Tex Mex bar to the degree that the OP may want with regards to income vs hours worked(in my opinion) although like I said, there are places I've seen like the one on Precursores. Fortunately the investment is small if you work out of your house so you wouln't lose much, on the other hand you probably won't make much money either.


** edit
I'm pretty sure the place by my depo is legit because sunat and the municipalidad comes around a few times a year and closes the bodegas down but the restaurant has never closed so I assume they are on the up and up.
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby thisisluca » Tue Jan 03, 2012 1:14 pm

mmm a tex mex restaurant sounds amazing ... tho i must tell you in barranco theres this place called Burrito bar run by an american that does pretty well doing tex mex food so competition is always good, man.
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby thisisluca » Tue Jan 03, 2012 1:20 pm

most peruvians dont go out and eat peruvian food cuz thats what u have at home... thats why there are alot of fast foods as mentioned above ... just think very well what you wanna do . it's true it's risky but if you do it great it will sell cuz as a peruvian i am most places that sell food in this city are gross ... and the service is awful so if you sell good food and offer good service then you'll find a way to make it
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby chi chi » Wed Jan 04, 2012 6:23 pm

danielsdad0 wrote:I married my Peruvian wife almost 11 years ago.
I have dreamt of moving to Peru since my first visit. My wife has the opportunity to be an English teacher there, but I (as a 41 year-old white male) don't have many options for employment (from what I have heard). My Spanish is not too bad


Many foreigners think that teaching English is the only job available to them. Remember, most foreigners who live in Peru don't speak English. And most of those people have a job.

In your case, you are married to a Peruvian and can easily get a CE and you will have the right to work in Peru and can do any job you want to do.

That you speak spanish is good advantage.

Look at http://www.elcomercio.pe and look at the job offers or buy Elcomercio on Sunday.
It will be very unlikely that there's no joboffer at all that's suitable for you.

If you can cook then you will easily find a job. Cooks are high in demand. And you said that you wanted to open a restaurant, then I suggest you first gain working experience in a restaurant in Peru. Business is done different here than in Dallas.

http://aptitus.pe/buscar/page/3/query/cocinero#anclaPag



Yesterday, I met an American. He's spanish is reasonable but far from perfect. He works in a carpinteria and had no previous experience prior to starting the job. He learned the work on the job. And I guess he's around 45 years old.
He told me that he lost his job and his home in the US due to the crisis and came to Peru 2 years ago to start a new life.
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby rama0929 » Thu Jan 05, 2012 1:39 am

thisisluca wrote:most peruvians dont go out and eat peruvian food cuz thats what u have at home... thats why there are alot of fast foods as mentioned above ... just think very well what you wanna do . it's true it's risky but if you do it great it will sell cuz as a peruvian i am most places that sell food in this city are gross ... and the service is awful so if you sell good food and offer good service then you'll find a way to make it


As per an earlier post

rama0929 wrote:Go for it! As my friend Desiree says;

"hola!!! la verdad aqui en peru cualcuier negocio que sea con comida progresa solo hay que tener una buena zason , limpieza y atencion !!! yo te recomendaria un vale todo osea hamburgursas,pollo broster, jugos ,etc....."

Good food and a clean place with good service, that's all you need, at least according to her :D


FWIW, I cook for friends when I get there, they love the stuff I throw together. Some of them like the spices I bring down from the states, stuff like Old Bay, Montreal Chicken and Montreal Steak Seasonings, dry rubs, bbq sauces and marinades, etc, etc, etc.

I see no reason why a Tex Mex cantina wouldn't go over well. Danielsdad, let us know when you open, I'll send a bunch of people over to sample your wares. Heck, if you need a test audience, let me know :lol:
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby chi chi » Thu Jan 05, 2012 8:45 pm

falconagain wrote: Peruvians are not very open to other kinds of
foods, this is why most of the new opening are Pollerias, Cevicherias or
Comida Criolla (or a combination of all three). It is very unlikely that tex
mex food will be accepted. Being Peruvian and having a very big extended
family I assure that the majority either dislike this food or will not eat it.


It's possible to get Peruvians eat foreign food but you have to force them.
I make often foreign food. All the time, I want to make foreign food, it starts with a hefty discussion. She
says that she's not going to eat that strange food. But at the end she eats more than I of it and asks me to prepare it the next day again.
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby falconagain » Sat Jan 07, 2012 10:09 pm

In order to see what kind of foods Peruvians eat, you just need to go to
your local market. Based on the variety of items you will notice that the
selection is limited only to what Peruvians eat and that they do not cook
anything else this is the reason why all franchises import a great part
of food supply from abroad because there is no local Production available.
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby rama0929 » Tue Jan 10, 2012 7:04 pm

americorps wrote:
rama0929 wrote:So then all he needs to do is adapt Tex-Mex to Peru. Again, not that big a deal.

The point is that saying "Peruvians don't eat alternative foods" is nonsense and the proof lies in the many places around Lima that aren't pollerias or chifas.


Actually, you are not telling the entire picture.

McDonalds, Pizza Hut, Burger King, Domino's, Papa Johns have all altered their recipes to reflect the Peruvian flavors. The burger joints do not serve pure beef burgers because Peruvians do not like them. The pizza places have also altered their models including less garlic, less tomato sauce and not bothering with Parmesan cheese.

Tony Roma's, TGI Fridays and Chile's have all added standard Peruvian fare to their menu's out of necessity.

The Thai restaurant in Chacarilla uses Peruvian spices not from lack of availability, but because they struggled when they were more authentic.


Doesn't change what I wrote above;
rama0929 wrote:So then all he needs to do is adapt Tex-Mex to Peru. Again, not that big a deal.

The point is that saying "Peruvians don't eat alternative foods" is nonsense and the proof lies in the many places around Lima that aren't pollerias or chifas.
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby Boris and Elena Bell » Wed Jan 11, 2012 12:14 am

chi chi wrote:It's nice to have a dream but if you don't want your dream to become a nightmare then read the following.
I worked in restaurants before and I know the restaurant business very well.

Did you ever work in a restaurant before?

If not then I suggest that you first work in a restaurant and gain experience. Also a descent knowledge of Spanish is required and work experience in Peru is higly recommended. If you don't know the business and/or the language then you will most likely fail.
You must know every part of the business. Also you must find out where to buy equipment, food and be able to negotiate hard with providers and check that they don't scam you. If you are a new gringo in town who doesn't speak Spanish then you will be cheated. 100% guarantee.

Providers and staff will cheat and steal from you. If people can scam you in Peru, then they will.

If you can't cook then learn it. If your chef is off sick or resign and can't find a replacement then YOU must be able to work in the kitchen. Otherwise you have to close your door and will lose a lot of money.
Punctual, reliable and honest staff are very tough to find for the restaurant business and the wages for staff are very low.

The restaurant business, is a business where you have to work hard. Very hard. And profit margins are very low. Expect to work 7 days a week and up to 16 hours a day.
Competition is very tough too.

I don't want to put you of your plan. There are many gringos that own restaurants in Peru. Most of them failed, some succeeded. But if they succeeded then it because of good preparation and hard work.


Sobering advice indeed..
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby chi chi » Wed Jan 11, 2012 1:16 pm

Boris and Elena Bell wrote:Sobering advice indeed..


There are many people like Danielsdad that are motivated and have high hopes of starting a business in Peru.

Rents and starting up costs are much lower than in Europe or the US. Many people think that they can make good profits.

But often forget that you have to sell your products much cheaper. Also selling foreign food is hard. Most Peruvians don't like foreign food. There's a possibility but it take time and will cost a lot of money.


Companies like McDonalds, Papa Johns and Chillis run well in Peru but those companies have lost millions in the beginning before they broke through in the market.

I would say. If you want to go ahead. Do it. But don't invest more money than you can afford to lose.
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby MarcoPE » Wed Jan 11, 2012 4:04 pm

chi chi wrote:
Boris and Elena Bell wrote:Sobering advice indeed..


There are many people like Danielsdad that are motivated and have high hopes of starting a business in Peru.

Rents and starting up costs are much lower than in Europe or the US. Many people think that they can make good profits.

But often forget that you have to sell your products much cheaper. Also selling foreign food is hard. Most Peruvians don't like foreign food. There's a possibility but it take time and will cost a lot of money.


Companies like McDonalds, Papa Johns and Chillis run well in Peru but those companies have lost millions in the beginning before they broke through in the market.

I would say. If you want to go ahead. Do it. But don't invest more money than you can afford to lose.


Sadly, and as much as I REALLY hate to admit it, Chi Chi/Euroman/El Conquistador (IN THIS ONE INSTANCE) is right :cry:
Business isn't really that easy in Peru. I see a Chifa (chifa is already integrated to Peruvian food) restaurant every single day that, in my opinion, has the best Chifa in all of Lima, and they sit empty.

I know Rama would like for you to open, as would I (a former resident of Texas)....but honestly, you can't survive here on expats alone....

but, whatever you decide to do, I wish you the best of luck.... you will need it.
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby chi chi » Wed Jan 11, 2012 9:22 pm

MarcoPE wrote:I know Rama would like for you to open, as would I (a former resident of Texas)....but honestly, you can't survive here on expats alone....


It's also that expats are not eating everyday foreign food either.

Most expats eat Peruvian food everyday and prepare food at home.
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby chi chi » Wed Jan 11, 2012 9:25 pm

If you really want to try to sell something new then the following could be a challenge:

http://elcomercio.pe/gastronomia/135967 ... estro-yoda
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby rama0929 » Thu Jan 12, 2012 8:02 am

MarcoPE wrote:
Sadly, and as much as I REALLY hate to admit it, Chi Chi/Euroman/El Conquistador (IN THIS ONE INSTANCE) is right :cry:
Business isn't really that easy in Peru. I see a Chifa (chifa is already integrated to Peruvian food) restaurant every single day that, in my opinion, has the best Chifa in all of Lima, and they sit empty.

I know Rama would like for you to open, as would I (a former resident of Texas)....but honestly, you can't survive here on expats alone....


He puts together a decent product, he won't have to.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Houlihan ... 826?ref=ts
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby chi chi » Fri Jan 13, 2012 12:23 pm

MarcoPE wrote:Business isn't really that easy in Peru. I see a Chifa (chifa is already integrated to Peruvian food) restaurant every single day that, in my opinion, has the best Chifa in all of Lima, and they sit empty.


Often if a place looks too nice and clean then it scares of people.

I know several restaurant and refrigerios that are very clean and look modern but have very few customers although they charge the same prices as the others. But the other restaurants are dirty and don't look nice but they are always full of customers.
If a place look nice and clean then people think it's expensive so nobody enters.

In Peru, people want to go to the cheapest place. No matter if it's clean or not.

Last year a nice restaurant opened in the center of Tarapoto. A Clean and modern restaurant but they were selling menu for 4 soles. They had no customers because when people saw the price they said ''mucho'' or ''muy caro'' or ''¿nada menos?
It was impossible to get customers because competitors were asking 3.50 soles for a menu. The competitors were people who put a few tables on the street and cooked on the street.
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby rama0929 » Fri Jan 13, 2012 4:16 pm

That's why he should set up shop in Lima instead of Tarapoto
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby falconagain » Sat Jan 14, 2012 7:23 pm

That is completely right Peruvians think that restaurants in bad condition
are a source of good food. For example there is two restaurants near the
Julio C. Tello towers in San Miguel, they have exactly the same menu with
a good flavor for both. One of them is a restaurant by the book which means
clean floor, outstanding installations, the personnel is well dressed, the whole
nine yards. This is the place that is actually struggling to keep itself open.
The other restaurant is 10 times smaller, but it actually has a line of people
everyday, monday through saturday. and they are only open Monday through
Saturday 1 to 10 pm. Even with the success of that place the owner told me
that he is thinking of selling everything and going to Australia because the
margins are very small (5 soles a menu) and the worked involved to keep
the place is brutal.
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby sbaustin » Mon Jan 16, 2012 5:56 pm

falconagain wrote:the
margins are very small (5 soles a menu) and the worked involved to keep
the place is brutal.


It is hard to sell good quality food and service when you have to compete solely on price. I think all and all Peruvians (not all) focus on price for 95% of the sale and service/quality/etc are a distant second... Just an observation with regards to some commercial transactions such as food and clothing. Not really a critique in any way.
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby chi chi » Wed Jan 18, 2012 5:55 pm

sbaustin wrote:
falconagain wrote:the
margins are very small (5 soles a menu) and the worked involved to keep
the place is brutal.


It is hard to sell good quality food and service when you have to compete solely on price. I think all and all Peruvians (not all) focus on price for 95% of the sale and service/quality/etc are a distant second... Just an observation with regards to some commercial transactions such as food and clothing. Not really a critique in any way.



I also noticed that Peruvians are loyal to their 'menu restaurant'. It's like hairdressers, they have their regular customer base.
When I pass around lunch time some menu places, I always see the same people eating there.

When we lived in Lima and had our business, at weekends we didn't have time to cook ourselves as we had too much work and we always asked the same menu restaurant to deliver our lunch to our business.

New and clean restaurants were popping up in the neigbourhood all the time but we stuck to our 'menu restaurant' as we were happy with the food and delivery service.
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby SilverbackPeru » Fri Feb 10, 2012 3:53 pm

I was also just wondering this as i dont know too much about Peruvian culture but i don´t think they´re that interested in the whole Bar and Sports Bar. I tend to get the impression that social life and nights out involve either going for a meal with friends or at the weekends either a house party or a nightclub. I dont think they have the same culture for bars and drinking etc say as in Ireland, UK, Germany and northern european countrys as well as the States. I would usually spend about 6 nights a week in a pub watching sports, playing pool and darts and thats something i havent see here. If people go to something like a Tex-Mex its more likely to eat than to drink and watch sports. I´m getting this impression from when i´ve been out for say the world cup games or the champions league final in places like estadio restaurant in downtown lima or TGI´s etc. People are like mmmm nice chicken this..oh look someone scored a goal! its more being in a restaurant with sports on in the back ground than being in a bar. Also bars dont open until about 4 or 6pm and not say 10am like back in europe, and like some of the pervious people have said in this thread you´ll probably be relying on ex pats for business! tho i would probably be more than happy to provide plenty of custom to help keep it going lol
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby chi chi » Tue Feb 14, 2012 4:58 pm

SilverbackPeru wrote:I was also just wondering this as i dont know too much about Peruvian culture but i don´t think they´re that interested in the whole Bar and Sports Bar. I tend to get the impression that social life and nights out involve either going for a meal with friends or at the weekends either a house party or a nightclub. I dont think they have the same culture for bars and drinking etc say as in Ireland, UK, Germany and northern european countrys as well as the States. Also bars dont open until about 4 or 6pm and not say 10am like back in europe


You should come to La Selva. There´s a big barscene here. Bars are doing good business. Several bars in Tarapoto are open 24 hours a day. And they are always full.
And if they are not open 24/7, they are open till early morning.

In Lima, I didn´t notice a big barscene. Apart from the tourist tourist areas like Miraflores and Barranco. Some districts in Lima don´t allow bars to open. For example, Magdalena Del Mar doesn´t give licences for bars.
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby Alpineprince » Tue Feb 14, 2012 5:59 pm

A Good friend of mine is opening a new Disco in Tarapota. Claims they have no NYC style clubs open there right now. Business must be good as he is going to commute back and forth from Lima and only be open on the weekends.
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby chi chi » Tue Feb 14, 2012 6:12 pm

Alpineprince wrote:A Good friend of mine is opening a new Disco in Tarapota. Claims they have no NYC style clubs open there right now. Business must be good as he is going to commute back and forth from Lima and only be open on the weekends.


For a small city, Tarapoto has a lot of nightclubs. But they are all located in Morales.
Some are hugh like El Anaconda.

And nice, most of them are open, so not like those clubs in Europe that are inside and you dance within 4 walls.
Roofs of palmtree leaves and very stunning bartenders with mini skirts.
Some have a swimming pool inside the nightclub (La Granga)
Most of them have often life music.

And none of them charges cover on friday and sunday night. Some charge 5 soles on saturday night. Drinks are just very pricy at 6 soles for a bottle of Cristal or Pilsen Callao. But La Granga often sells beer for 4.50 soles.
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby rama0929 » Wed Feb 15, 2012 8:10 pm

chi chi wrote:In Lima, I didn´t notice a big barscene. Apart from the tourist tourist areas like Miraflores and Barranco. Some districts in Lima don´t allow bars to open. For example, Magdalena Del Mar doesn´t give licences for bars.


You'll probably want to head over to Boulevard Los Olivos
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby Meerut88 » Fri Feb 24, 2012 7:06 pm

Daniel,

I have been in Peru on numerous occasions and have thought about a sports bar theme bar & grill. From what I have seen and observed a sports bar is not likely to succeed unless you are in an area where there is a large ex pat population and you can find a loyal following. Peruvians go to the bars for three reasons 1.) Drink 2.) Eat 3) Dance, and not necessarily in that order of preference. It is unlikely that you will find many Peruvians willing to sit down and drink at a bar for the duration of a three hour football, soccer or baseball game like Americans do on a regular basis. That is my experience. However, if you do open a sports bar in Peru, please let me know because I CAN sit and drink for three hours and watch football!

Regards,

Meerut88
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby chi chi » Sat Feb 25, 2012 12:02 am

The more fat, the more popular.

Places that sell comida chatarra (junkfood) and are cheap allways do well. Anywhere in Peru.

Salchipapas, burgers, pollo broaster. Whether you sell in a swanky place are just on the street, you are guaranteed to make money. But you have to be an night owl. Most money can be made between 6 pm and 2am.

If you are an early bird, they money can be made with selling fresh juices, sandwiches...
Most money can be made between 5am and 11am.

Both business can be start up with little money and can make good money.
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby rama0929 » Sat Feb 25, 2012 6:30 pm

Meerut88 wrote:Daniel,

I have been in Peru on numerous occasions and have thought about a sports bar theme bar & grill. From what I have seen and observed a sports bar is not likely to succeed unless you are in an area where there is a large ex pat population and you can find a loyal following. Peruvians go to the bars for three reasons 1.) Drink 2.) Eat 3) Dance, and not necessarily in that order of preference. It is unlikely that you will find many Peruvians willing to sit down and drink at a bar for the duration of a three hour football, soccer or baseball game like Americans do on a regular basis. That is my experience. However, if you do open a sports bar in Peru, please let me know because I CAN sit and drink for three hours and watch football!

Regards,

Meerut88


Sports bar nightclub! :lol:
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby rama0929 » Sun Feb 26, 2012 9:06 am

Meanwhile, in Miraflores...
http://www.peruthisweek.com/food-106-Li ... ws-steaks/

Open for only a few months, Carnal is the new hot spot to eat in Lima. Styled after the classic North American steakhouse, Carnal embodies everything one would expect from this type of concept. The menu is straightforward, with not a “fusion” dish in sight. The décor is a delicious combination of plush gentlemen’s club and hip art.


Has anyone been there recently? The article was written last September.

Carnal Prime Steakhouse
Elias Aguirre 698, Miraflores
Reservations: reservas@carnalprime.com
243-3089/ 243-3088
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Re: Dream of moving to Peru from Dallas

Postby chi chi » Sun Feb 26, 2012 5:04 pm

Another succesfull concept is selling cebiche during the day and beer at night with Cumbia music at full blast.

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