Permit for tinted windows Peru

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justbrickey
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Permit for tinted windows Peru

Postby justbrickey » Sat Dec 01, 2007 5:30 pm

I bought a car a couple of weeks ago. The car came with tinted windows. As I was paying for the car the dealer told me that I needed a special permit to have my windows tinted. He said he could get me the permit the next day for almost $200. I thought I would find out some more information before I took him up on his offer.

Does anyone know the appropriate channels to use to get this permit?
How much it costs?
What is required to get the permit?

Thanks.


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Postby Mark Smith » Sun Dec 02, 2007 11:28 am

Hi - I went through this process a few years ago, so assuming it hasn't changed here's the deal. You go to the police station in your neighborhood and make an application. They do a "background check" (which I think means sitting on the application for a few days) and then have you come back with the car. They give it and you a quick look over and then you get the permit. The fee, as I recall, was well under $100, probably about half that. But a lot of time waiting in lines as nothing at the police stations moves fast.

The interesting thing is this, in the several years since and having been stopped by the PNP many times, I was not once asked for this permit. The one time I did get asked, before I got the permit, I slipped the guy about s/.10 and that was the end of it (after the obligatory lecture on how serious a violation this is and all that).

In hind sight I'd probably not do it again. But if you have a bit of free time and want to see the inside of a police station, it's a pretty painless process.

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Postby WikiSama » Sun Dec 02, 2007 11:33 am

Tinted Windows: "Lunas Polarizadas"

Authorization of Use of Tinted Windows in Vehicles

Needed:
- Copy of your DNI or CE
- Copy of your Driver's License (Licencia de Conducir)
- Copy of your Propriertor's Card (Tarjeta de Propiedad)
- Copy of your SOAT
- Four color photos (10 x 15 cm), one for each side of the car: one from the front, one from the back, and two from the sides.
- Receipt from Banco de la Nación for inscription rights (2.94% of the current UIT - approx S/. 101.43)
- Driver's Record from the MTC (Récord del Conductor)
- Police Records Certificate (Antecedentes Policiales)
- Domiciliary Certificate (Certificado Domiciliario)
- Letter addressed to the Director de la Policía de Tránsito PNP, in which you stating your request to have tinted windows and why do you need them.

(Vehicles will be submitted to inspection if the tint allows luminic transparence, nomimal law states 70% transparency vs 30% tint, vehicles that allow no transparence will be disqualified)

If request is approved, authorization will be granted in 1 day. Examination and presenting application may take up to 2 days. Getting other documents such as records, may take up to 2 days also.

Where to request?
Dirección de Policía de Tránsito PNP
Oficina de Apoyo Técnico
Av. 28 de Julio Cdra. 20 - La Victoria

Who evaluates?
Chief of the Oficina de Apoyo Técnico of DIPOLTRAN-PNP

If you're fluent in Spanish, I recommend you call first before getting all these documents and ask if you really need them and what to do (all the previous info is collected from various sites, none say this is it).
Parmentier

Postby Parmentier » Sun Dec 02, 2007 11:38 am

Why would you want to use tinted windows?
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Postby Mark Smith » Sun Dec 02, 2007 11:48 am

Unfortunately the police consider even the very slight tint that security film provides as "tinted" under the law. That security film is excellent - it makes it almost impossible to do those "smash and grabs" that happen at traffic jams, where someone runs up to your car with a rock or battery cables, takes out your window and then grabs a purse, briefcase, or whatever. I highly recommend that film, though the PNP ought to back off on their application of "tinted" rules.

As to the La Victoria station, it used to be that any station could do the tinted windows permits. Perhaps that changed?
Remy

Postby Remy » Sun Dec 02, 2007 2:23 pm

Parmentier wrote:Why would you want to use tinted windows?


Nobody can see what's in your car, basically. However, where there's smoke, there's fire, so you'd almost surely attract the attention of thieves and/or robbers.

A very negative thing about these cars with tinted windows is that the vast majority of their drivers are true assassins. They freely drive while talking on their cell phone and display other reckless behaviour. They've got this idea that if they can't be seen, they can do whatever they please. I personally am in favour of a tinted-window ban. Especially when an accident has been caused, the true ID of the driver is difficult to find out in case the driver quickly drives away. Sure, you can remember the license plate, but the owner can always claim he wasn't driving.
Parmentier

Postby Parmentier » Sun Dec 02, 2007 4:00 pm

Remy wrote: However, where there's smoke, there's fire, so you'd almost surely attract the attention of thieves and/or robbers.

A very negative thing about these cars with tinted windows is that the vast majority of their drivers are true assassins.


Yep, I agree.
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Postby WikiSama » Sun Dec 02, 2007 5:50 pm

Just a note: On many occassions, I've seen cars that come from "segunda mano" from Japan, Korea, and other countries, that already have tinted windows (not film), also many cars come with obscured windows as they're manufactured - ergo, you need the authorization to have them.

Sometimes it's not a choice, but something you have to do, unless you have the money to change the windows (lots of pretty moneys).
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Postby rodd » Mon Dec 03, 2007 9:12 am

we bought a toyota corolla from tacna and it was a japanese import and it came with tinted windows it was not stick on film it was black glass and it would have cost hundreds of dollars to replace all of the windows, we never got a permit and the police only bothered us if the windows were down so they could see who was driving and then we had to slip them 10 soles and they let us drive off, with the windows up we never got stopped , i would think the poolice need to worry more about the state of their own vehicles than about tinted windows, last time i was in miraflores i saw several police cars and even motorcycles with bald tyres and even saw the cord sticking out of the tyre on a police motorbike
Remy

Postby Remy » Mon Dec 03, 2007 9:49 am

rodd wrote:i would think the poolice need to worry more about the state of their own vehicles than about tinted windows, last time i was in miraflores i saw several police cars and even motorcycles with bald tyres and even saw the cord sticking out of the tyre on a police motorbike


I think they are worried enough, but worries do not increase their budget.
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Postby Ron » Mon Dec 03, 2007 5:05 pm

I agree with Rodd. We had a Toyota with tinted windows and never had a problem, not even going to and from the airport with it's security. Just remember, S/.10 and a sincere apology will usually do the trick.
Parmentier

Postby Parmentier » Mon Dec 03, 2007 5:20 pm

Ron wrote: Just remember, S/.10 and a sincere apology will usually do the trick.


Sorry but that kind of behaviour contributes in making Peruvian society corrupted. Let's try to change things in a good way.
Remy

Postby Remy » Mon Dec 03, 2007 5:25 pm

Parmentier wrote:
Ron wrote: Just remember, S/.10 and a sincere apology will usually do the trick.


Sorry but that kind of behaviour contributes in making Peruvian society corrupted. Let's try to change things in a good way.


Yep. Agreed. Though I have to admit that sometimes bribes are unavoidable. For example, when I wanted to renew my tourist visa by going out of the country at Aguas Verdes. DIGEMIN in Lima told me that I could quickly get over the border and return, but at Aguas Verdes I was told it was impossible and that only by paying them they would cooperate.

But yes, once you've deliberately start bribing the police, you aren't a good guest.
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Postby Ron » Tue Dec 04, 2007 7:52 pm

Very well. Just curious, has anyone actually paid a traffic ticket? I would not know how to go about it.
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Postby WikiSama » Wed Dec 05, 2007 12:46 am

Ron wrote:Very well. Just curious, has anyone actually paid a traffic ticket? I would not know how to go about it.


My advice: Pay it in the bank no after than 7 days after imposed, and you'll only pay 50% of the ticket. *Don't ask me why is this, maybe encouraging people to pay, so that their cash flux will be okay*.

NEVER ever hint at bribing. If the police does hint you so you'll bribe them, then go ahead and file a report against him, the less crooked cops out there, the better. Have this number in your cell at all times: 422-8421, it's the number of the Police IA (Internal Affairs) Agency. Denounce the act and the name (should be on his tag).

The last time I did this, they told me to wait alongside the crooked cop *who wanted to flee and begged me not to tell on him*. A cop arrived in a motorcycle 10 mins after, he talked to me, he gave me my fine, and stayed there with the crook. A posterior follow-up from a friend in the police revealed the crook had been demoted and was now working as the coffee-maker for the comissary. :twisted:
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Postby Jonathan » Wed Dec 05, 2007 2:15 am

I received 2 tickets in one week when I first started driving in Lima. I thought there were no rules, because no one obeyed any of them. So I started to drive like everyone else (like an a hole), well maybe a little worse. ha. After I received my 2nd ticket I realized that there are some rules, so I tried to follow them as much as everyone else does.
I know you have to pay your ticket within 7 days or it will double. I went the next day to pay mine. Not sure where it was. I was with my wife.
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Re: Permit for tinted windows Peru

Postby Tracyrteach » Wed Sep 25, 2013 11:28 am

Does anyone have any updated information on this process? At the dealership, they put me in contact with someone who helps sort out the paperwork at the price of $500. Is that really how much it costs nowadays? I don't mind a slight mark-up,if it'll spare me the headache of Peruvian paperwork bureaucracy, but I also don't want to be priced gauged.
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Re: Permit for tinted windows Peru

Postby MarcoPE » Wed Sep 25, 2013 11:39 am

Tracyrteach wrote:Does anyone have any updated information on this process? At the dealership, they put me in contact with someone who helps sort out the paperwork at the price of $500. Is that really how much it costs nowadays? I don't mind a slight mark-up,if it'll spare me the headache of Peruvian paperwork bureaucracy, but I also don't want to be priced gauged.


Is that $500US or soles?

Anyway, this link may help: http://www.mininter.gob.pe/tramitesdetalle.php?item=3
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Re: Permit for tinted windows Peru

Postby Tracyrteach » Wed Sep 25, 2013 11:53 am

It was quoted as $500, I'll email back and ask for clarification, USD vs Soles.
Thank you for the link. I also came up with this link
http://www.todoautos.com.pe/f122/nuevos ... 25515.html

Which seems quite laborious.
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Re: Permit for tinted windows Peru

Postby argidd » Wed Sep 25, 2013 11:55 am

Are you sure you want tinted windows?
There are shades which don't need a permit, that protect you from the sun. Having tints even with a permit will cause pólice officers to stop you every so often.
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Re: Permit for tinted windows Peru

Postby Tracyrteach » Wed Sep 25, 2013 12:39 pm

That is a good thought, Argidd and for my next car, I may do without the tinted windows. I prefer the aesthetics of the tinted windows and the sense of security if my wife is driving by herself, so that thieves can't tell.

MarcoPE, yes it is $500 USD!?!?!
Last edited by Tracyrteach on Wed Nov 06, 2013 11:00 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Permit for tinted windows Peru

Postby PeruFan » Thu Sep 26, 2013 9:11 pm

I am going to share some "second hand" information here. I have heard this from several friends that have tinted windows and have gone through the process. I believe it is accurate.

I believe you get the permit and it is good for two years. You have to renew every two years. The permit is for the drivers of that particular car. So, if you get the permit, it does not allow other drivers that might borrow your car. It is for the specific driver in the specific car. More than one family member can be on the permit. If you have that permit you cannot drive another car with tinted windows without a seperate permit. Make sense?

I believe it is inexpensive, but as already stated it is long lines at the comisaria.
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Re: Permit for tinted windows Peru

Postby kpw » Fri Sep 27, 2013 5:51 am

Tinted windows are a must in Lima, you will otherwise go blind from the Serenazgo blue lights :)
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Re: Permit for tinted windows Peru

Postby panman » Fri Sep 27, 2013 8:30 am

kpw wrote:Tinted windows are a must in Lima, you will otherwise go blind from the Serenazgo blue lights :)

The Serenazgo blue lights are no joke, they're a danger especially if you're one of the few people in Lima who drive and look ahead at the same time.
I was on my way home last night, in the dark, and had to pull down my sun visor to try and stop the light from blinding me as I was swerving to miss idiots, dressed in dark clothing, crossing the road in front of me.
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Re: Permit for tinted windows Peru

Postby alan » Fri Sep 27, 2013 8:33 am

kpw wrote:Tinted windows are a must in Lima, you will otherwise go blind from the Serenazgo blue lights :)



I know! Terrible irony, isn´t it? Absolutely blinding at times.
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Re: Permit for tinted windows Peru

Postby 28 de julio » Fri Sep 27, 2013 12:18 pm

Yup, I wonder how many epileptic fits or strokes those lights have caused.
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Re: Permit for tinted windows Peru

Postby argidd » Fri Sep 27, 2013 12:26 pm

28 de julio wrote:Yup, I wonder how many epileptic fits or strokes those lights have caused.


I always wonder the same thing!
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Re: Permit for tinted windows Peru

Postby panman » Fri Sep 27, 2013 10:53 pm

28 de julio wrote:Yup, I wonder how many epileptic fits or strokes those lights have caused.

For this reason alone they'd be outlawed in the UK, and probably America, for fear of the local councils having legal action taken against them.
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Re: Permit for tinted windows Peru

Postby PeruFan » Sat Sep 28, 2013 7:50 am

Wow, I am glad to see someone else post about the Serenazgo lights. They drive me absolutely insane! They can actually provoke migraines for me. I have a daughter with epilepsy and so we also have her covering her face and closing her eyes when they are near. She detests them. I have often thought of contacting the municipality (La Molina) and complaining because they are so bright you can't possibly drive safetly when they are near. Is there anything we can do about this?

I have always thought they were using them incorrectly. The blue lights, if used, should only be in an emergency so that they stand out. As it is now, everyone ignores them because they go driving around al the time with them on. Plus, if you're a thief you just wait till they go by to rob. Its obvious where they are, you can see them a mile away. Sort of seems like an early warning system for crooks.
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Re: Permit for tinted windows Peru

Postby alan » Sat Sep 28, 2013 1:54 pm

PeruFan wrote:Wow, I am glad to see someone else post about the Serenazgo lights. They drive me absolutely insane! They can actually provoke migraines for me. I have a daughter with epilepsy and so we also have her covering her face and closing her eyes when they are near. She detests them. I have often thought of contacting the municipality (La Molina) and complaining because they are so bright you can't possibly drive safetly when they are near. Is there anything we can do about this?

I have always thought they were using them incorrectly. The blue lights, if used, should only be in an emergency so that they stand out. As it is now, everyone ignores them because they go driving around al the time with them on. Plus, if you're a thief you just wait till they go by to rob. Its obvious where they are, you can see them a mile away. Sort of seems like an early warning system for crooks.


Sounds like a good topic for a news story, with streeter interviews. I can´t imagine many people (drivers anyway) agreeing with the use.

That said, there must be a good reason they are doing it. Maybe it serves to give residents a feeling of security, and it "keeps honest boys good" by reminding them that the law is always near. They do not keep them on all the time, after all.
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Re: Permit for tinted windows Peru

Postby tupacperu » Mon Sep 30, 2013 8:25 am

Read an Article that the Police set up a checkpoint on Avenida Marina in San MIguel, especially cars with tinted window. They were also checking licenses and auto registrations. They confiscated about 100 unregister vehicles and gave out quite a few tickets for tinted windows.

http://elcomercio.pe/actualidad/1636818 ... san-miguel

San Miguel: almost 2,000 vehicles were audited by the Transit Police

This is due to an operation that was intended to verify that the drivers have their documentation in order

The audit was conducted on thousands of vehicles.
It was attended by dozens of police.
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Re: Permit for tinted windows Peru

Postby Tracyrteach » Wed Nov 06, 2013 11:18 am

I did get the permiso finally and used a broker to expedite the process. It cost me 900 soles and required only a little of my time. I was suspicious, so the broker, Martin told me I could do part of the work myself; comisaria para Los antecedentes policiales(30 soles)and Banco de la Nacion to pay about 470 soles for the permission to have the windows tinted. Once I had the receipts and the copies of CE, DNI and driver's license I met with Martin. I'm usually pretty suspicious, but he is a nice guy. He took the pictures of the vehicle, the copies of the documents and explained what would happen. He would submit the documentation for review and the permiso should be ready in three to five business days. He can deliver, though I was suspicious and wanted to go myself to be sure it was authentic. I went to the comisaria and met Martin. He told me which window to go to, where I gave my information and picked up the card. I paid Martin the remaining roughly 400 soles after I had the card in my hand. I found him here:
http://nuestromercado.clasificados.pe/k ... -100-legal

FYI, it says 750 soles at the top, but that is only for renewing a permit, which needs to be done every two years.
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Re: Permit for tinted windows Peru IS A BIG DEAL NOW

Postby crazytacoperu.com » Mon Mar 23, 2015 4:58 pm

They are really cracking down on the windows tinting permissions. Its a GREAT way for them to generate revenue for bribes.

1. EACH driver has to have permission.
2. If the car does not have permission for Tinted Windows for at least 1 driver then they can impound the vehicle.
3. Its a fine of 2000 soles plus they keep your car until you have the tinted windows permission.
4. It takes a month to get the permission.
5 Cost of permission is around 500 soles, more to have someone who knows how to get it for you (900 soles).

I bought a car with tinted windows and I had to bribe the cop AFTER they made me drive into the impound lot and gave me hard time. They wanted 200 soles, I only had 120 with me. So after an hour of bad harassing me they finally let me go. They made it very clear that any vehicle without permission will be impounded (so they can make more money). They have the upper hand since they can legally impound your vehicle and are always looking for these vehicles because the drivers usually have money and dont' want their car impounded. Its the best revenue generator they have. Why charge a "MULTA" when u can get 200 soles personally?

BOTTOM LINE: IF you buy a car with tinted windows, have the tint removed until you get the license or you will be forever harassed. Cost me 50 soles to have them removed.
..A Peruvian once asked me:what's the difference between special and abnormal?.....well my answer was : Lady Gaga and Miley Cyrus..
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Re: Permit for tinted windows Peru

Postby gringolandia » Tue Mar 24, 2015 11:56 am

Not sure how useful this information is, but I've heard that the only police that can actually give you a ticket for not having the tinted window permit are the Policia Transito. So if any other police are trying to shake you down I suppose you could "call their bluff" and tell them to go ahead and call the Policia Transito if they want to give you a ticket. Of course there is always the risk they will go ahead and do exactly that (and potentially impound your car) :shock:

This whole tinted window thing is very annoying in cases where windows are only slightly tinted, particularly on cars that come from the factory with some tint on the rear windows. The dark tint where you really can't see inside the vehicle at all is one thing, but IMHO it is an unjustified hassle in other cases.

Aside from the hassle of getting the permit in the first place, there is the fact that the permit is only valid for the specific names listed on it. I think it comes with two names standard, but you can pay extra for a couple more? Anyway, that basically means you can't (legally) lend your car to anyone else.

Or maybe that is a "feature" for people who hate lending their cars to others... it gives them an excuse to say "no."

I bought a car that had tint installed by the previous owner and I hated it. It was so dark and gloomy inside the car. It was oppressively depressing to drive, and it was also more difficult to see other cars in the rear view mirrors. So I had the tint removed.

However I left the protective layer that protects the glass from being broken and even just that gives a slight tint to the window that I've been told still requires a permit. Arg... so annoying!

Someone told me the fine for not having the permit is pretty big. The far worse part, however, is that they can take and impound the car. Having my car sucked into the Peruvian bureaucracy sounds like a nightmare scenario. I don't even want to think about the hoops one would have to jump through to get it back.

So if I didn't have the permit and were stopped I would definitely pay whatever bribe necessary to get out of it. I read some people complaining about paying bribes and how it makes Peru worse and I don't agree. Bribes are just a symptom of the real problems such as the lack of respect for police who only loosely apply the law because they are underpaid and have little incentive to do otherwise, and the inane bureaucratic nonsense that complicates so many aspects of Peruvian life and encourages people to take shortcuts. If you have some moral problem with bribes then don't pay them. However, if I can make my life a little more bearable in this extremely flawed system I will pay. I recommend aiming any righteous indignation at fixing the real problems.

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