Moving to Lima

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lij317
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Moving to Lima

Postby lij317 » Tue Jun 03, 2014 3:11 pm

Hey everyone - my husband and I are selling off everything and moving to Lima in July. We are moving for his job and have a place to stay for the first few days. While he's working, I'm going to be on my own, learning the lay of the land, finding a place to live, learning the language, basically flying by the seat of my pants.

Do any of you have any rock star suggestions on how to not lose my mind while I'm out getting lost by myself? Any thoughts on how to get to know the neighborhoods, locals, find a job, make some friends, find an affordable place to live?

My husband will be working in Jesus Maria - so we are looking to live in Miraflores, Jesus Maria, Magdalena del Mar, or San Isidro.

Thanks!
jill


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Re: Moving to Lima

Postby tomasb » Wed Jun 04, 2014 12:14 pm

For starters, do not get too lost as neighborhoods can change quickly. Get a map of Lima...

Try to have restaurants call for your taxis etc rather than taking one on a random basis. Use older drivers when possible. Make sure the fare is determined before you start your trip. If you don't know any Spanish make knowing the numbers a priority. A Spanish course specializing in Spanish for travelers is a good start. The metro system is fairly efficient but does not go everywhere in the city. However, it can be crowded in the morning and late afternoon/early evening.

There are some tasty and inexpensive restaurants near Parque Kennedy in Miraflores. Great to go for lunch.

I hear Jesus Maria is a decent middle class area and less expensive than Miraflores and San Isidro, where landlords are known to charge exorbitant prices. Wherever you decide to live, examine your husbands commute time during busy drive times.
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Re: Moving to Lima

Postby chi chi » Wed Jun 04, 2014 1:35 pm

lij317 wrote:My husband will be working in Jesus Maria - so we are looking to live in Miraflores, Jesus Maria, Magdalena del Mar, or San Isidro.


Unfortunately, the districts you mentioned are the most expensive ones in the city.
San Miguel is close to Jesús Maria and still a bit affordable although prices gone up there in the last few years as well.

Furnished places are scarce and are very expensive. It's much cheaper to rent an unfurnished place and buy your furniture. In La Zona Industrial in Villa El Salvador, you can buy nice furniture at factory prices. Don't buy the grossly overpriced furniture at the big chainstores like Saga and Ripley.

For places to rent look at http://www.adondevivir.com and http://www.urbania.pe

When you see a place that you want to rent then always try to negotiate a lower rental rate. Try to get things like wáter, arbitrious, ,monthly maintenance costs if it's an appartment, electricity,... included in the rent.
As a gringa you have an advantage when it comes to renting a place. Firstly, landlords will think that you got a lot of money so they will try to charge you more rent but at the end they prefer to rent it out to a gringo as they think that they are more reliable when it comes to paying rent. So, that's when you have to use your bargaining power. If the landlord doesn't want lower the rent, then just walk off. Most likely he will run behind you to offer you a lower rent. (often great deals can be done if you offer to pay the rent 6 months or a year in advance. I did that once and got 40% of the rental price.

When you found a place to rent, change the doorlock. Otherwise, previous tenants, the landlord or even the concierge who got hold of a copy of the key somehow might bring an unwanted visit to your flat.



Find out about the busroutes. Public transport is very cheap and buses run very frequently. If you miss the bus, then the next bus arrives within 1 minute.

Shop for food at the markets. Supermarkets are expensive in Peru. Magdalena del Mar has one of the best markets in town. Don't forget to haggle for the price at the markets.
Buy ítems like shampoo, soap, toilet paper, rice, toothpaste, canned and bottled drinks, etc. in bulk at the distribudores. You will save a lot of money. MAKRO is a good place to buy things in bulk.

Buy white goods, TV's, etc. around the festive days like Christmas, Independence Day, Fathers day, etc. Good deals can be done.

Buy clothes at the end of the season. 2X1 and 3X1 offers are common. I have even seen 4X1 offers.

Although Peru is called a third world country, many things are more expensive than in Europe.
Wine, cheese, cars, laptops, designer clothing are more expensive than in Europe.


Learning Spanish will be a must if you want to get a job, meet people and simply just get around in this huge city. If you don't speak Spanish then people like taxi drivers might take advantage of you by charge you the infamous ''gringo prices''.

On the internet you will find a lot of saucy stories about crime in Lima. There's indeed a lot of crime and extreme poverty in Lima and Peru in general. But if you use common sense then you will be fine.
Don't show excessive signs of wealth. Don't wear flashy bling-bling or let an expensive camera dangling around your neck. A Louis Viutton handbag looks nice but will also attract undisirables.
Don't look lost. ''Helpfull'' people might rob you. Before you go somewhere, look at a map and plan your route.
When taking a taxi, lock the doors and put your handbag on the floor between your legs. Taxis often get robbed at traffic lights or when stuck in traffic jams. Also sit behind the driver so it's harder for him to attack you. Make sure that there's a doorhandle at the door, so you can escape in case you get into trouble with the driver.
Walk off when 2 people ask you for the time. Whilst you talk to the one, the other will grab your watch or handbag or necklace. After all, leave necklaces and watches at home.

Most Peruvians are very helpfull and friendly towards foreigners but be very carefull when making friends. There are loads of people that are just after your money or have the intention to take advantage of you.
NEVER BORROW MONEY TO FRIENDS. No matter how sad their story is. Grandmother is sick and urgently needs an operation, their brother lost their job and might lose his home, the dog has worms and needs a vaccination, etc. Don't believe any of those stories.

In Peru, BORROWING means DONATING.

Good luck with your move. 8)
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Re: Moving to Lima

Postby tomasb » Wed Jun 04, 2014 3:23 pm

Good advice from Chi Chi. Especially true about lending money. However, once I sold an item to a friend from Lima who paid for the item several weeks later as promised. All my Peruvian acquaintances said she would never pay me but she did. However, my friend lived in Australia for several years and said that she adopted many of their customs including not welching.

I almost forgot but be careful about the mustard trick while walking on the street. And like ChiChi says, always walk with a confident air.
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Re: Moving to Lima

Postby panman » Thu Jun 05, 2014 12:40 pm

chi chi wrote:
lij317 wrote:My husband will be working in Jesus Maria - so we are looking to live in Miraflores, Jesus Maria, Magdalena del Mar, or San Isidro.


Unfortunately, the districts you mentioned are the most expensive ones in the city.
San Miguel is close to Jesús Maria and still a bit affordable although prices gone up there in the last few years as well.

Furnished places are scarce and are very expensive. It's much cheaper to rent an unfurnished place and buy your furniture. In La Zona Industrial in Villa El Salvador, you can buy nice furniture at factory prices. Don't buy the grossly overpriced furniture at the big chainstores like Saga and Ripley.

For places to rent look at http://www.adondevivir.com and http://www.urbania.pe

When you see a place that you want to rent then always try to negotiate a lower rental rate. Try to get things like wáter, arbitrious, ,monthly maintenance costs if it's an appartment, electricity,... included in the rent.
As a gringa you have an advantage when it comes to renting a place. Firstly, landlords will think that you got a lot of money so they will try to charge you more rent but at the end they prefer to rent it out to a gringo as they think that they are more reliable when it comes to paying rent. So, that's when you have to use your bargaining power. If the landlord doesn't want lower the rent, then just walk off. Most likely he will run behind you to offer you a lower rent. (often great deals can be done if you offer to pay the rent 6 months or a year in advance. I did that once and got 40% of the rental price.

When you found a place to rent, change the doorlock. Otherwise, previous tenants, the landlord or even the concierge who got hold of a copy of the key somehow might bring an unwanted visit to your flat.



Find out about the busroutes. Public transport is very cheap and buses run very frequently. If you miss the bus, then the next bus arrives within 1 minute.

Shop for food at the markets. Supermarkets are expensive in Peru. Magdalena del Mar has one of the best markets in town. Don't forget to haggle for the price at the markets.
Buy ítems like shampoo, soap, toilet paper, rice, toothpaste, canned and bottled drinks, etc. in bulk at the distribudores. You will save a lot of money. MAKRO is a good place to buy things in bulk.

Buy white goods, TV's, etc. around the festive days like Christmas, Independence Day, Fathers day, etc. Good deals can be done.

Buy clothes at the end of the season. 2X1 and 3X1 offers are common. I have even seen 4X1 offers.

Although Peru is called a third world country, many things are more expensive than in Europe.
Wine, cheese, cars, laptops, designer clothing are more expensive than in Europe.


Learning Spanish will be a must if you want to get a job, meet people and simply just get around in this huge city. If you don't speak Spanish then people like taxi drivers might take advantage of you by charge you the infamous ''gringo prices''.

On the internet you will find a lot of saucy stories about crime in Lima. There's indeed a lot of crime and extreme poverty in Lima and Peru in general. But if you use common sense then you will be fine.
Don't show excessive signs of wealth. Don't wear flashy bling-bling or let an expensive camera dangling around your neck. A Louis Viutton handbag looks nice but will also attract undisirables.
Don't look lost. ''Helpfull'' people might rob you. Before you go somewhere, look at a map and plan your route.
When taking a taxi, lock the doors and put your handbag on the floor between your legs. Taxis often get robbed at traffic lights or when stuck in traffic jams. Also sit behind the driver so it's harder for him to attack you. Make sure that there's a doorhandle at the door, so you can escape in case you get into trouble with the driver.
Walk off when 2 people ask you for the time. Whilst you talk to the one, the other will grab your watch or handbag or necklace. After all, leave necklaces and watches at home.

Most Peruvians are very helpfull and friendly towards foreigners but be very carefull when making friends. There are loads of people that are just after your money or have the intention to take advantage of you.
NEVER BORROW MONEY TO FRIENDS. No matter how sad their story is. Grandmother is sick and urgently needs an operation, their brother lost their job and might lose his home, the dog has worms and needs a vaccination, etc. Don't believe any of those stories.

In Peru, BORROWING means DONATING.

Good luck with your move. 8)

I would agree with most of the above and also suggest Pueblo Libre as a possible place to live, slightly nearer to Jesus Maria and close enough to San Miguel to benefit from the shops cinemas and restaurants etc.
As for finding a landlord who is going to include things like wáter, arbitrious, ,monthly maintenance costs if it's an appartment, electricity in the rent all at a "democratic price" please tell me where to find such a fool.
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Re: Moving to Lima

Postby chi chi » Fri Jun 06, 2014 2:10 am

panman wrote:As for finding a landlord who is going to include things like wáter, arbitrious, ,monthly maintenance costs if it's an appartment, electricity in the rent all at a "democratic price" please tell me where to find such a fool.


It will be very unlikely that a landlord will include all those services but you can negotiate to include a few of them. When I just moved to Peru, I did a deal on a flat and succesfully negotiated to get the monthly maintenance costs and arbitrios included in the rent. He also wanted 2 months deposit but I only paid 1 months deposit.

If the landlords feels that you are easily spending money and if you aren't tough with bargaining the landlord might easily take advantage of you at the end of the rental agreement by ''inventing damage'', extra costs and he will invent something so he won't have to pay back your deposit.
Renting a place in Peru isn't for the faint hearted. It's a tough market and their are loads of scams.
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Re: Moving to Lima

Postby e-peruvian » Thu Jun 12, 2014 11:29 pm

In order to find a place to live , you might want to take a 3 step approach.
First you will need to check into a hotel in Miraflores and plan on staying there about one week. You can find decent hotels for as little as $60 per night or stay at the Marriott or Hilton for $200-$300 per night.
During this week you should look for an apartment to rent for 1 or 2 months.There will be no need to sign a long term lease at these short-term furnished rental apartments The rate will be high , from $300 to $500 per week but it will give you a comfortable base of operation to start looking for an apartment rather than trying to rent an apartment right away without being sure if it is the right location for you.
While in this apartment you can take your time to find out where you will really be comfortable living and you will have time to compare apartments and prices. You can expect to pay $1000 per month for a nice apartment of 70+ meters squared. For $2000 per month you will be able to rent an extremely nice apartment of at least 100 meters squared. It all depends on you budget. These apartments will probably require a one year lease.
Good luck to you.
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Re: Moving to Lima

Postby chi chi » Fri Jun 13, 2014 11:45 am

e-peruvian wrote:In order to find a place to live , you might want to take a 3 step approach.
First you will need to check into a hotel in Miraflores and plan on staying there about one week. You can find decent hotels for as little as $60 per night or stay at the Marriott or Hilton for $200-$300 per night.


Way to expensive. The OP's husband is going to work in Jesús Maria and they wants in or close to that área.
You can find very decent and nice hostels for around $18 a night.

e-peruvian wrote:You can expect to pay $1000 per month for a nice apartment of 70+ meters squared. For $2000 per month you will be able to rent an extremely nice apartment of at least 100 meters squared. It all depends on you budget. These apartments will probably require a one year lease.
Good luck to you.


You can easily rent a brandnew appartment in a nice área for around $525 a month.

This are only a few: (and you can easily negotiate a lower price)

http://www.adondevivir.com/propiedades/ ... 5snvxEg9Ms

http://www.adondevivir.com/propiedades/ ... 5sn-BEg9Ms

http://www.adondevivir.com/propiedades/ ... 5soshEg9Ms

http://www.adondevivir.com/propiedades/ ... 5so5REg9Ms

http://www.adondevivir.com/propiedades/ ... 5spFREg9Ms

http://www.adondevivir.com/propiedades/ ... 5spSxEg9Ms

http://www.adondevivir.com/propiedades/ ... 5spdhEg9Ms

http://www.adondevivir.com/propiedades/ ... 5sqLREg9Ms

http://www.adondevivir.com/propiedades/ ... 5sqUhEg9Ms
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Re: Moving to Lima

Postby ironchefchris » Fri Jun 13, 2014 12:57 pm

tomasb wrote:I almost forgot but be careful about the mustard trick while walking on the street.


???
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Re: Moving to Lima

Postby Sergio Bernales » Fri Jun 13, 2014 4:43 pm

ironchefchris wrote:
tomasb wrote:I almost forgot but be careful about the mustard trick while walking on the street.


???


That's when someone walking buy spills something on you, like mustard or ketchup, and then insists on cleaning you up. Meanwhile a few accomplices, who are supposedly innocent bystanders will offer to help and while they clean you up, they'll pickpocket you.

https://www.lonelyplanet.com/thorntree/ ... tard-trick
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Re: Moving to Lima

Postby chi chi » Sat Jun 14, 2014 12:31 am

Sergio Bernales wrote:
ironchefchris wrote:
tomasb wrote:I almost forgot but be careful about the mustard trick while walking on the street.


???


That's when someone walking buy spills something on you, like mustard or ketchup, and then insists on cleaning you up. Meanwhile a few accomplices, who are supposedly innocent bystanders will offer to help and while they clean you up, they'll pickpocket you.

https://www.lonelyplanet.com/thorntree/ ... tard-trick


I've read that too in the Lonely Planet but I never heard about anyone who became a victim of that trick.
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Re: Moving to Lima

Postby KenBE » Sat Jun 14, 2014 7:52 am

chi chi wrote:
Sergio Bernales wrote:
ironchefchris wrote:
tomasb wrote:I almost forgot but be careful about the mustard trick while walking on the street.


???


That's when someone walking buy spills something on you, like mustard or ketchup, and then insists on cleaning you up. Meanwhile a few accomplices, who are supposedly innocent bystanders will offer to help and while they clean you up, they'll pickpocket you.

https://www.lonelyplanet.com/thorntree/ ... tard-trick


I've read that too in the Lonely Planet but I never heard about anyone who became a victim of that trick.


Neither have I. I would say it isn't very common. Most robberies and muggings in Peru are either at gun/knife point or just things like purse snatching or a guy grabbing your cell phone and running away.
Last edited by KenBE on Sat Jun 14, 2014 10:14 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Moving to Lima

Postby tomasb » Sat Jun 14, 2014 9:55 am

The last time that I heard about the mustard trick occurred in Cuenca, Ecuador at the bus station. This was a few years ago and I spoke to the young college aged victim a few days later. An accomplice grabbed her luggage while she was distracted by the perpetrator.

I heard anecdotally that it happened to someone in Cusco a few years back so though not a common ruse, it seems like it still occurs.
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Re: Moving to Lima

Postby ironchefchris » Sat Jun 14, 2014 11:01 am

I thought that's what it might be. Distract you while someone else robs you. I had my pocket picked in Puntarenas, Costa Rica when I got off the ferry and was transferring to a bus. Some old guy sold me a Coca-Cola and started up a conversation as I was surrounded by little kids. Went to pay for my bust ticket and noticed my wallet was gone after I last used it to pay for the coke. Most of my $ was in a travel pouch attached to my leg so it was no big loss.
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Re: Moving to Lima

Postby Maz » Sat Jun 14, 2014 5:44 pm

Here are a couple of handy websites for working out bus routes:
http://www.buscaturuta.com.mx/pe/lima
http://irpania.perut.org/tiki-index.php
They aren't comprehensive and not always 100% accurate but I find them very helpful anyway.
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Re: Moving to Lima

Postby chi chi » Sat Jun 14, 2014 9:14 pm

ironchefchris wrote:I thought that's what it might be. Distract you while someone else robs you. I had my pocket picked in Puntarenas, Costa Rica when I got off the ferry and was transferring to a bus. Some old guy sold me a Coca-Cola and started up a conversation as I was surrounded by little kids. Went to pay for my bust ticket and noticed my wallet was gone after I last used it to pay for the coke. Most of my $ was in a travel pouch attached to my leg so it was no big loss.


I always carry with me a little spray filled with acid.
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Re: Moving to Lima

Postby ironchefchris » Sat Jun 14, 2014 9:36 pm

chi chi wrote:
ironchefchris wrote:I thought that's what it might be. Distract you while someone else robs you. I had my pocket picked in Puntarenas, Costa Rica when I got off the ferry and was transferring to a bus. Some old guy sold me a Coca-Cola and started up a conversation as I was surrounded by little kids. Went to pay for my bust ticket and noticed my wallet was gone after I last used it to pay for the coke. Most of my $ was in a travel pouch attached to my leg so it was no big loss.


I always carry with me a little spray filled with acid.


Are you talking about pepper spray or are you being literal? If literal, what kind of acid are you using? My initial thought was Lysergic D-25. Might not cause them much discomfort at first, but in a half hour or so they'll have a bad time over the next 12-24 hours wishing they never messed with you. Especially if it's brown. :shock: :wink: :twisted: :mrgreen:
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Re: Moving to Lima

Postby chi chi » Sat Jun 14, 2014 9:51 pm

ironchefchris wrote:
chi chi wrote:
ironchefchris wrote:I thought that's what it might be. Distract you while someone else robs you. I had my pocket picked in Puntarenas, Costa Rica when I got off the ferry and was transferring to a bus. Some old guy sold me a Coca-Cola and started up a conversation as I was surrounded by little kids. Went to pay for my bust ticket and noticed my wallet was gone after I last used it to pay for the coke. Most of my $ was in a travel pouch attached to my leg so it was no big loss.


I always carry with me a little spray filled with acid.


Are you talking about pepper spray or are you being literal? If literal, what kind of acid are you using? My initial thought was Lysergic D-25. Might not cause them much discomfort at first, but in a half hour or so they'll have a bad time over the next 12-24 hours wishing they never messed with you. Especially if it's brown. :shock: :wink: :twisted: :mrgreen:



Battery acid. A criminal goes blind permanently and his face completely maimed for life. They should have thinked at least twice before commiting the crime.
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Re: Moving to Lima

Postby ironchefchris » Sat Jun 14, 2014 10:59 pm

chi chi wrote:Battery acid. A criminal goes blind permanently and his face completely maimed for life. They should have thinked at least twice before commiting the crime.


Have you had to use this? If so, where? How many times? Do you really "always carry" it with you? Do you keep this spray bottle in your pocket? Are you worried about the bottle breaking or leaking, however you carry it? What if you tripped or otherwise fell, breaking the bottle in the process? What kind of bottle is best to carry this specific, and dangerous, acid? It would seem to be an efficient way to prevent this person from committing future crimes.
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Re: Moving to Lima

Postby panman » Sun Jun 15, 2014 11:54 am

ironchefchris wrote:
chi chi wrote:Battery acid. A criminal goes blind permanently and his face completely maimed for life. They should have thinked at least twice before commiting the crime.


What if you tripped or otherwise fell, breaking the bottle in the process? What kind of bottle is best to carry this specific, and dangerous, acid? It would seem to be an efficient way to prevent this person from committing future crimes.

Tripping, in the falling over sense of the word, and breaking the bottle in the process would be a sure way of preventing any guy from commiting future crimes, in particular reproducing.
In the words of the late great Jerry Lee Lewis..............."Goodness gracious great balls of fire " :lol:
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Re: Moving to Lima

Postby chi chi » Sun Jun 15, 2014 2:14 pm

ironchefchris wrote:
chi chi wrote:Battery acid. A criminal goes blind permanently and his face completely maimed for life. They should have thinked at least twice before commiting the crime.


Have you had to use this? If so, where? How many times? Do you really "always carry" it with you? Do you keep this spray bottle in your pocket? Are you worried about the bottle breaking or leaking, however you carry it? What if you tripped or otherwise fell, breaking the bottle in the process? What kind of bottle is best to carry this specific, and dangerous, acid? It would seem to be an efficient way to prevent this person from committing future crimes.


I meant that I always carry it when I have to go to a dogdy área like some áreas in Lima. I stick the spray in another small plastic box in case it leaks and in a bag I carry.
Of course, I don't recommend to hide it in your underwear next to your private parts. :shock:
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Re: Moving to Lima

Postby teamoperu » Mon Jun 16, 2014 9:50 am

Robbers are so polite in Peru, especially when you ask them to wait while you reach into your bag, take out a plastic box and open it to withdraw a sealed bottle of acid, open it and spray the robbers without getting anything on you.
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Re: Moving to Lima

Postby ironchefchris » Mon Jun 16, 2014 10:48 am

I'm still waiting to find out if chi chi's ever had to use his spray bottle of battery acid on anyone, and if so, how many times? It would go a long way in proving what a dangerous city Lima is.

Also, when traveling to Lima how does one carry a bottle of battery acid with them? Is it allowed as a carry-on? If not allowed in the cabin, do you worry that a nosy flight attendant might pat you down and discover it? Can you check it in your luggage? Do you leave it at home, take your chances while traveling, and after arriving in Lima go to where you can buy battery acid and a bottle? Is it the first thing you do after arriving in Lima?
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Re: Moving to Lima

Postby Sergio Bernales » Mon Jun 16, 2014 10:58 am

Hey, Lima's not safe for Chi Chi. The local kindergarten has a hit out on him after he revealed their nefarious activities.
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Re: Moving to Lima

Postby ironchefchris » Mon Jun 16, 2014 1:15 pm

Sergio Bernales wrote:Hey, Lima's not safe for Chi Chi. The local kindergarten has a hit out on him after he revealed their nefarious activities.


Nice try, Sergio, but those kids don't look a day over five to me. They've got a good two years before they're doing hits for S/. 150. I wonder if there are seven year old cleaners who dispose of the bodies once their like aged compadres do their dirty work? Do they also work for the bargain price of S/. 150? I'd love to make a documentary film on these kids and their lives/work; chi chi, can you put me in touch? This has Oscar for Best Documentary written all over it. I'd make you Co-Producer if you're interested. This is the type of film that could make a career and lead to other work. Guaranteed you could get off the welfare rolls and make an honest living on this.
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Re: Moving to Lima

Postby panman » Mon Jun 16, 2014 1:40 pm

ironchefchris wrote:
Sergio Bernales wrote:Hey, Lima's not safe for Chi Chi. The local kindergarten has a hit out on him after he revealed their nefarious activities.


Nice try, Sergio, but those kids don't look a day over five to me. They've got a good two years before they're doing hits for S/. 150. I wonder if there are seven year old cleaners who dispose of the bodies once their like aged compadres do their dirty work? Do they also work for the bargain price of S/. 150? I'd love to make a documentary film on these kids and their lives/work; chi chi, can you put me in touch? This has Oscar for Best Documentary written all over it. I'd make you Co-Producer if you're interested. This is the type of film that could make a career and lead to other work. Guaranteed you could get off the welfare rolls and make an honest living on this.

Here's an idea, you could update this commercial, with a Peruvian twist.
http://youtu.be/ZM8h7Yc3zfc
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Re: Moving to Lima

Postby Sergio Bernales » Mon Jun 16, 2014 2:00 pm

ironchefchris wrote:
Sergio Bernales wrote:Hey, Lima's not safe for Chi Chi. The local kindergarten has a hit out on him after he revealed their nefarious activities.


Nice try, Sergio, but those kids don't look a day over five to me. They've got a good two years before they're doing hits for S/. 150. I wonder if there are seven year old cleaners who dispose of the bodies once their like aged compadres do their dirty work? Do they also work for the bargain price of S/. 150? I'd love to make a documentary film on these kids and their lives/work; chi chi, can you put me in touch? This has Oscar for Best Documentary written all over it. I'd make you Co-Producer if you're interested. This is the type of film that could make a career and lead to other work. Guaranteed you could get off the welfare rolls and make an honest living on this.


That's because they start their training early. It's rare to get photos of a fully-trained pint-sized hitman, as they are such professional creatures, they keep to the shadows. I doubt you'll get any to talk for the documentary.
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Re: Moving to Lima

Postby ironchefchris » Mon Jun 16, 2014 6:43 pm

Sergio Bernales wrote:
ironchefchris wrote:
Sergio Bernales wrote:Hey, Lima's not safe for Chi Chi. The local kindergarten has a hit out on him after he revealed their nefarious activities.


Nice try, Sergio, but those kids don't look a day over five to me. They've got a good two years before they're doing hits for S/. 150. I wonder if there are seven year old cleaners who dispose of the bodies once their like aged compadres do their dirty work? Do they also work for the bargain price of S/. 150? I'd love to make a documentary film on these kids and their lives/work; chi chi, can you put me in touch? This has Oscar for Best Documentary written all over it. I'd make you Co-Producer if you're interested. This is the type of film that could make a career and lead to other work. Guaranteed you could get off the welfare rolls and make an honest living on this.


That's because they start their training early. It's rare to get photos of a fully-trained pint-sized hitman, as they are such professional creatures, they keep to the shadows. I doubt you'll get any to talk for the documentary.


Everybody wants to be on TV or the subject of a movie. Here's how I'd do it. We meet in a public place, both for the kids/hitmen's safety and for my and chi chi's safety. chi chi would probably bring along the spray bottle filled with battery acid for a little extra sense of security. Kid's like ice cream, right? I'd suggest someplace with a little class that they probably don't go to all that often such as 4-D. Maybe the one at the airport as it would be hard for anyone to pull any 'funny stuff.' As long as they want to talk, we're buying the exotic flavors of ice cream they don't get from their local D'Onfrio vendor on the street, so it's a treat. They're eating it up, we're getting our stories. Classic Win-Win situation. In post-production we pixelate their faces and manipulate their voices so they can't be identified. Dropping their voices an octave or three has the added benefit of making them sound more ominous. chi chi, let's get on this. Oscar is in our collective futures!
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Re: Moving to Lima

Postby chi chi » Mon Jun 16, 2014 10:15 pm

ironchefchris wrote:I'm still waiting to find out if chi chi's ever had to use his spray bottle of battery acid on anyone, and if so, how many times? It would go a long way in proving what a dangerous city Lima is.


I never had to use it.

Other things to fend an attacker off is holding a key between you fingers and stick it to the attackers eye.
Another way to fend of a robber is to kick him with the flat of your foot on his knee by full forcé. You break his leg.

I learned about self defence during my flight attendant training.
Even how to knock someone out with the axe that you find on every aircraft.
And how to restrain a passenger and put the handcuffs on.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f4MRmEPNUxY
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Re: Moving to Lima

Postby ironchefchris » Mon Jun 16, 2014 10:50 pm

I never knew there was an axe on every aircraft. It's not in the flight cabin or accessible to the passengers I hope? Does the fact that you haven't used battery acid on anyone mean that on a personal level Lima is just as dangerous as Tarapoto? And what of contacting some of these seven year old hitmen so we can get a documentary going? I'm telling you, take your tux to the cleaners and get ready because I'm talking Oscar!
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Re: Moving to Lima

Postby chi chi » Mon Jun 16, 2014 11:04 pm

ironchefchris wrote:I never knew there was an axe on every aircraft. It's not in the flight cabin or accessible to the passengers I hope?


Don't worry it's not accesible to the passengers. It's stowed in the F/D.

The axe is used by the flight attendants to break panels in case of a fire so they can extinguish a fire.

In case of a fire in the restroom and the door is hot, a small hole is knocked in the toilet door and the nozzle of the BCF is inserted and BCF is discharged.
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Re: Moving to Lima

Postby chi chi » Tue Jun 17, 2014 11:28 am

If you stick to the busy áreas during the day and you dress conservatively and don't wear flashy bling-bling then the chances that you will get robbed will be very small.

There's so much poverty in Lima. Walking around with a lot of cash in your backpocket or wearing jewellry works like a magnet on thieves.
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Re: Moving to Lima

Postby ironchefchris » Tue Jun 17, 2014 11:31 am

TheProducer wrote:7 year old Hit Men in Peru? Peru has many strange things but I think 7 year old Hit Men is a bit of a stretch. Do you actually believe that?


Are you actually questioning chi chi?

chi chi wrote:There are many people burried in the desert just outside Lima. It only cost 150 soles to get someone wacked by a professional hitman. Most hitman are between 7 and 14 years old so because of their age they can't be punished by law. The pólice can just beg to no please kill no more people.
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Re: Moving to Lima

Postby chi chi » Tue Jun 17, 2014 12:14 pm

ironchefchris wrote:
TheProducer wrote:7 year old Hit Men in Peru? Peru has many strange things but I think 7 year old Hit Men is a bit of a stretch. Do you actually believe that?


Are you actually questioning chi chi?

chi chi wrote:There are many people burried in the desert just outside Lima. It only cost 150 soles to get someone wacked by a professional hitman. Most hitman are between 7 and 14 years old so because of their age they can't be punished by law. The pólice can just beg to no please kill no more people.



You want some young hitmen, here they are:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... erges.html
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Re: Moving to Lima

Postby ironchefchris » Tue Jun 17, 2014 1:30 pm

chi chi wrote:You want some young hitmen, here they are:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... erges.html


I'm not looking for just "some young hitmen." I'm looking to get the story of the seven year old hitmen (and cleaners) in Peru you mentioned. The ones who bury their victims in the deserts outside of Lima. Interesting article you linked to, but Baghdad doesn't interest me as I'm not willing to travel that far at the moment. Besides, someone else has already told their story where I think the stories of the young hitmen of Lima is ripe to be told. Let's do this. I wanna win an Oscar!
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Re: Moving to Lima

Postby lij317 » Sat Jul 12, 2014 10:13 am

Wow. First of all, thank you everyone for your responses. I really appreciate your advice. As far as the battery acid subject, I´m going to go ahead and hold off on that purchase for a while!

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