Where Do Your Kids Go To School?

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Where Do Your Kids Go To School?

International School
6
30%
Other Private School - Non-Spanish Speaking
0
No votes
Other Private School - Spanish Speaking
7
35%
Peruvian Public School
1
5%
Home School
6
30%
 
Total votes: 20
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Kelly
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Where Do Your Kids Go To School?

Postby Kelly » Fri Mar 16, 2012 2:03 pm

Not talking about a specific school here, but more along the lines of what type of schooling you are sending them too.

Our boys are going to a mid-level private school, all Spanish speaking, although they do have 4 hours weekly of English. Of course, my kids are Peruvian, so it makes since to send them to a Spanish speaking school.


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Re: Where Do Your Kids Go To School?

Postby susita83 » Fri Mar 16, 2012 2:33 pm

Great idea for a poll... I'm interested in seeing the results :D
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Re: Where Do Your Kids Go To School?

Postby falconagain » Fri Mar 16, 2012 2:54 pm

I do not have children. But has anyone been able to find a good homeschooling
program. If I have any children I would not like to have them expose to the
high school education that is currently available in Peru. Having studied
under that system I would not like them to start life with a disadvantage.
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Re: Where Do Your Kids Go To School?

Postby Kelly » Fri Mar 16, 2012 3:22 pm

What disadvantages specifically would you say you suffered from?
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Re: Where Do Your Kids Go To School?

Postby falconagain » Fri Mar 16, 2012 6:38 pm

The level of knowledge imparted during school did not match the required level
of knowledge by the normal colleges within the city. Colleges required their
students to be up to International Standards (using the admission exam as
a filter). Usually 95% percent of students had to go through cramming academies
in order to be able to pass the admission exams. Still cramming is not understanding
and there were many gaps within what you studied in high school and what was
required for you to stay in college. Example the Ministry of Education influenced
the majority of high schools to remove International History and study of any
International Literature up to the year 95, the excuse; because it is better for
students to learn about their country first; or that chemistry courses were allowed
to be finished at half of the required lessons in many high schools, actually the
ones that could not afford the lab, skipped the course.

Now the above problems happened in the 1990s only, now the situation is
worse as colleges have started to fight students and they have also lowered
the standards in the basic requirements of math, reading and experimental
practice. All this was verified by the UNESCO PISA study where Peru usually
the country with the lowest scores worldwide. Looks like the Ministry of
Education did its job and continued to lower the country standards even
more.
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Re: Where Do Your Kids Go To School?

Postby stuart » Fri Mar 16, 2012 7:35 pm

As I understand it that 2001 UNESCO study placed Peru in the lowest position in Latin America with over 80% of students at the lowest level possible in reading, mathematics and science... Peru was one of the lowest ranked in the entire world, we're talking bottom few. The remaining 20% of the population also scored poorly.

Sadly, it shows. Ask someone what an electron is, where Eritrea is or what century the industrial revolution kicked off and you will be met with blank stares. This is true even in the middle classes and up. Hopefully things are changing.
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Re: Where Do Your Kids Go To School?

Postby sunflower » Fri Mar 16, 2012 8:43 pm

My kids go to an international school with a strict curriculum based on German and Peruvian education laws. Personally I think that will enable them later to either go back to Europe to study or make their way there or to stay in Peru and pass the necessary exams to enter the university they want to go to.
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Re: Where Do Your Kids Go To School?

Postby falconagain » Fri Mar 16, 2012 9:48 pm

stuart wrote:As I understand it that 2001 UNESCO study placed Peru in the lowest position in Latin America with over 80% of students at the lowest level possible in reading, mathematics and science... Peru was one of the lowest ranked in the entire world, we're talking bottom few. The remaining 20% of the population also scored poorly.

Sadly, it shows. Ask someone what an electron is, where Eritrea is or what century the industrial revolution kicked off and you will be met with blank stares. This is true even in the middle classes and up. Hopefully things are changing.


Actually Peru reached the lowest position in the world on the 2002 UNESCO study, since then the Peruvian
Education Ministry says that is trying to improve the situation, still on the same UNESCO for 2010 Peru
is still at the bottom but with 2 countries below us (one of them I think is the country of Borat).
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Re: Where Do Your Kids Go To School?

Postby Kelly » Fri Mar 16, 2012 11:01 pm

The world outside of Peru is sadly very much lacking in the curriculum. World history, world geography, politics etc. At least they haven't had to make a model "costa, sierra, selva" since they entered secondary!

I know my kids have a pretty good reading list this year - Don Quixote, Uncle Tom's Cabin, Huckleberry Finn, and Dante's Inferno are a few of the books my 8th grader is reading.

And as far as maths and science go, they're working far in advance of what my niece of the same age is doing in the US.
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Re: Where Do Your Kids Go To School?

Postby koplinfamilia » Sat Mar 17, 2012 10:53 am

falconagain wrote:I do not have children. But has anyone been able to find a good homeschooling
program. If I have any children I would not like to have them expose to the
high school education that is currently available in Peru. Having studied
under that system I would not like them to start life with a disadvantage.


First you have to define "good" as many people home school with different objectives. There are literally 100's of programs to choose from in the USA and they all market different angles. If you want something rigerous (acedemic) you have the freedom to make your own program, add as much to it as you like (and your child is comfortable with). This is one of the great benefits of home schooling, you can add so many more facets to schooling than can a traditional school. Languages, athletics, music, world travel, religion are just to name a few and you can give them much more hands-on opportunities in these areas. If your child likes science, add in additional projects he is interested in, mathmetics, history the same.

We use a simple bible based program (the kids are only kinder level) which is meets all US standards and then we supplement with individual things like mathmetics that I may want to challenge them more in. We read a lot too, the sky is the limit, you just have to find what works best for you and your family.
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Re: Where Do Your Kids Go To School?

Postby leidulvstad » Wed Mar 21, 2012 10:32 pm

Also interested in seeing the results. I want to meet other homeschoolers :-)
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Re: Where Do Your Kids Go To School?

Postby lizzym » Thu Mar 22, 2012 6:03 pm

I know my kids have a pretty good reading list this year - Don Quixote, Uncle Tom's Cabin, Huckleberry Finn, and Dante's Inferno are a few of the books my 8th grader is reading.



When I worked at an editorial that marketed to secondary schools here in Lima, I was disappointed to learn that most of the reading taking place in schools was centered around adaptations, and rarely involved original works (whether translations of foreign books or the originals in Spanish.) The quality of these adaptations was usually a straight-up disservice to literature in general - rife with typos (this is supposed to help students learn their language), and usually closer to a back cover summary than they were to the original books. The explanation that the editor gave me for this was that Peru has something like the lowest level of reading comprehension in the world (don't know if that's true, just what he said.) No wonder, if kids are getting dumbed-down versions of everything.

I'd be curious to know which if any schools in Lima don't make their students read only or primarily adaptations. The people who make these adaptations often have zero training in the study of literature, local or otherwise, and get into the business because it can be lucrative when they have exclusivity deals with several schools (which itself is illegal).
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Re: Where Do Your Kids Go To School?

Postby Kelly » Thu Mar 22, 2012 10:00 pm

Myy older kid read Uncle Tom's Cabin last year and it was a straight translation - I went along with him in the Cliff notes online so I could help him work on the themes. I don't know about the editions that they're using this year, we haven't bought them yet.
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Re: Where Do Your Kids Go To School?

Postby pupsrcool » Sat Sep 01, 2012 2:53 pm

Hello, I am a U.S. citizen married to a Peruvian; my kids are dual citizens, but at this point we have no plans to move to the States. I want to homeschool my kids (the poor literary background and low reading comprehension scores as well as the international scores for Peru being among the lowest being only a part of my reasons). My son is 4 1/2 and has another year of preschool before I actually start with the homeschool program for him, while my daughter is 3, and has yet to recieve any formal education. I would love to meet other homeschool families, expat or otherwise, to arrange for field trips (paseos), mutually support each other in our homeschool endeavors, and play dates. I would also be very happy to add my voice to those desiring to legalize (and develop some legal recognition for) homeschooling and to be able to send their children to a university or high school. Some standardized tests, like they had in the States, could easily resolve the problem. Any ideas what we should do to help facilitate homeschooling in Peru?

My email is [email protected], for anyone wanting to get together as homeschoolers.
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Re: Where Do Your Kids Go To School?

Postby Alpineprince » Sat Sep 01, 2012 11:26 pm

Any word on the Innova schools run by Interbank?
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Re: Where Do Your Kids Go To School?

Postby craig » Sun Sep 02, 2012 2:33 pm

I found it interesting to read this thread and all the condemnation of Peruvian schools.

Now, I don't have any recent experience with Peruvian schools. However, I currently teach American students. My students are the products of the American educational system of the last few decades. I also meet ordinary Peruvians all the time. And my observation is that the random Peruvians I meet on the street are far better educated and more literate than my American students.

Of course, many Americans learn well in spite of the public education system or by being home schooled and my students are not among those better ones. Nevertheless, the illiteracy rate in the US is approaching 50%. Mathematics and science are seldom taught at all. There has been no foreign language instruction for decades. History has been replaced by fabricated propaganda. However bad Peru may be, it is better than that!

American students are largely unable and/or unwilling to study any serious subjects in college. More than half of all graduate students at American universities are foreigners these days. Americans are simply no longer capable of doing the work.

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Re: Where Do Your Kids Go To School?

Postby Jalapenomel » Sun Sep 02, 2012 8:25 pm

craig wrote:I found it interesting to read this thread and all the condemnation of Peruvian schools.

Now, I don't have any recent experience with Peruvian schools. However, I currently teach American students. My students are the products of the American educational system of the last few decades. I also meet ordinary Peruvians all the time. And my observation is that the random Peruvians I meet on the street are far better educated and more literate than my American students.

Of course, many Americans learn well in spite of the public education system or by being home schooled and my students are not among those better ones. Nevertheless, the illiteracy rate in the US is approaching 50%. Mathematics and science are seldom taught at all. There has been no foreign language instruction for decades. History has been replaced by fabricated propaganda. However bad Peru may be, it is better than that!

American students are largely unable and/or unwilling to study any serious subjects in college. More than half of all graduate students at American universities are foreigners these days. Americans are simply no longer capable of doing the work.


Craig
I have no idea where you have come up with this, but it is absolutely not true at all. This is truly bizarre of you to say.
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Re: Where Do Your Kids Go To School?

Postby craig » Sun Sep 02, 2012 11:19 pm

Literacy Education-Teaching Literacy
It has been estimated that while 99% of persons over the age of fifteen in the United States are able to write their names, and read some words, certain studies have estimated that 40 to 50% of adults are functionally illiterate.
The phrase functionally illiterate describes those persons over the age of fiteen who are unable to read well enough to read a daily newspaper and comprehend it, or to read well enough to understand a simple contract, or a basic letter concerning their children's school needs, or the pamphlets that are enclosed with prescription drugs that explain side effects and precautions.

Literacy Rate - How Many Are Illiterate
The literacy rate in the US has many educators in search of answers about this problem that has plagued our country for decades. Instead of decreasing, the numbers of literacy has steadily increased over the years. This raises a lot of questions about our education system, how it is ran, and why there is such a problem with illiterate people in our country.
...
In the US, adults with a high level of literacy are at 19%, a low level of literacy are at 49.6% and a moderate level of literacy at 31.4%. That difference in literacy rates are outstanding.

Note that the author of this article (probably a California teacher) cannot even compose coherent, grammatical sentences. :cry:
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Re: Where Do Your Kids Go To School?

Postby Jalapenomel » Mon Sep 03, 2012 7:58 pm

craig wrote:Literacy Education-Teaching Literacy
It has been estimated that while 99% of persons over the age of fifteen in the United States are able to write their names, and read some words, certain studies have estimated that 40 to 50% of adults are functionally illiterate.
The phrase functionally illiterate describes those persons over the age of fiteen who are unable to read well enough to read a daily newspaper and comprehend it, or to read well enough to understand a simple contract, or a basic letter concerning their children's school needs, or the pamphlets that are enclosed with prescription drugs that explain side effects and precautions.

Literacy Rate - How Many Are Illiterate
The literacy rate in the US has many educators in search of answers about this problem that has plagued our country for decades. Instead of decreasing, the numbers of literacy has steadily increased over the years. This raises a lot of questions about our education system, how it is ran, and why there is such a problem with illiterate people in our country.
...
In the US, adults with a high level of literacy are at 19%, a low level of literacy are at 49.6% and a moderate level of literacy at 31.4%. That difference in literacy rates are outstanding.

Note that the author of this article (probably a California teacher) cannot even compose coherent, grammatical sentences. :cry:
What is this site? Who are the authors and the credentials?

You also mentioned that they aren't learning math or science. Where did you come up with this? Where I am just came from, the math and science rates were through the roof...kids were acing the ACTs and SATs, getting accepted to Stanford and MIT.
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Re: Where Do Your Kids Go To School?

Postby Jalapenomel » Mon Sep 03, 2012 8:11 pm

According to the CIA, the literacy rate is 1%: https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/us.html

According to this article in Live Science, 14% of people are illiterate in the US: http://www.livescience.com/3211-14-percent-adults-read.html

And the Education Portal states it is between 19-23%: http://education-portal.com/articles/Illiteracy_The_Downfall_of_American_Society.html

Clearly, this is a far cry from 50%.
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Re: Where Do Your Kids Go To School?

Postby heddo7 » Fri Nov 16, 2012 1:17 am

Hi Everyone!

We are moving to Lima in January, and will be homeschooling our kids using a mix of Montessori and Kolbe Academy. We have three kids, oldest being 4 in Jan and just getting ready to start, but we're so excited already!

I would love to meet up with other families for play-dates & homeschooling support, once we get there.
Our apt is in La Molina, please PM me or email me and let me know who you are : )

Thanks!
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Re: Where Do Your Kids Go To School?

Postby Suncha » Sat Nov 17, 2012 8:03 pm

We are Radical Unschoolers, I'd love to meet up w other homeschoolers in Lima. We are in Miraflores.
Send me a message here and maybe we can start a meetup group for homeschoolers in Lima.
I have a 18 mo, 4 yo, 8yo, 13yo, 18 yo.
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Re: Where Do Your Kids Go To School?

Postby leschatnoir » Wed May 29, 2013 7:08 pm

Jalapenomel wrote:
craig wrote:I found it interesting to read this thread and all the condemnation of Peruvian schools.

Now, I don't have any recent experience with Peruvian schools. However, I currently teach American students. My students are the products of the American educational system of the last few decades. I also meet ordinary Peruvians all the time. And my observation is that the random Peruvians I meet on the street are far better educated and more literate than my American students.

Of course, many Americans learn well in spite of the public education system or by being home schooled and my students are not among those better ones. Nevertheless, the illiteracy rate in the US is approaching 50%. Mathematics and science are seldom taught at all. There has been no foreign language instruction for decades. History has been replaced by fabricated propaganda. However bad Peru may be, it is better than that!

American students are largely unable and/or unwilling to study any serious subjects in college. More than half of all graduate students at American universities are foreigners these days. Americans are simply no longer capable of doing the work.


Craig
I have no idea where you have come up with this, but it is absolutely not true at all. This is truly bizarre of you to say.


Craig is using a flawed incoherent blurb form an unnamed website in order to support his argument that 50% of Americans are illiterate, while also saying the person who is making his point is illiterate???
Literacy rates and quality of schools in America greatly vary depending on their locations and demographics. I am sure it is the same in Peru.

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