SAE Donations

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SAE Donations

Postby limaclub » Wed Oct 30, 2013 1:19 pm

Jim Killon will be doing a presentation at the SAE clubhouse on 956 Enrique Palacios Miraflores on Wednesday the 6th November about his non profit organisation in Huaraz called Changes for new hope http://www.changesfornewhope.org/ which works in helping children from poor back grounds get a better education. Jim will also be talking about his book "A Gringo in Peru-A Story of Compassion in Action".

If anyone would like to donate child vitamins to help the children at Changes For New Hope i´m sure Jim would greatly appreciate it! We at SAE would like to thank everyone that donated clothes to one of the renters who is an anthropologist who will take these clothes out to the tribes people who he stays with. He will be taking at least 3 giant bags of clothes out when he returns back later this year and i´m sure this will be greatly appreciated by the locals of the tribe!

Once again thank you so much to those that donated!

Saludos

South American Explorers
956 Enrique Palacios
Miraflores
Tel: 444 2150
Last edited by limaclub on Thu Oct 31, 2013 12:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.


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Re: SAE Donations

Postby teamoperu » Thu Oct 31, 2013 8:04 am

Since this is posted in the Conversation sub-forum...

This makes the hair on my neck stand up. White man hand delivers bags of used clothing and trinkets to the locals of the tribe... you know, the tribes people he stays with... I do not know the man, nor anything about his project, but have seen similar far too many times in Peru...

Is he really a working anthropologist (not a sales pitch man) and from where is his degree? What does hand delivering bags of used clothing got to do with anthropology? Does he know the Prime Directive? Tribes in Huaraz? Like I say, I do not know this man, but I have met many others with similar projects while we sip piscos up front in Biz class the airplane.
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby alan » Fri Nov 01, 2013 12:48 pm

teamoperu wrote:Since this is posted in the Conversation sub-forum...

This makes the hair on my neck stand up. White man hand delivers bags of used clothing and trinkets to the locals of the tribe... you know, the tribes people he stays with... I do not know the man, nor anything about his project, but have seen similar far too many times in Peru...

Is he really a working anthropologist (not a sales pitch man) and from where is his degree? What does hand delivering bags of used clothing got to do with anthropology? Does he know the Prime Directive? Tribes in Huaraz? Like I say, I do not know this man, but I have met many others with similar projects while we sip piscos up front in Biz class the airplane.



Hi TeamofPeru.. I think you read the post too quickly. The SAE mentions two people... Jim Killon and a renter at the SAE. Jim doesn´t present himself as an antrhopologist (really, I don´t know what his background is), but I can tell you that he has been working very hard in the Huaraz region trying to get educational access for the extremely poor there.

I hope your post doesn´t discourage people from attenting Jim´s talk. He seems to be doing some good work there.

http://www.changesfornewhope.org
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby teamoperu » Fri Nov 01, 2013 7:17 pm

Thanks Alan, for noticing. Yes, two people being juxtaposed. A appropriate paragraph break after the exclamation mark would have helped avoid this confusion. Maybe the hairs on my neck stood up because of the second person.

But even Mr Killon seems to agree that some caution, listening to those hairs, might be appropriate. I'll quote Jim's blog: “My meeting with the new volunteer coordinator was equally disturbing. Alex told me, "Jim, come on man! Do you really think that any of us are actually making real changes in the world? When volunteers come to Peru and help some kids with their homework and hug them, is it really the turning of the tide of poverty or despair? Let me tell you how it is; we bring in volunteers who pay a fee to the NGO and spend some time with children they work with. They feel good doing it and feel that they made some altruistic accomplishment to put on their resume' when they return to their home countries. It is mental masturbation for them. They pay us to feel good for a month or two in South America. If you believe anything to the contrary, you are deceiving yourself."

http://www.changesfornewhope.org/blog.html

According to the blog, Mr Jim Killon's hard work is different: “We have children who were trained little thieves, liars and con artists, who no longer consider that way of life an option. We have children with better grades in school, better attitudes, better self esteem and believe that they have a future in front of them. They are healthier because we give them vitamins and medicines, they wear clothes that fit and are not shabby. They sleep warmly under thermal blankets that we provide, use wind up lanterns that gives them light in homes where there is no electricity. School supplies, recreational games and toys, as well as love and security that we provide for them as we teach them how to become fine young men and women as they grow up.”

Colour me cautious.
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby alan » Fri Nov 01, 2013 10:02 pm

teamoperu wrote:

But even Mr Killon seems to agree that some caution, listening to those hairs, might be appropriate. I'll quote Jim's blog: “My meeting with the new volunteer coordinator was equally disturbing. Alex told me, "Jim, come on man! Do you really think that any of us are actually making real changes in the world? When volunteers come to Peru and help some kids with their homework and hug them, is it really the turning of the tide of poverty or despair? Let me tell you how it is; we bring in volunteers who pay a fee to the NGO and spend some time with children they work with. They feel good doing it and feel that they made some altruistic accomplishment to put on their resume' when they return to their home countries. It is mental masturbation for them. They pay us to feel good for a month or two in South America. If you believe anything to the contrary, you are deceiving yourself."

http://www.changesfornewhope.org/blog.html .”



I think he is partly right: some of the volunteer work that goes on is pretty superficial, and the "recipient" might have been better served if the volunteer had stayed at home and forwarded the money he/she would have spent on airfare and hotels. But on the other hand, volunteers go home with an enhanced idea of what it is to live in a developing country, and the reality of people living in absolute poverty. I would guess that this experience shapes their future actions, from who they chose to donate to, from what field they chose to work in, and even who they vote for. As for having an impact on poverty.. he´s right..it probably doesn´t even scratch the surface. Just look at Peru: 2 million or more living on 1 dollar a day, and how many overseas volunteers? Maybe a couple thousand? ..and even that´s a generous number.

There are some very nice examples of people who came for a short period and then decided to devote their lives to helping people in Peru. I think Jim is one of them. Another is Diana Bowie, who started DB Peru, which brings volunteers into the Amazon to deliver health care. Her project has really taken off.
(learn more here: http://www.dbperuong.com) There are probably many other good examples, but yes, I agree with you 100%, it´s important to view these case by case. I hope to make it to hear Jim at the SAE.. we have gotten to know each other via email over the past few years, but I have never had the pleasure to meet him in person.

Thoughts from others regarding the impact of volunteer programs in Peru?
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby Tracyrteach » Tue Nov 05, 2013 11:40 am

I personally had a fantastic experience working as an educational volunteer at the Centro Ann Sullivan in San Miguel. The educational center works with children and young adults with autism and Down syndrome. I volunteered three days a week for about four months and it led me to becoming a special education teacher and later administrator in NYC. I found that assignment at the SAE clubhouse years ago and happened to have bumped into a former student and his mother in Miraflores and they remembered me after nine years. Meaningful volunteer experiences do in fact exist

Is the SAE still accepting donations of books, materials or other items?
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby limaclub » Thu Nov 07, 2013 11:35 am

Hi Tracy
yes SAE is still accepting donations. Any donation made would be more than welcome. The clubhouse is located at 956 Enrique Palacios.

We would also like to thank those that came for the Jim Killon presentation last night. Jims presentation highlighted some of the problems with Non profit organisations that end up causing people to be cynical about these types of organisations which was highlighted by Teamoperu in an earlier post.

There also seems to be some confusion as well as to the Anthropologist. I would like to say he is not involved in any way with a non profit organisation,have a project to help people, a sales pitch person or definatly someone that travels business class.
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby teamoperu » Sun Nov 10, 2013 10:26 am

Well, if I was confused by the original post, I am even more confused about the anthropologist and his helping "the locals of the tribe" now.
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby teamoperu » Sun Nov 10, 2013 2:05 pm

OK, although it seems impossible to argue against foreigners helping poor kids in Peru, because it is like arguing against moms and apple pie, I will try because Jim Killon himself argues against it calling a NGOs president/director “a lecherous miscreant and donations expected to be used for the poor children were funding adult debauchery”. Who is to say he isn't doing the same? – not to suggest he is. NGOs at least have financial books that can be accessed, does he? NGOs are somehow accountable to someone, is he?

In Cuba, the phenomena of gringos arriving with suitcases full of Dollar Store junk and randomly gratuitously distributing it in a self-serving self-gratification exhibit of Northern largess has had terrible consequences. In fact, some communities and districts of Havana there have prohibited it. They no longer want their kids to be beg for handouts, expect gringos to be walking gift machines, be recipients of gringo self-flagellation. They wonder if the gringo is a small person is a big world in the USA, but wants to be a big person in the small pond of Cuba. They wonder why they are not helping poor people in their own community before imposing on Cuba, they see the news. They wonder why do they think Cubans cannot look after their own? Peruvians could ask all these questions too.

Mr Killon states: “We have children who were trained little thieves, liars and con artists, who no longer consider that way of life an option. We have children with better grades in school, better attitudes, better self esteem and believe that they have a future in front of them. They are healthier because we give them vitamins and medicines, they wear clothes that fit and are not shabby. They sleep warmly under thermal blankets that we provide, use wind up lanterns that gives them light in homes where there is no electricity. School supplies, recreational games and toys, as well as love and security that we provide for them as we teach them how to become fine young men and women as they grow up.”

OK, lets parse this. The suggestion that the kids of Huaraz communities are thieves, liars and con artists is insulting. Surely not all. So how exactly did Mr Killon filter out the good kids from the bad con artists and filter who could become “fine young men and women as they grow up”. How did he filter the theives from the non-theives or did assumae all are theives? How did he filter out those who would or would not become fine young men and women if he didn't show up to help, or does he assume all would become bad men and women but for his help?

“they wear clothes that fit and are not shabby” and “They sleep warmly under thermal blankets that we provide”. Well, they survived many decades using traditional Andean clothes and blankets. Sure, modern microfibers are technologically better, but really, traditional fabrics are inadequate?

Do wind up lanterns really make a huge difference in making them into fine your men and women? Is traditional life of rising with the sun sleeping when the sun does really so bad – and does constantly winding up a lantern makes a huge difference? Not likely, just more of the assumption that northern technology is better. Just like northern toys are better (“recreational games and toys”). Kids can play with a tin can and stick for hours, are Lego toys really so much better? A northern-style swing set so much better than a hemp rope? Why do Americans think American stuff is better?

A difference in kids moral lives goes beyond thinking all good things come from the north and the presence of gringos means free stuff. Mr Killon's presence means they do not have to steal any more, just sit there and a gringo will put it in your hands, so much better. Much better than feeling deprivations and getting up and doing something about it. Much better to receive handouts (he suggests he has provided 4 tons of stuff) from northerners.

OK, small points, it is just stuff after all, what harm can it do. The idea that “love and security that we provide for them as we teach them how to become fine young men and women as they grow up” seems more useful. But how is he providing them security by showing up once in a while? Yes, love and attention is key to growing up. But is he suggesting Huaraz children do not have love? My experience is that in Peru kids are loved, and almost spoiled, by not only parents but large extended family, grandparents, aunts, uncles. Most Peruvian kids I know do get love, lots of it. Is Huaraz somehow different? And is he really suggesting that him or volunteers showing up 4 time a year to give them such sincere love really makes a difference into making them fine young men and women?

“A serious concern is the emotional well being of the children. Self esteem was virtually non existent among the children before our arrival. They lived in depression, abuse and neglect and they felt worthless. We wanted to develop these children from the inside out, showing them they are valuable, important components of Peruvian society and they can grow into young adults one day with families of their own who they can share these values and character attributes. With the help of some psychologists, the love from some very special volunteers, and some simple materials such as art supplies, creative thinking projects and giving them responsibilities among their peer groups, we have been able to develop children from the inside out. A constant battle, everybody has relapses of confidence, but we believe that 'What you see and hear is what you become'. We also know that "Thoughts become things". As we mold the thinking of the children we have seen amazing results.”

OK, lets parse this. “Self esteem was virtually non existent among the children before our arrival” and “They lived in depression, abuse and neglect and they felt worthless.” Wow. How would he know about conditions before his arrival? Non-existent self-esteem and depression and neglect? Wow. This is not the Peru I know. What arrogant statements or is it just self-serving to say this? Come to think of it, I do not know a depressed or neglected child in Peru, do you? Poor yes, neglected no. I guess they must exist, how fortunate for Mr Killon that he was able to find entire communities near Huaraz full of them.

“The children have discovered a beautiful new person they never realized lived so close to them. It was their own new selves.” Really? Come on. And but for your gringo help they would never have found that truly wonderful person inside themselves. Not.

“As we mold the thinking of the children...” Wow. I am sure the parents really appreciate your molding their children for them, after all, they have shown they cannot. Afterall, without you their kids would be neglected and depressed. Let me tell you, some of the best parents and best kids I have met live in the Andes. The stories you are telling to promote yourself and get donations is an insult to these fine parents and fine kids I know.
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby teamoperu » Sun Nov 10, 2013 5:15 pm

I received an nice pm from SAE explaining some things, but will respect their decision to pm rather than post and divulge no more.... other than post this for balance to indicate there may well be good answers to some of my concerns.
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby JimKillon » Tue Nov 26, 2013 8:22 pm

While I appreciate the comments made regarding the NGO, Changes for New Hope and the efforts that we have invested to help the children living in impoverished conditions, perhaps some clarification needs to be made to put some things in perspective. I had to smile at Teamoperu's comments as I read them because I have addressed them from other skeptics throughout the years I have been in Huaraz. Some have been well meaning individuals who only wanted to understand who we were and exactly what we were doing before investing their own time and money to help us. Others have been closed minded and so ready to become combative regardless of glaring evidence that we are the "Real Deal", that I am resigned to take the position, "Never try to convince the unconvincible." I'm going to bet the farm that our ranting friend posting here is of the first ilk and respond with what illumination that I can share.
Teamoperu states,"Jim Killon himself argues against it calling a NGOs president/director “a lecherous miscreant and donations expected to be used for the poor children were funding adult debauchery”. Who is to say he isn't doing the same? – not to suggest he is. NGOs at least have financial books that can be accessed, does he? NGOs are somehow accountable to someone, is he?"
In response, the first NGO that I came to volunteer with was a disaster. My comments he quotes from my book, 'A Gringo in Peru-A Story of Compassion in Action' is not only accurate to describe the situation but mild. I did not want to make the book about the negatives, just what I saw and stepped away from to create my own NGO.
His comment, "Who is to say that he isn't doing the same thing?"
You may find it interesting to know that I created this project with my own personal life savings and received no donations from anyone for about the first two years. I normally do not mention that because it sounds like I am throwing flowers at myself, which is not my intention. I realized asking people to donate to a cause they never heard of or to a man who was an unknown was just too great a leap of faith for anyone. To put my own money and time where my mouth was closed the gap a tad. Regarding the question of accountability, there is not, to my knowledge, any watchdog group that monitors NGOs in Peru. That said, we are all answerable only to our own consciences and to those children that depend on us to be there for them everyday. I would submit that the evidence of our work and accomplishments would serve as the best measure of integrity and sincerity. Those who have visited with us and volunteered with us share our work back in their own countries happily.
Teamoperu's second concern is captured in his statement, "The suggestion that the kids of Huaraz communities are thieves, liars and con artists is insulting. Surely not all. So how exactly did Mr Killon filter out the good kids from the bad con artists and filter who could become “fine young men and women as they grow up”. How did he filter the theives from the non-theives or did assume all are theives? How did he filter out those who would or would not become fine young men and women if he didn't show up to help, or does he assume all would become bad men and women but for his help?"
I stated in my book that the children we worked with in the communities we chose were indeed little thieves and liars. No one suggested that the entire Huaraz populace under age 18 were such. When I created Changes for New Hope, it was to directly address problem children in the poorest of communities where I was sure to find the most challenging of issues. I was not disappointed, I found what I was looking for. Our core value, "Do the Right Thing" and an insistence that any children under our management would learn values, morals, respect for themselves and others and learn integrity, character building and related developments separated the "wheat from the chaff" so to speak. Those who were not interested, separated themselves. Do I assume that they would all have been lost had it not been for my arrival? No, but I submit that our project has made it infinitely easier for them to achieve that objective it that was a goal prior to our arrival. This was confirmed as well by the mayor of Huaraz at a community meeting in that barrio and he acknowledged and thanked me for our service there.
Teamoperu continues, " Do wind up lanterns really make a huge difference in making them into fine your men and women? Is traditional life of rising with the sun sleeping when the sun does really so bad – and does constantly winding up a lantern makes a huge difference? Not likely, just more of the assumption that northern technology is better. Just like northern toys are better (“recreational games and toys”). Kids can play with a tin can and stick for hours, are Lego toys really so much better? A northern-style swing set so much better than a hemp rope? Why do Americans think American stuff is better?"
The implementation of wind up lanterns have made a huge difference in adobe homes where there is no electricity. Childrens' first reaction upon receiving the first ones were "Now we can do our homework after dark". I originally got the idea after reading about an NGO in India that set up solar panels in the school so that children could study after dark. Education, as everyone is aware, is the single easiest, most cost effective solution to raise children out of poverty. Teamoperu's apparent oversight of such a well known fact is disturbing. Also, children have no inside bathrooms. At night they are scared to go outside so they wet the beds. Unsanitary conditions result. That is eliminated now. There are a dozen reasons why being able to see in the dark is a good idea. Equalling disturbing is Teamoperu's suggestion that legos and other toys from the north are superfluous and a "tin can and a stick" is sufficient. We have developed the creative thinking of all the children by providing 'thinking' toys and games. Building toys, puzzles, chess and checker sets and eye hand co-ordination toys have been so instrumental in the childrens' development that we have now determined to create a Toy/Game Library in Huaraz for the benefit of all children and also to bring them off the streets and give them challenging activities beyond the standard futball and volleyball.
Teamoperu, not taking a breath yet, continues, "OK, small points, it is just stuff after all, what harm can it do. The idea that “love and security that we provide for them as we teach them how to become fine young men and women as they grow up” seems more useful. But how is he providing them security by showing up once in a while? Yes, love and attention is key to growing up. But is he suggesting Huaraz children do not have love? My experience is that in Peru kids are loved, and almost spoiled, by not only parents but large extended family, grandparents, aunts, uncles. Most Peruvian kids I know do get love, lots of it. Is Huaraz somehow different? And is he really suggesting that him or volunteers showing up 4 time a year to give them such sincere love really makes a difference into making them fine young men and women?"
My response to his suggestion that we show up "Once in awhile" would be more accurate if he stated, "Every day except Sunday and then sometimes even then". As I stated above, we went into the areas of Huaraz that were the most desperate. Absent or abusive parents, there was evidence of widespread neglect. Children in their teens were taking care of younger siblings many years younger without oversight from family members of neighbors, for example. Granted most Peruvian families would put American family units to shame with their closeness and interaction. These stable families have not been my focus. They do not need to help of our NGO. To answer his question directly, yes, we feel that our ubiquitous presence in these areas have made a significant difference in the emotional well being of the children.
Leaving no stone unturned, Teamoperu continues,"OK, lets parse this. “Self esteem was virtually non existent among the children before our arrival” and “They lived in depression, abuse and neglect and they felt worthless.” Wow. How would he know about conditions before his arrival? Non-existent self-esteem and depression and neglect? Wow. This is not the Peru I know. What arrogant statements or is it just self-serving to say this? Come to think of it, I do not know a depressed or neglected child in Peru, do you? Poor yes, neglected no. I guess they must exist, how fortunate for Mr Killon that he was able to find entire communities near Huaraz full of them."
I am well informed about Peru prior to my arrival by the reams of reports that I have read, the hundreds of onsite interviews that I conducted and the evidence that I saw all around me after my arrival. If this is not the Peru that Teamoperu says he knows, then perhaps he should lift himself from his armchair that he is quarterbacking from and take a closer look outside of the evidently comfortable and affluent residential confines that he shares his points of view from. I trust that my responses are broadening the vision of anyone who has not seen nor experienced this part of Peru and this level of unfortunate folk. My statements are neither arrogant nor self serving as he suggests but personal observation which is why we have brought in the services of a clinical psychologist who has volunteered to help the situation. I found these "entire communities full of them" as he states, because I was looking specifically for them.
And yet he further avers, "
“The children have discovered a beautiful new person they never realized lived so close to them. It was their own new selves.” Really? Come on. And but for your gringo help they would never have found that truly wonderful person inside themselves. Not.
“As we mold the thinking of the children...” Wow. I am sure the parents really appreciate your molding their children for them, after all, they have shown they cannot. Afterall, without you their kids would be neglected and depressed. Let me tell you, some of the best parents and best kids I have met live in the Andes. The stories you are telling to promote yourself and get donations is an insult to these fine parents and fine kids I know."
My response to this seemingly more agitated and aggressive tort is one of simple explanation and clarification. If not for my gringo help...? If you were sick, could you get better without a doctor? Maybe, but it is much easier with help when it avails itself isn't it? In fact, we point the way, give the children a sense of direction, encouragement and the self esteem to advance themselves. We do not and can not carry anyone, load families with handouts, as you suggested, nor cripple the children with debility. Debility is inhibiting their own stimulated development but eliminating the need to do things for themselves on their own accord.
I take particular issue with the assertion that these accounts I share are in some way for self promotion purposes and to get donations. What we have done over the last 4 years at Changes for New Hope has been for the direct development and benefit of the children living in destitution and despair. It is a work of love and compassion that will continue and needs to continue whether we reach out to these little ones with reporters and cameras making documentaries of us as we go or we advance this project in complete obscurity. Donations may or may not arrive depending on a myriad of personal convictions of individuals. That is neither our focus nor our worry. We roll with what we have and do what we can, for as many as we can, for as long as we can.
I respect and appreciate your comments and opinions regardless of how far afield they are from reality. I trust that my responses have been useful in clarifying and enlightening you and anyone else who is, at the very least, curious about how an NGO makes this piece of the world a better place and at the most, causes you to forfeit your quadriplegic track coach mentality and join us or any other project of your choosing, to make a significant difference in the lives of the less fortunate as opposed to criticizing those whose lives are dedicated to a higher calling.
Live large, live deliberately,
Jim Killon
President/founder
Changes for New Hope
Huaraz Peru
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby teamoperu » Thu Nov 28, 2013 10:09 am

Wow. A hostile response, who would have thunk it.

“Teamoperu's apparent oversight of such a well known fact is disturbing.”

“our ranting friend”

“he should lift himself from his armchair that he is quarterbacking from and take a closer look outside of the evidently comfortable and affluent residential confines that he shares his points of view from.”

“My response to this seemingly more agitated and aggressive tort...”

“I respect and appreciate your comments and opinions regardless of how far afield they are from reality.”

“causes you to forfeit your quadriplegic track coach mentality and join us”


Well, rather than placating my concerns, you seem intent on confirming them. Are you passing on your approach to critical thinking to the children of Perú as part of your higher calling?

No wish to argue with you, don't have the time. When I get a moment I will write some thoughts in general about what I have seen with non-acountable rogue do-gooders in Perú.

As a positive comment, been there, done that with windup lanterns. Have found solar and LED technology really has improved enough to provide a far better option.
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby teamoperu » Fri Nov 29, 2013 9:13 am

OK. A quick search about the NGO Changes for New Hope reveals nothing but your glowing words about yourself. To save me time, for full disclosure could you please point me to the relevant documents, or post them? Where is this NGO registered? Where are the independently audited financial records, evidence that its money is not mixed with yours? The NGO's business plan and 5-year outlook? Mission statement, statement of values and ethics, accountability structure and complaint procedures? Where is the public bio of the principals and employees of the NGO, their history, qualifications and training? Also, sadly becuse of the reality of the modern world, do you do background and police checks of volunteers to check for criminality and peodophelia since you work with vulnerable children? With respect, who has done that on you? Indeed, who or what agency oversees your activity and what public records have they produced? I am looking for more than just your own glowing words about your higher calling and volunteer testimonials, I am looking for independent assessments of results, audited financials, documents in conformity to the laws of Perú. Since your NGO business is in Perú, where is your book for denuncias, as per INDECOPI? Do you have a school charter, sample contracts and indemnity forms given children/guardians, proof of recent safety inspections of your facility, proof of insurance?
You state you are working with a large number (100? ) of children on a daily basis. In your home country you would not be allowed to do what you say you are doing without the proper oversight, approvals, permissions and documentations for caring for vulnerable children. Surely equal due diligence is proper for your activities here in Perú, so my questions are not onerous or irrelevant.
And before you say you are a just a nice guy responding to a higher calling... you are transplanted Canada, right, the home of history of abuse at residential schools where terrible things were done by people of higher calling to aboriginal children from remote locations, no different from Andean children. What I am asking about is not excessive bureaucratic paperwork but rather due diligence, proper oversight and reporting, full and transparent accountability.
As an aside, you and the SAE have indicated you only work with troubled kids. I was told “Jim Killons organisation only helps children who are from dysfunctional families. Children whose parents are alcoholics or of low morals from the worst area of Huaraz, and he only accepts children from those backgrounds.” and you in your blog “the kids of Huaraz communities are thieves, liars and con artists” and you in your reply above “children we worked with in the communities we chose were indeed little thieves and liars.” and oddly “Changes for New Hope, ... was to directly address problem children in the poorest of communities where I was sure to find the most challenging of issues. I was not disappointed, I found what I was looking for.” Looking at the photos. Some of these kids don't seem old enough to go to school let alone participate in thievery and deception nor able to exhibit “self esteem was virtually non existent among the children before our arrival. They lived in depression, abuse and neglect and they felt worthless” or are on the verge of “the children have discovered a beautiful new person they never realized lived so close to them. It was their own new selves.” but of course, who could tell from photos, you have clinical diagnosis of their depression and proof of their thievery before you chose them.
I realize that you feel you are one of the “a few unique individuals have found that special oasis of peace and tranquility and love deep within themselves by touching the lives of others who need them” but with that comes the responsibility of transparency and honesty.
Of course, you don't have to answer me. You don't have to answer to anyone, right? Even though the children “under your management” are other people's children.
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby teamoperu » Sat Nov 30, 2013 6:45 am

Without the information available it is hard to know, but I sure hope this isn't a situation where someone comes to someone else's country, to teach someone else's children, without having any teaching qualifications or experience. No checks and balances, no accountability, no local partners, no legal foundation? I look at the volunteer form to see it does not require any qualifications except to give time and love to the kids. The story line seems to be pay the NGO some money and come and give bananas and love to depressed destitute deliquent abandoned un-loved children (hundreds of them) to miraculously make them into fine ethical adults.

Alan mentioned dpperu above. Their website is transparent. Listing their registration in USA and Organismo No Gubernamental Perú status, Board of Directors, including Peruvian partners, code of ethics, following the laws of USA and Peru, etc etc. Take a look at the difference between web sites, approach, professionalism and transparency. I think it makes the point better than I can. But who knows without better information, maybe there is an explanation?

http://www.dbperuong.com/index.html versus http://www.changesfornewhope.org/
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby ChristianPark » Tue Dec 03, 2013 2:04 am

JimKillon wrote:While I appreciate the comments made regarding the NGO, Changes for New Hope and the efforts that we have invested to help the children living in impoverished conditions, perhaps some clarification needs to be made to put some things in perspective. I had to smile at Teamoperu's comments as I read them because I have addressed them from other skeptics throughout the years I have been in Huaraz. Some have been well meaning individuals who only wanted to understand who we were and exactly what we were doing before investing their own time and money to help us. Others have been closed minded and so ready to become combative regardless of glaring evidence that we are the "Real Deal", that I am resigned to take the position, "Never try to convince the unconvincible." I'm going to bet the farm that our ranting friend posting here is of the first ilk and respond with what illumination that I can share.
Teamoperu states,"Jim Killon himself argues against it calling a NGOs president/director “a lecherous miscreant and donations expected to be used for the poor children were funding adult debauchery”. Who is to say he isn't doing the same? – not to suggest he is. NGOs at least have financial books that can be accessed, does he? NGOs are somehow accountable to someone, is he?"
In response, the first NGO that I came to volunteer with was a disaster. My comments he quotes from my book, 'A Gringo in Peru-A Story of Compassion in Action' is not only accurate to describe the situation but mild. I did not want to make the book about the negatives, just what I saw and stepped away from to create my own NGO.
His comment, "Who is to say that he isn't doing the same thing?"
You may find it interesting to know that I created this project with my own personal life savings and received no donations from anyone for about the first two years. I normally do not mention that because it sounds like I am throwing flowers at myself, which is not my intention. I realized asking people to donate to a cause they never heard of or to a man who was an unknown was just too great a leap of faith for anyone. To put my own money and time where my mouth was closed the gap a tad. Regarding the question of accountability, there is not, to my knowledge, any watchdog group that monitors NGOs in Peru. That said, we are all answerable only to our own consciences and to those children that depend on us to be there for them everyday. I would submit that the evidence of our work and accomplishments would serve as the best measure of integrity and sincerity. Those who have visited with us and volunteered with us share our work back in their own countries happily.
Teamoperu's second concern is captured in his statement, "The suggestion that the kids of Huaraz communities are thieves, liars and con artists is insulting. Surely not all. So how exactly did Mr Killon filter out the good kids from the bad con artists and filter who could become “fine young men and women as they grow up”. How did he filter the theives from the non-theives or did assume all are theives? How did he filter out those who would or would not become fine young men and women if he didn't show up to help, or does he assume all would become bad men and women but for his help?"
I stated in my book that the children we worked with in the communities we chose were indeed little thieves and liars. No one suggested that the entire Huaraz populace under age 18 were such. When I created Changes for New Hope, it was to directly address problem children in the poorest of communities where I was sure to find the most challenging of issues. I was not disappointed, I found what I was looking for. Our core value, "Do the Right Thing" and an insistence that any children under our management would learn values, morals, respect for themselves and others and learn integrity, character building and related developments separated the "wheat from the chaff" so to speak. Those who were not interested, separated themselves. Do I assume that they would all have been lost had it not been for my arrival? No, but I submit that our project has made it infinitely easier for them to achieve that objective it that was a goal prior to our arrival. This was confirmed as well by the mayor of Huaraz at a community meeting in that barrio and he acknowledged and thanked me for our service there.
Teamoperu continues, " Do wind up lanterns really make a huge difference in making them into fine your men and women? Is traditional life of rising with the sun sleeping when the sun does really so bad – and does constantly winding up a lantern makes a huge difference? Not likely, just more of the assumption that northern technology is better. Just like northern toys are better (“recreational games and toys”). Kids can play with a tin can and stick for hours, are Lego toys really so much better? A northern-style swing set so much better than a hemp rope? Why do Americans think American stuff is better?"
The implementation of wind up lanterns have made a huge difference in adobe homes where there is no electricity. Childrens' first reaction upon receiving the first ones were "Now we can do our homework after dark". I originally got the idea after reading about an NGO in India that set up solar panels in the school so that children could study after dark. Education, as everyone is aware, is the single easiest, most cost effective solution to raise children out of poverty. Teamoperu's apparent oversight of such a well known fact is disturbing. Also, children have no inside bathrooms. At night they are scared to go outside so they wet the beds. Unsanitary conditions result. That is eliminated now. There are a dozen reasons why being able to see in the dark is a good idea. Equalling disturbing is Teamoperu's suggestion that legos and other toys from the north are superfluous and a "tin can and a stick" is sufficient. We have developed the creative thinking of all the children by providing 'thinking' toys and games. Building toys, puzzles, chess and checker sets and eye hand co-ordination toys have been so instrumental in the childrens' development that we have now determined to create a Toy/Game Library in Huaraz for the benefit of all children and also to bring them off the streets and give them challenging activities beyond the standard futball and volleyball.
Teamoperu, not taking a breath yet, continues, "OK, small points, it is just stuff after all, what harm can it do. The idea that “love and security that we provide for them as we teach them how to become fine young men and women as they grow up” seems more useful. But how is he providing them security by showing up once in a while? Yes, love and attention is key to growing up. But is he suggesting Huaraz children do not have love? My experience is that in Peru kids are loved, and almost spoiled, by not only parents but large extended family, grandparents, aunts, uncles. Most Peruvian kids I know do get love, lots of it. Is Huaraz somehow different? And is he really suggesting that him or volunteers showing up 4 time a year to give them such sincere love really makes a difference into making them fine young men and women?"
My response to his suggestion that we show up "Once in awhile" would be more accurate if he stated, "Every day except Sunday and then sometimes even then". As I stated above, we went into the areas of Huaraz that were the most desperate. Absent or abusive parents, there was evidence of widespread neglect. Children in their teens were taking care of younger siblings many years younger without oversight from family members of neighbors, for example. Granted most Peruvian families would put American family units to shame with their closeness and interaction. These stable families have not been my focus. They do not need to help of our NGO. To answer his question directly, yes, we feel that our ubiquitous presence in these areas have made a significant difference in the emotional well being of the children.
Leaving no stone unturned, Teamoperu continues,"OK, lets parse this. “Self esteem was virtually non existent among the children before our arrival” and “They lived in depression, abuse and neglect and they felt worthless.” Wow. How would he know about conditions before his arrival? Non-existent self-esteem and depression and neglect? Wow. This is not the Peru I know. What arrogant statements or is it just self-serving to say this? Come to think of it, I do not know a depressed or neglected child in Peru, do you? Poor yes, neglected no. I guess they must exist, how fortunate for Mr Killon that he was able to find entire communities near Huaraz full of them."
I am well informed about Peru prior to my arrival by the reams of reports that I have read, the hundreds of onsite interviews that I conducted and the evidence that I saw all around me after my arrival. If this is not the Peru that Teamoperu says he knows, then perhaps he should lift himself from his armchair that he is quarterbacking from and take a closer look outside of the evidently comfortable and affluent residential confines that he shares his points of view from. I trust that my responses are broadening the vision of anyone who has not seen nor experienced this part of Peru and this level of unfortunate folk. My statements are neither arrogant nor self serving as he suggests but personal observation which is why we have brought in the services of a clinical psychologist who has volunteered to help the situation. I found these "entire communities full of them" as he states, because I was looking specifically for them.
And yet he further avers, "
“The children have discovered a beautiful new person they never realized lived so close to them. It was their own new selves.” Really? Come on. And but for your gringo help they would never have found that truly wonderful person inside themselves. Not.
“As we mold the thinking of the children...” Wow. I am sure the parents really appreciate your molding their children for them, after all, they have shown they cannot. Afterall, without you their kids would be neglected and depressed. Let me tell you, some of the best parents and best kids I have met live in the Andes. The stories you are telling to promote yourself and get donations is an insult to these fine parents and fine kids I know."
My response to this seemingly more agitated and aggressive tort is one of simple explanation and clarification. If not for my gringo help...? If you were sick, could you get better without a doctor? Maybe, but it is much easier with help when it avails itself isn't it? In fact, we point the way, give the children a sense of direction, encouragement and the self esteem to advance themselves. We do not and can not carry anyone, load families with handouts, as you suggested, nor cripple the children with debility. Debility is inhibiting their own stimulated development but eliminating the need to do things for themselves on their own accord.
I take particular issue with the assertion that these accounts I share are in some way for self promotion purposes and to get donations. What we have done over the last 4 years at Changes for New Hope has been for the direct development and benefit of the children living in destitution and despair. It is a work of love and compassion that will continue and needs to continue whether we reach out to these little ones with reporters and cameras making documentaries of us as we go or we advance this project in complete obscurity. Donations may or may not arrive depending on a myriad of personal convictions of individuals. That is neither our focus nor our worry. We roll with what we have and do what we can, for as many as we can, for as long as we can.
I respect and appreciate your comments and opinions regardless of how far afield they are from reality. I trust that my responses have been useful in clarifying and enlightening you and anyone else who is, at the very least, curious about how an NGO makes this piece of the world a better place and at the most, causes you to forfeit your quadriplegic track coach mentality and join us or any other project of your choosing, to make a significant difference in the lives of the less fortunate as opposed to criticizing those whose lives are dedicated to a higher calling.
Live large, live deliberately,
Jim Killon
President/founder
Changes for New Hope

Huaraz Peru

Just awesome contribution.. Such useful information.. I think we must follow the similar path and try to give back something to society.
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby Sonya M » Wed Dec 04, 2013 11:53 pm

Team0peru why such hatred towards someone you don't know? I am fortunate enough to be able to share a different point of view of Jim, I knew him when I was a child. I saw him through the eyes of an 8 year old child. I was taught by him for many years spiritually when he was a pastor in the church that we both attended. I sat in a few of his sign language classes, bible studies, Sunday school classes and prayer meetings. I feel I'm qualified to say he is an upstanding person and an awesome teacher. Maybe you should meet him and go see how things are being done before you judge so harshly. I have known Jim for more than 35 years and I can't think of anyone more qualified in teaching and helping children and or adults than he is. Maybe you should put more of your efforts into helping someone in your community or abroad, your choice. Really the time you waste to write negativity about something positive and spew out such hateful things about someone you don't know, could be spent much more positively. :roll:
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby teamoperu » Thu Dec 05, 2013 6:57 am

On the Changes for New Hope web site, click on Supporters and it shows Expat Peru as a supporter
http://www.changesfornewhope.org/supporters.html
Alan, can I ask what is the support provided?
SAE is also listed so I could also ask them, what is the support provided to this NGO by SAE?
Thanks in advance.
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby alan » Thu Dec 05, 2013 9:55 am

teamoperu wrote:On the Changes for New Hope web site, click on Supporters and it shows Expat Peru as a supporter
http://www.changesfornewhope.org/supporters.html
Alan, can I ask what is the support provided?
SAE is also listed so I could also ask them, what is the support provided to this NGO by SAE?
Thanks in advance.


Hi,

I didn´t know that ExpatPeru was listed as a supporter, but I don´t mind. It probably stems from the fact that a couple years ago we were asked to run some pictures on our home main page (back when we had a slideshow feature) that had been taken at the Changes for New Hope facilities. I have never met Jim in person, but have tried to show moral support whenever he has written me.

That said, I agree with you and think that NGO´s (incluuding Jim´s) should aspire to have boards of directors and provide financial transparency to donors - but being realistic , this is something that can take time since the founders are also dealing with the day-to-day issues of advancing their cause.

To be fair, half of this country´s economy is informal because the regulations are onerous, and the institutions that oversee them are sometimes inefficient and maybe even corrupt. Formalizing can be an added expense and a huge draw on enthusiasm, and that goes for NGO´s too.

But yes, NGO's (and companies) should make every effort to formalize; they will likely find new and better access to financing, and will become institutions with the strength to outlast their founders.
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby JimKillon » Thu Dec 05, 2013 5:34 pm

Thank you for the posts, Alan and Sonya.
Alan, I agree that every organization should develop themselves to the best of their capabilities. Changes for New Hope continues to develop with each passing year. Nothing happens instantly in Peru. We do provide information to donors, with accompanying thank you letters, how and what their specific donations are used for. Names and other information about other donors are confidential to protect the privacy of the individuals supporting us. Based on the posts above, it is obvious why exhaustive explanations and endless clarifications serve the public interests only minimally. When a question comes to us, we address it as honestly and completely as possible. Mature and well meaning individuals appreciate that and thank us. When the response is ignored and/or becomes the focus of belligerent retorts, mockery or sarcasm, the curtains are drawn and the lights get turned off and an individual, such as this, is left to seek another avenue to fulfill their amusements. As I mentioned in my original clarification, I don't attempt to convince the unconvincible.
Sonya, thank you for your input. You have been an incredible friend and supporter of this project since its earliest development. I can fully appreciate your point of view and anger at an individual who makes such ludicrous suggestions such as there are no children suffering from depression in Peru, they should be content to play with sticks and a tin can, whatever blankets that they have are sufficient, being able to see in the dark is an unnecessary luxury and should simply go to bed when the sun goes down. Such abhorrence of foreign help, such as the aid afforded to the children by our project and other NGOs, is simply ignorance. It is this ignorance that would further inhibit the Peruvian children needing our help, and freeze them in time back to 1492. Peru is still a third world country. Belligerent and unqualified torts against those who are here to help the next generation of Peruvians only serves to show how desperately our help is needed. Such attitudes only serve to keep Peru in third world conditions. As one of your American wise people once said, "Lead, follow, or get out of the way." This would be my most sincere suggestion to any individual with legitimate concerns about how an organization or group seeks to bring relief to those in desperation and despair.
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby GunvorPlatou » Sat Dec 07, 2013 12:08 pm

I can say from personal experience that Changes for New Hope and Jim Killon make a true difference in the lives of the children he helps and their families. I volunteered with the organisation a year ago and even though I was only there for a fairly short time the families in the project welcomed me with open arms. There is reason why I write "families" and not "children". As I understand some of what teamoperu has written (correct me if I'm wrong), he thinks that Jim is trying to rescue the children from their families. This is not the case in my view. Instead the families are involved in the project. During my stay with Changes for New Hope I experienced the families’ involvement many times, for example: one of the mothers helped with the preparation of the traditional hot chocolate, and in one of the groups, when we finished the day's activities with the children, the parents invited us to stay and play volleyball with them and the children.

From my experience the families involved in the project are families that want to help themselves improve and give their children a better chance. The families who just wanted to take and take and take and not do anything to help themselves are not part of the project.

Apart from involving the parents and siblings of the families, Jim is also helped a lot by a local teacher named Charlie. Charlie teaches the older children and helps with other aspects of the organisation as well. So this is not a case of "a white man coming to save the World" but a project that has been integrated into the local community. Right before I left Jim started getting help from a local Peruvian girl - so it is not only volunteers from "first world" countries that are part of the organisation.

There are of course NGOs that are corrupt and don't help the people they claim to help - but to my knowledge Changes for New Hope is certainly not one of them!

Gunvor Platou, Denmark
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby Sergio Bernales » Mon Dec 09, 2013 11:50 am

Uh, why are there so many first-time posters here? This is beginning to look like propaganda.
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby Driver8 » Mon Dec 09, 2013 2:10 pm

Sergio Bernales wrote:Uh, why are there so many first-time posters here? This is beginning to look like propaganda.



Could be some sock puppets.
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby teamoperu » Mon Dec 09, 2013 2:31 pm

Alan wrote:
teamoperu wrote:On the Changes for New Hope web site, click on Supporters and it shows Expat Peru as a supporter
http://www.changesfornewhope.org/supporters.html
Alan, can I ask what is the support provided?
SAE is also listed so I could also ask them, what is the support provided to this NGO by SAE?
Thanks in advance.


Hi,

I didn´t know that ExpatPeru was listed as a supporter, but I don´t mind. It probably stems from the fact that a couple years ago we were asked to run some pictures on our home main page (back when we had a slideshow feature) that had been taken at the Changes for New Hope facilities. I have never met Jim in person, but have tried to show moral support whenever he has written me.

That said, I agree with you and think that NGO´s (incluuding Jim´s) should aspire to have boards of directors and provide financial transparency to donors - but being realistic , this is something that can take time since the founders are also dealing with the day-to-day issues of advancing their cause.

To be fair, half of this country´s economy is informal because the regulations are onerous, and the institutions that oversee them are sometimes inefficient and maybe even corrupt. Formalizing can be an added expense and a huge draw on enthusiasm, and that goes for NGO´s too.

But yes, NGO's (and companies) should make every effort to formalize; they will likely find new and better access to financing, and will become institutions with the strength to outlast their founders.


Thanks Alan. I am surprised you didn't know you were a listed sponsor, but since you do not mind, I guess no harm, no foul. Likely SAE doesn't know it is a sponsor either.

Except maybe there is harm in the false advertising aspect. When an NGO lists reputable sponsors it give itself a cache of respectability as well. If they are not real sponsors then it seems deceptive, or at least it deceived me.

I take your point about the work needed to responsibly do the necessary paperwork in Peru, but is it not a moot point? He indicates this is already a NGO and hence the work has already been done, no?

Ya know, I am going to simple down the question. Alan, can you or anyone tell me when this NGO was given its NGO status and by what government body, and specifically what is the registration number so one can independently verify the facts?
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby teamoperu » Tue Dec 10, 2013 7:56 am

Sonya M wrote:Team0peru why such hatred towards someone you don't know? I am fortunate enough to be able to share a different point of view of Jim, I knew him when I was a child. I saw him through the eyes of an 8 year old child. I was taught by him for many years spiritually when he was a pastor in the church that we both attended. I sat in a few of his sign language classes, bible studies, Sunday school classes and prayer meetings. I feel I'm qualified to say he is an upstanding person and an awesome teacher. Maybe you should meet him and go see how things are being done before you judge so harshly. I have known Jim for more than 35 years and I can't think of anyone more qualified in teaching and helping children and or adults than he is. Maybe you should put more of your efforts into helping someone in your community or abroad, your choice. Really the time you waste to write negativity about something positive and spew out such hateful things about someone you don't know, could be spent much more positively. :roll:


Hi Sonja. I did not know he is a pastor... but that makes it worse! I suspect you meant it with respect, but it only adds to my concern. Given the child abuse at residential schools and churches, by pastors, priests and ministers, so much that the Pope has had to apologize and churches pay millions in restitution and so many pastors are now in jail, you only doubled my concern.

Sonja, look around in Baltimore and you will see the Boy Scouts, Girl Guides, youth programs, daycare centres and even churches now routinely do background and police checks on anyone working with children and vulnerable people. If it is the standard in Baltimore, it should be the standard in Peru too. Yet this NGO apparently does not do any checks, not on its leadership, not on its volunteers. It appears to be a rogue organisation with no accountability to anyone and no checks and balances in place. Just because someone says they are a teacher, it does not prove they are a qualified teacher. If we do not want past abuses repeated we cannot be complacent, we cannot assume all pastors are good because we now know they are not. Yet I ask these questions and you accuse me of hatred. We should all be asking these questions, we should all be vigilant.

Sonja, surely you are not suggesting that the children in Peru are somehow worth less and hence less worthy of the same protections as the children in Baltimore?
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby teamoperu » Tue Dec 10, 2013 10:36 am

Hi Gunvor. First, thank you for your humanitarian effort here in Peru. Much appreciated.

I have a relative in Denmark, I suppose I could confirm with him, but I will assume that in Denmark in order to teach children you need to be qualified, need to have a valid teaching certificate.

I am having difficulty actually confirming verifiable facts about the NGO Changes for New Hope. You state the Christian is on site teaching children. Can you please tell me what are his teaching credentials, what year and where did he receive his teaching certificate so I can verify?

One would not bring a medical humanitarian team to Peru without them having have current medical qualifications. Nor would one want to bring a educational humanitarian team to Peru without them having teaching credentials. If one cannot have a medical team with medical certificates, then do not come. If one cannot have a educational team with teaching qualifications, then do not come. Well, come, but do something else, something they are qualified to do. It would be hypocritical to demand qualifications in your home country and not demand the same in someone else's country. The children of Peru deserve equal protection as the children of Denmark. Just because Peru is not as developed as Denmark does not mean you can change your standards or duty of care.

Can you also confirm that volunteers that come to teach the children are checked for the appropriate qualifications?

Please come back to Peru and help in what you are qualified to do. People can say whatever they want on the internet. Do not misinterpret my probing for verifiable truth as anything but an passion for protecting Peru's children from unscrupulous NGOs, just as you would do in Denmark... just as Jim Killon as commented he has done.
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby Driver8 » Tue Dec 10, 2013 11:55 am

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Re: SAE Donations

Postby teamoperu » Tue Dec 10, 2013 2:00 pm

Driver8 wrote:http://blogs.volunteermatch.org/engagingvolunteers/2013/09/05/2-years-later-the-amazing-difference-volunteers-have-made-for-one-organization/


Oh yes, no doubt Mr Killon is an excellent salesman and marketer. A silver tongue pitch, is loose with the truth, and has multiple plays on the heartstrings. If his purpose is to publicize himself, he is quite successful! Gets the TV media out to the site, peppers the internet, arranges multiple speaking engagements, flames any doubters, prompts one-post wonders when someone asks for proof, even writes a book about himself. But hey, who writes a book about how altruistic they are anyway? – a suspicious juxtaposition. And then has the time to self-promote the book. Seems he not only has a divine calling to help delinquent kids in Peru, but a calling to make himself look good while doing so. Of course, just IMO which is coming from, what did he say I had, oh yes, “a quadriplegic track coach mentality”.
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby JimKillon » Tue Dec 10, 2013 3:05 pm

Thank you kindly Gunvor for your post in a sincere effort to clarify and support our project. Unfortunately, our ranting friend here is not prepared to be confused with any facts regardless of its authentication. Preconceived ideas are the tattoo of the ignorant for just this reason.
He is a self styled hater named Daryl who is using what people post here on ExpatPeru, for fodder on his blogsite which is loaded with sarcasm, abuse and belligerence against expats. All expats. For example, he refers to this as ExConPeru on his semi-literate blogsite. While he bemoans Alan's efforts to moderate comments so as not to be too 'over the top', our self reflective naysayer here applaudes himself for having a blog which he banters an "Anything goes" format. If he had reams of documentation proving this or any other NGO or social project is in full complicity to the Nth degree, he is not prepared to step up to lift a finger to help the people of this country. It is not his actual concern. His only focus is to attempt to vilify and slander the efforts of anyone who does. Whatever answers offered in good faith, he ignores.
Need more proof? Watch this: While Daryl is pseudo-championing the cause of transparency, let's level the playing field shall we?
Daryl AKA Teamoperu, In the interest of transparency, which you seem to want to make your theme song, let’s level the playing field. Before anyone answers any more of your presumptuous questions you need to answer a few of mine. Let’s start with a name. Daryl what? What are your credentials? What is your primary and secondary interests in asking endless questions about myself or the project? Do you have a point or counterpoint to your endless inquiries? What qualifies you, aside from idle curiosity, fluff for your own blogsite or self serving ego enrichment, to address those doing humanitarian work in Peru with such disrespect, belligerence or sarcasm after they have been polite enough to respond to your queries? And here is the one we are all just dying to hear your answer to, while you are ever eager to bedamn and "verify" the qualifications of others, what have you done to better the lives of the Peruvian people? What are your contributions and efforts to enhance the people of this country, and please verify it with appropriate documentation. Answer those questions first. If I deem the responses worthy of further dialogue, then one may continue. If you choose not to respond to these questions properly, intelligently, well, you have shared with everyone exactly what you are and exactly what your ulterior motivations are as well. We have a saying in my country, “Tracer bullets work in both directions.” Once you are out in the open, we have a level playing field. Fair enough, I’d say.
Also, this just came to my attention a few days ago. Our ever angry friend Daryl here has bashed so many expats and others who help them, that there is an actual website devoted to attacking his slander, belligerence and unending arrogance. This site is setting the record straight about this guy and exposing him for what he is. The moderator apparently is quite up to the task of exposing and calling out this terminal adolescent. Clearly, Ol' Daryl doesn't like his own medicine being funneled down his own throat, as you will see. He is exposed as a deeply disturbed person seeking any attention he can garner, even if it is hatred towards him. He is considered a leech on the flanks of any thoroughbred racing to victory. A free rider in hopes that, with the success and victories that others have earned, he could somehow gain notoriety by ill associating himself. Sort of like an internet version of Mark David Chapman. You have my pity Daryl, my deepest sympathy.
Here is the website that Daryl wishes you wouldn't see:
https://darrylisyourfriendinperu.wordpr ... endinperu/
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby ironchefchris » Tue Dec 10, 2013 4:44 pm

When it comes to people asking for money from others and then living off of that money I think it's fair to ask for accountability instead of just assuming credibility.

The person is a pastor? Potential red flag as it's a good cover for someone perpetrating a scam. It's not as if there hasn't been a history of scandals involving pastors, priests, etc.. Sex, drugs, money, fraud - sometimes all within the same scandal - oh my! It's a charity? For the children? Obviously not every charity has a history of scandal, but organizations such as this exist for a reason:

http://www.charitywatch.org/articles/Ch ... Shame.html

It would be nice if everyone who says they have good intentions actually did, but we live in cynical, scandalous, post-Watergate, times. I think it's healthy to ask these questions.

I don't know Jim Killion or his organization so I'm not making a judgment on him or his charity one way or the other; only saying that there are historical reasons to show skepticism. The easiest way to dispel any skepticism would be to provide the proof of actual NGO status asked for along with the source where people can independently verify this information for themselves.

Without official status or credentials my father was a charitable man (without asking others to provide him money so that he could be charitable) and taught me how to fish (among other things) so I believe it's possible to be charitable and/or teach without status, credentials, or public recognition. However, it does seem disingenuous to label an organization as an NGO if it has not been certified as such by any sanctioning agency. I understand time consuming hoops have to be jumped through and Peru is a land of beaurocracy which begets informality, but I don't think that is an excuse to bypass those hoops and beuracracy and self apply the formal label of NGO - or doctor, or lawyer, or professor, etc.. Even though Alan granted his blessing ("I didn´t know that ExpatPeru was listed as a supporter, but I don´t mind.") after Mr. Killion listed expatperu as a sponsor, it still raises a red flag with me. Are other sponsors also listed without their knowledge? How are we to know? If this NGO (?) plays loose with endorsements, what else are they playing loose with? Perhaps nothing and everything is all above board and legit, but it does raise legitimate questions that should be answered. Helping people without official or public recognition can be considered noble, while using the unearned title of NGO to help solicit funds and sell books seems a bit dodgy - even if a portion of those funds do go to help children. Once again, proof of actual NGO status is the easiest way to prove legitimacy in the face of healthy skepticism (not hatred, as some have suggested). I sincerely hope you come through instead of contributing another reason for skepticism when it comes to NGO's and charity.
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby ironchefchris » Tue Dec 10, 2013 5:14 pm

Jim,

I'm surprised that hateful guys site is still around. Last I checked back in July or so, you had to be a member or sign up in order to access his site. Didn't seem worth it for the few bizarre laughs provided. Just went over for a quick glance and see that he's slamming you and apparently me as well, for whatever reason, in the same blog post. Apparently, he has a habit of responding to/commenting on his own posts using different names, thus talking to himself. Strange.

I think you might be off on thinking this guy and teamoperu are one in the same person, though. From what I remember reading in this guys blog, teamoperu seems to be one of his many targets from expatperu as well as others at another website, and now you. teamoperu has even brought to the attention of other expats posters at expatperu who are most likely this Darryl person you mention, trolling on this site. I believe that teamoperu is based in Northern Peru while a little further investigation (He's become quite the topic of conversation over the last few months, I see) leads me to believe the hateful guy is based out of Lima. Having met neither of them personally, I guess there's a very rare chance this Darryl is schizophrenic to the point where he has multiple personalities that exchange unkind words about each other/himself - but I doubt it. I wouldn't be surprised if teamoperu corrects this speculation himself, but I don't believe it's him and don't think you should confuse skepticism with this other guys hatred/psychosis/boredom/whatever his problem is. Of course the best way to deal with healthy skepticism is to provide the information the skeptic asks for that would prove the legitimacy and official status that allows your charity to call itself an NGO.
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby Sergio Bernales » Tue Dec 10, 2013 7:08 pm

JimKillon wrote:Thank you kindly Gunvor for your post in a sincere effort to clarify and support our project. Unfortunately, our ranting friend here is not prepared to be confused with any facts regardless of its authentication. Preconceived ideas are the tattoo of the ignorant for just this reason.
He is a self styled hater named Daryl who is using what people post here on ExpatPeru, for fodder on his blogsite which is loaded with sarcasm, abuse and belligerence against expats. All expats. For example, he refers to this as ExConPeru on his semi-literate blogsite. While he bemoans Alan's efforts to moderate comments so as not to be too 'over the top', our self reflective naysayer here applaudes himself for having a blog which he banters an "Anything goes" format. If he had reams of documentation proving this or any other NGO or social project is in full complicity to the Nth degree, he is not prepared to step up to lift a finger to help the people of this country. It is not his actual concern. His only focus is to attempt to vilify and slander the efforts of anyone who does. Whatever answers offered in good faith, he ignores.
Need more proof? Watch this: While Daryl is pseudo-championing the cause of transparency, let's level the playing field shall we?
Daryl AKA Teamoperu, In the interest of transparency, which you seem to want to make your theme song, let’s level the playing field. Before anyone answers any more of your presumptuous questions you need to answer a few of mine. Let’s start with a name. Daryl what? What are your credentials? What is your primary and secondary interests in asking endless questions about myself or the project? Do you have a point or counterpoint to your endless inquiries? What qualifies you, aside from idle curiosity, fluff for your own blogsite or self serving ego enrichment, to address those doing humanitarian work in Peru with such disrespect, belligerence or sarcasm after they have been polite enough to respond to your queries? And here is the one we are all just dying to hear your answer to, while you are ever eager to bedamn and "verify" the qualifications of others, what have you done to better the lives of the Peruvian people? What are your contributions and efforts to enhance the people of this country, and please verify it with appropriate documentation. Answer those questions first. If I deem the responses worthy of further dialogue, then one may continue. If you choose not to respond to these questions properly, intelligently, well, you have shared with everyone exactly what you are and exactly what your ulterior motivations are as well. We have a saying in my country, “Tracer bullets work in both directions.” Once you are out in the open, we have a level playing field. Fair enough, I’d say.
Also, this just came to my attention a few days ago. Our ever angry friend Daryl here has bashed so many expats and others who help them, that there is an actual website devoted to attacking his slander, belligerence and unending arrogance. This site is setting the record straight about this guy and exposing him for what he is. The moderator apparently is quite up to the task of exposing and calling out this terminal adolescent. Clearly, Ol' Daryl doesn't like his own medicine being funneled down his own throat, as you will see. He is exposed as a deeply disturbed person seeking any attention he can garner, even if it is hatred towards him. He is considered a leech on the flanks of any thoroughbred racing to victory. A free rider in hopes that, with the success and victories that others have earned, he could somehow gain notoriety by ill associating himself. Sort of like an internet version of Mark David Chapman. You have my pity Daryl, my deepest sympathy.
Here is the website that Daryl wishes you wouldn't see:
https://darrylisyourfriendinperu.wordpr ... endinperu/


I think Chris is right. I doubt very much Teamoperu and Daryl are one and the same, unless he's gone a bit Norman Bates and started writing criticisms of himself while dressed up as his dead mother. Plenty of comments about Teamoperu on his website, along with some about me and a few others.

Thanks for thinking of me, Daryl, but you need to get your facts straight. I'm not from the "Greatest Nation on Earth". Have a lovely day, Daryl, and write some more about me. It's very sweet of you. .
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby teamoperu » Tue Dec 10, 2013 9:19 pm

Well, I am who I am, and apparently not who you think I am. I could tell you that I am a professional, I have been involved in volunteerism in Peru for probably 5 times as long as you. I could say too long now that I have become cynical, but long enough that I have seen people like you come and go and had to mop up afterwards. I could tell you about the many missionaries on international flights trying to impress me on how they are helping the poor in Peru, while we sip pisco sours in Business Class. I could tell you that, but I will not because, no matter how hard you try, I am not the subject of this thread.

Yes, ironchefchris, most of the time in Northern Peru, but with visits to Lima and much of Peru. Here, I have a friend looking for any official records about this NGO, but nothing has come up yet. But that is not definitive yet because, as you know, searching government records here can be difficult, especially expanding searches when nothing shows up. What I do find interesting is when I scratch the surface a bit, what vitriol oozes out, from a man of the cloth yet. I wonder why?
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby teamoperu » Wed Dec 11, 2013 9:47 am

Yessy was sitting on the stoop when Jim Killon arrived, news media in tow, cameras, flashes. Alone, her parents were working the finca in the sierras today. A shy little girl, so she only watched as people ran in excitement to kiss and hug him, welcomes and smiles all around, as he returned to the village once again. The cameras bright as Senor Jim dramatically opened the suitcases and benevolently graced the most aggressive with gifts and trinkets. He had to do it twice because the cameraman missed the first shot. She was excited too. She wore used hand-me-down clothes. Maybe this time Senor Jim would favour her, maybe he would pull a new dress out of the wondrous things from North America, a nice colourful dress, just her size, small. Maybe even he would wink at her, give her a kiss, a kind word, just like he does with the bigger girls. He is so tall, and rich, and generous, with celestial eyes. She was excited, but also a little scared. Last time Senor Jim arrived with a mountain of stuffed toys for many, but not for her, she was passed over. Maybe this time. But no, Senor Jim was too busy smiling and receiving accolades as the translator tried to give him the words for the interview, for the handshake with the mayor, for the photo op with the boy with the worn out shoes.

(Inspired by actual photos and videos)
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby Sergio Bernales » Wed Dec 11, 2013 12:37 pm

teamoperu wrote:Yessy was sitting on the stoop when Jim Killon arrived, news media in tow, cameras, flashes. Alone, her parents were working the finca in the sierras today. A shy little girl, so she only watched as people ran in excitement to kiss and hug him, welcomes and smiles all around, as he returned to the village once again. The cameras bright as Senor Jim dramatically opened the suitcases and benevolently graced the most aggressive with gifts and trinkets. He had to do it twice because the cameraman missed the first shot. She was excited too. She wore used hand-me-down clothes. Maybe this time Senor Jim would favour her, maybe he would pull a new dress out of the wondrous things from North America, a nice colourful dress, just her size, small. Maybe even he would wink at her, give her a kiss, a kind word, just like he does with the bigger girls. He is so tall, and rich, and generous, with celestial eyes. She was excited, but also a little scared. Last time Senor Jim arrived with a mountain of stuffed toys for many, but not for her, she was passed over. Maybe this time. But no, Senor Jim was too busy smiling and receiving accolades as the translator tried to give him the words for the interview, for the handshake with the mayor, for the photo op with the boy with the worn out shoes.

(Inspired by actual photos and videos)


Elmer Gantry springs to mind.
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby ironchefchris » Wed Dec 11, 2013 4:05 pm

I hope I'm wrong on this, but I'm starting to think we'll never see proof of NGO status because it's so simple to provide that if it exists we would have seen it by now. When you're legit and asked to provide proof of such you gladly provide it with a smile on your face instead of changing the subject and expressing outrage that anyone would even dare question your credibility; as if "It's for the children!" should suffice. There's no better way to deal with a skeptic than to happily give them what they ask for, whether you're a surgeon asked to provide credentials or you're an NGO asked to provide proof that you are indeed such and not just using the title.

I went to Guidestar.org, (http://www.guidestar.org/rxg/about-us/index.aspx) whose mission is:

"To revolutionize philanthropy by providing information that advances transparency, enables users to make better decisions, and encourages charitable giving.

I easily found information for my friends 501c3 charity (Edens Rose Foundation) that operates in Ecuador and Tibet and how they've filed the proper forms with the IRS. Nothing at all listed for Changes for New Hope. I would think that if a charity founded and run by a couple of hippies that operates in remote and rural parts of Ecuador and Tibet can jump through the necessary hoops and deal with beaurocracy to be legit, so can anyone. Perhaps there's another independent organization we can look to that is able to certify the NGO status of Changes for New Hope? Can Mr. Killion offer a suggestion? I hope so.
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby teamoperu » Thu Dec 12, 2013 9:45 am

Well, limaclub, I suggest its time to step up to the plate. :) You started the thread, you know him personally, you hosted his presentation, you appealed for donations (vitamins) for his cause.

SAE has a well deserved positive reputation. Because you are based in Peru, people internationally rely on you to provide correct information and for SAE to be associated only with legitimate and culturally sensitive projects. Heck, I remember the good ole days (25 years ago?) when SAE volunteers cleaned the Inca Trail during down season and, if I remember correctly, a shaman performed a cleaning ceremony beforehand. I remember that projects were being run by professionals associated with local partners to conscientiously ensure they were befitting.

If you did not before, could I respectfully ask you now to confirm the NGO Changes for Good Hope is a legitimate not-for-profit that has the appropriate permissions to operate in Peru? Could I ask also that you confirm SAE is a sponsor, as listed on its Sponsors page, and indicate what exactly this sponsorship entails – money, free housing? Or only limited to hosting his publicity and soliciting donations for him? Thanks in advance.
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby limaclub » Thu Dec 12, 2013 3:54 pm

Hi Teamoperu
Sorry i hadn`t really followed this thread since i last messaged you and was just recently informed of the discussion that has been taking place.

I only recent became manager of the Lima clubhouse and i`m still on a small bit of a learning curve when it comes to certain parts of the office work as the long process of moving the clubhouse to it`s new location on 956 Enrique Palacios has taken up much of my working time and still does as we are not fully settled into the new clubhouse. I will answer your questions as best as possible but there will be some answers that i will need to find out and it may take a bit as there is more than enough work for me to do currently at the office.

I would like to correct the following wrong statements however.
I do not know Jim Personally, i have organised the presentation at the clubhouse and met Jim on the day.

On Changes for new hopes page it says we support His organisation. It does not say we Sponsor his organisation. If i`ve missed that could you please copy me the link to the page as i cannot find it on this page anywhere http://www.changesfornewhope.org/supporters.html

On his page if you hover the mouse over the SAE logo it mentions how we have helped with donations, other materials,recommended volunteers and given sound advice. SAE always accepts donations and we try to pass these on to people or organisations who need them as donations will slowly mount up in the office. People will regularly leave items like clothing, books, trekking equipment etc especially if they are returning home after living in Peru.

Volunteer and non profit organisations can have their details left in the volunteer section of the office. The organisation will need to fill out a register form for SAE. I have only been here a short time and this is one of the processes i have not had to deal with yet so i will need to get back with details about this. There is trip reports for volunteer organisatons where people can rate and comment about their experiences with an organisations service. This helps provide future volunteers information about the company they wish to work with. Obviously SAE will act appropriately if there is negative feed back for an organisation.

SAE gives support to these organisations by giving them space in the volunteer library, inform members in news letters about presentations taking place at the clubhouse as well as the actual presentation to help promote their organisation and donations if there are any to give at the clubhouse. SAE in no way gives financial help or sponsors any organisation.

I hope this helps with any concerns. I would suggest if you want to check a organisations legal status you should go to Sunat to find the information.


Saludos

South American Explorers
956 Enrique Palacios
Miraflores
Lima
Tel: 447 7731
saexplorers.org
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby teamoperu » Thu Dec 12, 2013 9:08 pm

Thanks for the reply limaclub, especially when you are so busy. Yes, quite right “supporter” not “sponsor”. On the Spanish page “quienes nos apoyan”. I understand the distinction you are necessarily making. Not sure the casual reader of the web page would make such a fine distinction. I know, mea culpa, I did not. I couldn't make that hover mouse thing work so good thing you listed what it says for me, thanks.

I now understand SAE doesn't sponsor Changes for New Hope, but does support it.

FYI, I have had someone try to search government records, without success. Was thinking since SAE is shown as supporting this “NGO” you might have had some documentation of its registration on file. Mr Killon seems not to want to provide it for some unknown reason. Maybe when you get a moment you can transcribe his NGO registration number from the file you mentioned?

:D You should be proud SAE gets top billing over even ExpatPeru and Air Canada, who waives baggage fees, but not the White Feather Foundation, who apparently gave real money, not sure whether that makes them supporters or sponsors or both. Come to think of it, I'll write to them to see if they have any documentation they could provide to us proving Changes for Good Hope is a bone fide not-for-profit. Should be easy. I have to communicate with Calin Rovinescu, President of Air Canada, on a different matter anyway and White Feather has a Twitter feed.

I am coming down to Lima next week, Christmas shopping jeje. If I can find time I'll pop over to your new club house to say Ola!
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby teamoperu » Fri Dec 13, 2013 7:41 am

I'll stick with this thread for commenting about donations (I have a ton of observations after years of it) because it is titled Donations and, instead of being theoretical, I can use Mr Killon's errors as real time illustrations.

For example, Mr Killon makes a big deal on his web site about supplying a few space age thermal blankets. He took some to Huaraz and had the obligatory photo ops, with the explanation the kids are cold at night. OK, lets think. What statement is that making? That things from north America are better than Peruvian? Or, look how the great white hope can arrive with wondrous things that their parents never supplied them? And who decides who gets them, unless he brings enough for all? So we create haves and haves not. Maybe even the kids who needed them most did not get them. We also create not an envy... whats the word, a wishing, just another “I wish I could have but can't” moment to remind them of their poverty... maybe I am not explaining that well.

What is the solution for keeping kids warm? Well, do we really need to find a high tech solution? What is wrong with the traditional solution? Mr Killon poked fun at me for suggesting using Andean blankets. They have been perfected for the climate over decades. Give the kid a quality blankie or two, that will do the trick. Do we really need to import space age blankets when we could support something made locally. Buy some local blankets, made by local artisans, and at the same time support the local economy and even bow a little to Peruvian traditions. Do we really need to arrive stating we have a better flashy solution because it makes us feel superior, we can feel smug seeing the wow factor? What is wrong with supporting the local economy? what's wrong with supporting a handicraft tradition of beautiful blankets, and the associated supply chain, rather than replace them with those shiny paper thin contraptions. There is good effort going on in Peru to help develop micro-industry to relieve poverty, handicrafts for export, why the heck wouldn't we support these micro-economies by buying blankets locally? And for heaven's sake don't stand in the plaza and hand out willy-nilly, but that is another post.

(yes, I know those emergency blankets can be invaluable in the right circumstances and can be bought here cheap at Mesa Rodunda, I'm just making a point).
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby teamoperu » Sun Dec 15, 2013 8:55 am

GunvorPlatou wrote:I can say from personal experience that Changes for New Hope and Jim Killon make a true difference in the lives of the children he helps and their families. I volunteered with the organisation a year ago and even though I was only there for a fairly short time the families in the project welcomed me with open arms. There is reason why I write "families" and not "children". As I understand some of what teamoperu has written (correct me if I'm wrong), he thinks that Jim is trying to rescue the children from their families. This is not the case in my view. Instead the families are involved in the project. During my stay with Changes for New Hope I experienced the families’ involvement many times, for example: one of the mothers helped with the preparation of the traditional hot chocolate, and in one of the groups, when we finished the day's activities with the children, the parents invited us to stay and play volleyball with them and the children.

From my experience the families involved in the project are families that want to help themselves improve and give their children a better chance. The families who just wanted to take and take and take and not do anything to help themselves are not part of the project.

Apart from involving the parents and siblings of the families, Jim is also helped a lot by a local teacher named Charlie. Charlie teaches the older children and helps with other aspects of the organisation as well. So this is not a case of "a white man coming to save the World" but a project that has been integrated into the local community. Right before I left Jim started getting help from a local Peruvian girl - so it is not only volunteers from "first world" countries that are part of the organisation.

There are of course NGOs that are corrupt and don't help the people they claim to help - but to my knowledge Changes for New Hope is certainly not one of them!

Gunvor Platou, Denmark


Hello again, gunvor. It is becoming increasingly evident that you have been duped because the man refuses or cannot provide proof the “NGO” is a legitimate not-for-profit organization. The good news is you had a chance to see the reality in the beautiful Andes and help some nice kids with their homework. The bad news is that since it is not an NGO it does not have any independent auditing so it is possible your money went to pay for his Business class seats on his international flights.

Your story differs from his. He states the kids live in “destitution” and are “trained little thieves, liars and con artists” were “self esteem was virtually non existent among the children before our arrival. They lived in depression, abuse and neglect and they felt worthless” but miraculously in a few short years he has taught them “how to become fine young men and women as they grow up” because he “molds the thinking of the children” that he “manages”. Your post seems to indicate that the families are involved, with loving mothers. You do not mention abuse and neglect and thievery. Indeed, you say families with poor values that just want “to take and take and take and not do anything to help themselves are not part of the project”. I tend to believe you over him.
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby tomsax » Sun Dec 15, 2013 6:01 pm

teamoperu wrote:The bad news is that since it is not an NGO it does not have any independent auditing so it is possible your money went to pay for his Business class seats on his international flights.



My experience is that registered NGOs in Peru have very little auditing at all. This makes giving to local charities difficult but the best thing is to meet the people concerned and just make a personal judgement on people's honesty, integrity and motivation. The talk mentioned at the beginning of this thread would have been a great chance to meet the people concerned and make that sort of judgement. I commend SAE for giving space for that to happen.

Personally I wouldn't be that bothered if a local NGO was registered or not. Being registered just causes a hole lot of more costs diverting resources from people who really need it.
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby teamoperu » Mon Dec 16, 2013 8:32 am

Yup, tomsax. And how would you feel about an organization like this one that promotes itself as a NGO, but when challenged flames the questioner, calls on a few sock puppets, and fails to clarify the situation?
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby ironchefchris » Mon Dec 16, 2013 5:49 pm

tomsax wrote:
teamoperu wrote:The bad news is that since it is not an NGO it does not have any independent auditing so it is possible your money went to pay for his Business class seats on his international flights.



My experience is that registered NGOs in Peru have very little auditing at all. This makes giving to local charities difficult but the best thing is to meet the people concerned and just make a personal judgement on people's honesty, integrity and motivation. The talk mentioned at the beginning of this thread would have been a great chance to meet the people concerned and make that sort of judgement. I commend SAE for giving space for that to happen.

Personally I wouldn't be that bothered if a local NGO was registered or not. Being registered just causes a hole lot of more costs diverting resources from people who really need it.


You can do just as much good whether you're registered or not. But why call yourself an NGO if you're not? I'm not an expert, but isn't one of the requirements to being an NGO having to be registered? It's like calling yourself a Certified Public Accountant without actual certification. Doesn't mean you can't count or help someone with their books or taxes, but you also can't legitimately call yourself a C.P.A.. Assuming that Changes for New Hope is not an NGO (or else we would have seen proof by now) why doesn't Mr. Killion (who hasn't been heard from around here lately, though perhaps he's busy) just refer to it as a charity instead of intentionally deceiving by using the title of NGO? Again, I'm no expert, but aren't most NGO's registered abroad where accounting and auditing are more the norm? I agree, it's a process that takes funds away from the intended recipients, but without certification and groups such as Guidestar, there would be much more fraud than currently exists with charitable organizations. It's often difficult to make a personal judgement on people's honesty, integrity and motivation. Not all scammers are oily and obvious; the best are so smooth that if ever discovered people can't believe they fell for it. Con-men are very good at gaining your confidence.
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby ironchefchris » Mon Dec 16, 2013 6:14 pm

JimKillon wrote:Such abhorrence of foreign help, such as the aid afforded to the children by our project and other NGOs, is simply ignorance. It is this ignorance that would further inhibit the Peruvian children needing our help, and freeze them in time back to 1492. Peru is still a third world country. Belligerent and unqualified torts against those who are here to help the next generation of Peruvians only serves to show how desperately our help is needed. Such attitudes only serve to keep Peru in third world conditions.


I was a little put off by that statement; as if the year 1492 is a line of demarcation in which everything before it was much worse and civilization only really started after Europeans "discovered" existing civilizations. I was also curious as to why he didn't use the date 1532; the year Pizarro defeated and captured Inca Emperor Atahualpa as opposed to 1492 when Columbus set foot on Hispaniola. I have more respect for secular charities staffed by people who have a desire to help, possibly because they realize how lucky they have been in the 'genetic lottery' of life to have been born in a more prosperous nation and wish to give back. I've always had something of a dislike for missions whose job has historically been to tame heathens for the crown, making it easier to extract the natural resources; convert the locals so as to 'save souls,' assured that their beliefs are correct and those of who they want to help are misguided solely for the reason that they are different. As if having the good fortune to be born into a more prosperous culture makes the beliefs they most likely inherited from their ancestors right because they have more money. I guess if you have nothing you don't really care about the givers motivation. You take the blanket, ignore the mumbo-jumbo, and hope the blankets don't carry disease as they did back in 1492.
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby teamoperu » Tue Dec 17, 2013 7:46 am

Glad others think that 1492 comment was a bit off. Had other things I wanted to comment about, so it was a distraction. Glad you said something. And you said it well.
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby teamoperu » Wed Dec 18, 2013 6:25 am

Donating in Peru. I have opinions. :shock: Do the prep work. If you are going to do it, do it right. If you cannot do it right, wait until you can, it is not a race. Do not show up with suitcases full of used and dollar store goodies and distribute odds and ends you've collected randomly, that is so wrong on so many levels. It got so bad in Cuba that some communities have banned the practice. For one, you should be invited to the community, not show up to impose your generosity. Do a needs assessment. Respond to priorities. Work with the community, that requires work ahead of time.

Using Mr Jim Killon's so-called NGO as illustration. He states he has taken tons of goodies to Huaraz, even has an Air Canada waiver for excess baggage. To get the personal satisfaction he majestically and dramatically opens the suitcases outside, surrounded by cute kids, as he randomly passes out the goodies, photo ops obligatory. There are video/photos on his web site showing it. I have seen it repeated over and over again, here and elsewhere. Even people throwing candies and goodies out the window to kids as the gringo bus drives by. So wrong, so disgusting to see.

Mr Jim Killon makes the big pitch about distributing wind up lanterns. Big wow factor, look how I can brings things you didn't even know existed. His storyline is a couple of kids keep winding up their personal lantern so they can do their homework and hence get better grades and hence become fine young adults. Well, a nice storyline, but a bit of a stretch. I was aware a solid school meals program can have good results, I was unaware wind up lanterns were equally successful. He makes it sound like they would be in the pitch black without his largesse. But it is not that Peruvians haven't thought of this problem for centuries, give them some credit! I have friends who grew up doing their homework by the light of the mechón and they somehow turned into fine young adults. But really, the kerosene mechóns and wind ups are not that good. These lanterns can be useful in a community without power when your cow is calving in the middle of the night, but if you are going to something do it right, not half-as**d, work to a true solution. Electricity. Electonorte Peru is trying to get traditional power to these small communities, so help by helping them do it just a wee bit faster.

But an exciting option now is solar. Solar panel technology has improved so it is now cheap and efficient at producing power, batteries are now way better to store it, and LED lights hardly consume anything. Power can now be provided for lights (even refrigeration) even in the remotest communities. We've tested it for single fincas and community centres and it works even during the rainy season. Of course, it takes a level of planning, organization, community involvement that seems beyond Mr Killon's ad hoc visits but, in my opinion, if you are going to do something do it right. The community can have consistent power, my friends' little brothers and sisters can now put aside their mechóns... to do their homework to get better grades to become fine young adults. Haha

Does everything have to be done on a grand scale, can't just one individual do something small to make a difference? Of course, but actually quite hard to do right, that is subject of another post.
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby tomsax » Wed Dec 18, 2013 9:37 am

Given the advances in windup torches over the last years I think they are a great idea for poor isolated communities in Peru. There are many areas of Peru where the grid is not going to reach for many years. We are talking of many thousands of dollars just to reach each remote house,probably much more - it just isn't going to happen soon! Solar power is also a good idea but much more expensivea and there is the issue of theft. Why not both!

It may well be that there are far better donations to be made to other organisations in Peru. Perhaps you could give us some suggestions. It would help if you were a bit more positive, otherwise it just looks like sour grapes regarding Mr whoever it is.
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby teamoperu » Wed Dec 18, 2013 1:13 pm

Yup, tomsax, both options, nothing mutually exclusive. Solar lantern technology is pretty good too. Wind, like ironchefchris mentions. But, really, consider all available options, each having advantages based on analysis of the needs of each specific situation (rather than ad hoc).

Another nice thing going on – fog catchers. I actually met this Canadian years ago in the organization's early years. Provided him what professional advice could at the time. He did a ton of prep work with each community beforehand so it became “their” project. Some projects were totally paid for and constructed by the local community.

Note it presents as a legitimate charitable organization and clearly provides registration number.

http://www.fogquest.org/

Read the “about fogquest” page and compare openness and transparency with whats' his name.

Sadly, it seems some of these organizations have a shelf life, even the good ones, so another consideration.

(BTW, not sour grapes, for me its just an easy available practical example illustrative of what not to do, so more tangible to explain to people than theoretical).
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby tomsax » Sat Dec 21, 2013 4:15 pm

That was pretty positive I have to admit.

I think the aid industry is full og egos and in my experience with quite a lot of dodgy characters. But some good come out of the most unlikely sources. I am philosophical about the nature of aid. There are lots of mediocre projects. Not many reaaly good ones but they do exist. I think people exagerate the number that do real harm.
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Re: SAE Donations

Postby chi chi » Sat Dec 21, 2013 10:41 pm

There are some individuals that move to a third world country and go there to help people. I once met a Belgian who started a shelter in Bolivia for orphanages that were living on the streets.

But I think that the big charities are just like any other big company. The have overpaid managers who make 7 figure salaries, drive in a Mercedes Benz company cars and fly business class around the world to have a look at their projects.
I recently had a look on the internet at those charities that are looking for volunteers and was chocked on how much money they asked to be a volunteer.

I am sceptical too about charities. For sure there are a few that make a difference but it's not a lot they can do.
Also a lot of the money that gets donated ends up in the wrong hands.
Just have a look at Africa. How many billions have been donated so far and how many volunteering work has been done there. But they are still at square one. Food and medicines gets donated to African nations but a lot ends up on the black market controlled by the government.

A lot can be done in third world countries if they had a government that does help it citizens. But in most third world countries, the government spends most of it's budget on guns, bombs and other military expenses.

At the end, the only secure way to help people in third world countries is to grant them asylum in a first world country.

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