Live in Perú, work in EE UU

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RyanJ2912
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Live in Perú, work in EE UU

Postby RyanJ2912 » Tue Dec 24, 2013 3:18 pm

I work for a U.S. company online and want to move and live in Peru permanently. What are some road blocks I may run into with: immigration, taxes, ect...? :?:


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chi chi
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Re: Live in Perú, work in EE UU

Postby chi chi » Wed Jan 01, 2014 11:13 am

Have you ever been to Peru before? Or did ever live abroad?

Before packing all your stuff and move here permanently, I suggest that you spend a few weeks here sampling life in Peru.

Is your income steady and your job secure? Peru is a nice country to live, as long as you have an income that can pay all your bills and you are in good health. There's no wellfare or state handouts here if things go bad for you.

It's not easy to get a CE (permanent residence permit). You must either invest $30000 and employ at least 4 Peruvians, get a pension from your home country, get employed by a company that's willing to sponsor your work visa or get married to a Peruvian which is the easiest way to get your permanent residence. 8)

The easiest way is to live here on tourist visa. Immigration gives you up to 183 days at a time. After 183 days, you do a borderhop and come back. If you don't borderhop, then you have to pay a $1 fine for every day that you have overstayed. After you paid the fine, you can come back into the country next time around.

Be aware that prices in Peru aren't that cheap like they were used to be. Prices have increased a lot in the last few years. Even so that many products in Peru are far more expensive than in the US.
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RyanJ2912
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Re: Live in Perú, work in EE UU

Postby RyanJ2912 » Wed Jan 01, 2014 4:53 pm

I was a missionary for 10 months in Pisco and Chorrillos. I have a lot of friends there. If I went border hopping to Ecuador, would I need to get a stamp from them in order to return to Peru with proof that I left and came back? Or do I just go through the Peru immigration office at the border?
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chi chi
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Re: Live in Perú, work in EE UU

Postby chi chi » Wed Jan 01, 2014 8:04 pm

RyanJ2912 wrote:I was a missionary for 10 months in Pisco and Chorrillos. I have a lot of friends there. If I went border hopping to Ecuador, would I need to get a stamp from them in order to return to Peru with proof that I left and came back? Or do I just go through the Peru immigration office at the border?


The Peruvian-Ecuadorian border is know as the worst border crossing in Latin America. Corrupt and dishonest immigration officials that often might give you less tan 183 days and often the deny gringos entering back into Peru. And this border is also full of people that want to rob or scam you.

It's safer to buy a cheap ticket and fly in and out Lima. Most chance to get a 183 days stamp there.
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Re: Live in Perú, work in EE UU - Peru Ecuador border crossing

Postby ardilla » Fri Jan 03, 2014 2:33 pm

Chi Chi, I think you are referring to the Peru-Ecuador border crossing at Aguas Verdes, right? I agree, no fun. But you no longer have to cross at Aguas Verdes. And the new option is amazing!

There is a new Centro Binacional de Atencion Fronteriza (actually two of them, one on each side of the border of each country). I've crossed easily and with safety and speed, back and forth here, as have members of my family, en route from Guayaquil to Tumbes. It is open 24 hours all year. The setup is great: Peru and Ecuador have set up the binational border crossing so that all of your migratory document checking is done in one building, for both countries. The immigration officials from Peru and Ecuador sit right next to one another in the immigration building. You finish your "check out" of Peru with one person and then go right next to that person to "check in' to the other country.

This is the nicest border crossing I have experienced in all of my travels. There are restrooms, a restaurant, a place to walk around, and even a Peru tourism representative available at times.

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