Chef School

This is the place for ON or Off topic conversations. Almost anything goes - but be kind, and no trolling.
Forum rules
While the rules in this forum are more relaxed than in other parts of the Expat site, there are still a few things we’d like you to remember: No name calling, no insults – be civil to each other!
User avatar
captcosmic
Gold Member
Gold Member
Posts: 448
Joined: Mon Sep 23, 2013 1:52 pm

Chef School

Postby captcosmic » Thu Jan 23, 2014 9:03 am

Has anyone out there been to a chef's school in Lima? Specifically for Peruvian cuisine. Thanks!!


User avatar
alan
Gold Member
Gold Member
Posts: 3062
Joined: Tue Sep 27, 2005 5:10 pm
Contact:

Re: Chef School

Postby alan » Thu Jan 23, 2014 9:16 am

While I have never studied here, I've eaten in their restaurant (run by the students, but chef supervised). It is the best known chef school (and reviewing their web page now, I see they are now a "university") and I suspect the most expensive.

El Cordon Bleu: http://www.ulcb.edu.pe/ I believe it is something like a franchise of the orginal in France.
User avatar
captcosmic
Gold Member
Gold Member
Posts: 448
Joined: Mon Sep 23, 2013 1:52 pm

Re: Chef School

Postby captcosmic » Thu Jan 23, 2014 9:34 am

Alan,

Yes I saw them. But do they specialize in Peruvian food or mainly French? I saw they were affiliated with the French school of the same name. They run about 300 bucks per month for tuition! Thanks!
BradClark
Member
Member
Posts: 5
Joined: Tue Jan 14, 2014 9:43 am

Re: Chef School

Postby BradClark » Mon Jan 27, 2014 2:28 am

Interesting stuff. Next time I'm up in that neck of the region I will take my wife along to have a look. She is always interested in learning cooking and things like that.
User avatar
tupacperu
Gold Member
Gold Member
Posts: 3350
Joined: Sun Sep 10, 2006 10:36 am
Location: Pimentel Beach-Chiclayo- Sanford NC
Contact:

Re: Chef School

Postby tupacperu » Thu Jan 30, 2014 12:34 pm

BradClark wrote:Interesting stuff. Next time I'm up in that neck of the region I will take my wife along to have a look. She is always interested in learning cooking and things like that.



Top school in Lima.. Cordon Bleu (Miraflores), but the curriculum is more geared toward owning a restaurant and about 10% hands on cooking.

http://www.dgallia.edu.pe/ = is more hands on.
panman
Gold Member
Gold Member
Posts: 900
Joined: Mon Oct 29, 2012 12:05 pm

Re: Chef School

Postby panman » Thu Jan 30, 2014 7:15 pm

tupacperu wrote:
BradClark wrote:Interesting stuff. Next time I'm up in that neck of the region I will take my wife along to have a look. She is always interested in learning cooking and things like that.



Top school in Lima.. Cordon Bleu (Miraflores), but the curriculum is more geared toward owning a restaurant and about 10% hands on cooking.

http://www.dgallia.edu.pe/ = is more hands on.

Sounds like the correct methodology to me.
Has anyone ever been to one of Gastons restaurants and seen him on the premises, let alone in the kitchen. I haven't :lol:
User avatar
calygirl
Gold Member
Gold Member
Posts: 350
Joined: Wed Jan 30, 2008 11:55 am

Re: Chef School

Postby calygirl » Thu Jan 30, 2014 7:32 pm

sorry, don't know too much about the school, but I've been going to the restaurant since 2009 when it was still actually located in the school. Had some fantastic meals there over the years, but we went this week and very disappointed. It took them over 15 minutes to serve drinks, only one other table with diners. Then, they got one of the drink orders incorrect. They left out one of our appetizers. There were 3 of us, and two had to send their meals back. One dish (pecado sudado) had very little flavor) and the other dish (risotto) the rice wasn't cooked all the way. The best part of the meal were the desserts. It seems since they are now a real restaurant (Wallqa), the quality of the food has gone down. Too bad. Also, wasn't cheap, 200 soles for three drinks, one glass of wine, one appetizer, three main courses, and two desserts. Won't be back anytime soon.
User avatar
edgeclinger
Gold Member
Gold Member
Posts: 280
Joined: Mon Nov 09, 2009 5:26 pm
Location: Magdalena del Mar
Contact:

Re: Chef School

Postby edgeclinger » Mon Feb 24, 2014 4:19 pm

So sorry to hear that about Wallqa. I've only been there once (over a year ago) and it was fabulous. Kept meaning to go again, but after your review I may not bother. Seems to happen all the time though. Find a great place and then it goes downhill.
Loving Living in Lima
User avatar
chi chi
Gold Member
Gold Member
Posts: 6060
Joined: Tue Dec 06, 2011 5:28 pm
Location: Granada, Andalusia

Re: Chef School

Postby chi chi » Tue Feb 25, 2014 12:22 am

I studied for chef as well at one of the best chef schools in the world.

I can tell you that studying at a chef school is a waste of money and time. What you study at school can't be compared to working in a restaurant.

When at school, at weekends I worked at restaurants. I learned more at one weekend then in a full month at school.

On top of that, every restaurant uses it own récipes and working practises so after graduating from school you have to learn everything again.

At chef school, you don't learn the real world of cooking. Chef schools show that working as a chef is a great job, a dream job. But it isn't at all. It's a very stressfull job and you have to work the worst possible working hours. And the pay is marginal. It's tough to make more than the mínimum wage and overtime often doesn't get paid.
5graduating from chef school, I started working at the Hilton. Got paid $6 per hour before tax. (So, 4.50 nett) I worked 60 hours a week but only got paid for 40 hours.

90% of my classmates left the catering business after one year or less. I think that says enough.
User avatar
alan
Gold Member
Gold Member
Posts: 3062
Joined: Tue Sep 27, 2005 5:10 pm
Contact:

Re: Chef School

Postby alan » Tue Feb 25, 2014 9:56 am

calygirl wrote:sorry, don't know too much about the school, but I've been going to the restaurant since 2009 when it was still actually located in the school. Had some fantastic meals there over the years, but we went this week and very disappointed. It took them over 15 minutes to serve drinks, only one other table with diners. Then, they got one of the drink orders incorrect. They left out one of our appetizers. There were 3 of us, and two had to send their meals back. One dish (pecado sudado) had very little flavor) and the other dish (risotto) the rice wasn't cooked all the way. The best part of the meal were the desserts. It seems since they are now a real restaurant (Wallqa), the quality of the food has gone down. Too bad. Also, wasn't cheap, 200 soles for three drinks, one glass of wine, one appetizer, three main courses, and two desserts. Won't be back anytime soon.


I had much the same experience and feel the meals in the old "cafeteria" were better.. and just more fun because of the school feel. Does anyone know if that cafeteria is still open for lunch, or do they only have the "formal" restaurant?
User avatar
chi chi
Gold Member
Gold Member
Posts: 6060
Joined: Tue Dec 06, 2011 5:28 pm
Location: Granada, Andalusia

Re: Chef School

Postby chi chi » Tue Feb 25, 2014 12:31 pm

calygirl wrote:sorry, don't know too much about the school, but I've been going to the restaurant since 2009 when it was still actually located in the school. Had some fantastic meals there over the years, but we went this week and very disappointed. It took them over 15 minutes to serve drinks, only one other table with diners. Then, they got one of the drink orders incorrect. They left out one of our appetizers. There were 3 of us, and two had to send their meals back. One dish (pecado sudado) had very little flavor) and the other dish (risotto) the rice wasn't cooked all the way. The best part of the meal were the desserts. It seems since they are now a real restaurant (Wallqa), the quality of the food has gone down. Too bad. Also, wasn't cheap, 200 soles for three drinks, one glass of wine, one appetizer, three main courses, and two desserts. Won't be back anytime soon.


It think it's normal that goes wrong in a place run by a school. It's a school so the people that prepare and serve your meal are students who are learning the trade. That they still make mistakes is normal. They have to learn from their mistakes.

When I worked at the Hilton, she chef told us that making mistakes is the best way learn the job.
ironchefchris
Gold Member
Gold Member
Posts: 1642
Joined: Sun Oct 14, 2012 11:10 pm
Location: Arequipa

Re: Chef School

Postby ironchefchris » Tue Feb 25, 2014 4:42 pm

I think it depends on what one wants out of the experience. Some are looking only to expand their culinary skills or broaden their options as far as preparing personal meals while others are looking to explore a career as a chef.

I remember reading an article about the spike in enrollment at culinary institutes in the US, due in great part to the fairly recent popularity of Food Channel type cooking shows. The article stated that most graduates wind up working in restaurants for low wages and are saddled with debt. I don't know if that holds true here in Peru as well, though I'm guessing tuition is cheaper. Without the burden of student loans and debt, why not?

I'm glad I went and took a some courses as it broadened my knowledge, but like University, there is a big difference between school and the real, working world. Being a big time chef sounds like Hoolywood. Nobody should move to LA expecting that they're going to be a big movie star, but somebody is going to be the next big movie star.

Return to “Expat Conversations”

Login  •  Register