Lockdowns

This is the place for ON or Off topic conversations. Almost anything goes - but be kind, and no trolling.
Forum rules
While the rules in this forum are more relaxed than in other parts of the Expat site, there are still a few things we’d like you to remember: No name calling, no insults – be civil to each other!
69roadrunner
Gold Member
Gold Member
Posts: 384
Joined: Thu Aug 11, 2016 1:48 pm

Lockdowns

Postby 69roadrunner » Sat Mar 28, 2020 12:49 pm

Ah, the joys of locking down a country. Aren't they just wonderful?
https://www.theguardian.com/society/202 ... c-violence


User avatar
Alan
Gold Member
Gold Member
Posts: 2978
Joined: Tue Sep 27, 2005 5:10 pm
Contact:

Re: Lockdowns

Postby Alan » Sat Mar 28, 2020 2:37 pm

69roadrunner wrote:Ah, the joys of locking down a country. Aren't they just wonderful?
https://www.theguardian.com/society/202 ... c-violence



There must be all kinds of terrible human drama playing out at this very moment. Another fallout is that divorce may spike after the quarantine: https://www.businessinsider.com/covid-1 ... ies-2020-3
-----
"Hay que distanciarnos hoy para luego abrazarnos más fuerte".
-Guiseppe Conte, primer ministro italiano.
User avatar
windsportinperu
Gold Member
Gold Member
Posts: 1400
Joined: Tue May 18, 2010 3:11 pm

Re: Lockdowns

Postby windsportinperu » Sat Mar 28, 2020 3:30 pm

This Virus is putting to test not only to Countries but also to People who lives as families, friends , community in the same place..
noclevername
Gold Member
Gold Member
Posts: 84
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2020 3:09 pm

Re: Lockdowns

Postby noclevername » Thu Apr 30, 2020 10:44 am

Not exactly exclusive to lockdowns. More about history of the 1918 Pandemic. Some interesting parallels to today's situation. Will history repeat itself, or will we learn lessons from the past? There are more details if you click through to Tim Mak's Twitter thread (on which the article is based) which is in the article ::not sure how to add twitter stuff here on this forum::

https://sfist.com/2020/04/27/history-le ... ace-masks/
User avatar
Alan
Gold Member
Gold Member
Posts: 2978
Joined: Tue Sep 27, 2005 5:10 pm
Contact:

Re: Lockdowns

Postby Alan » Thu Apr 30, 2020 5:10 pm

That's really interesting. Thanks for sharing. I am going to start reading up on this time period, with particular interest to how society moved out of the pandemic.

You know, growing up in Canada, the big historic reference points for the past century were the colonization and settlement of the West, WW1, WW2 (including the internment of Canadians of Japanese descent) and the sinking of the Titanic (and other historical one-offs that captured peoples imagination). The Spanish influenza pandemic wasn´t part of the historic landscape at all... in fact, if you had asked most Canadians as late as last year, most would not have known that it had happened.

And that' s not to say the pandemic wasn't punishing - it was - killing 55,000 people in Canada -- most of whom were in the prime of their life.

To put this into perspective, 61,000 Canadians were killed overseas in the First World War, which was seen at the time as having been a tremendous sacrifice for such a young, small nation. In fact, WW1 was so transcendental that it became known as the moment Canada came of age and became a nation.

And yet - immediately after the war - in sweepes a pandemic that killed nearly as many people in less time. The response? Amnesia!

I find it really interesting that this pandemic didn't burn itself into the collective consciousness, but I take solace in that. It tells me that society at the time picked itself up afterwards, brushed off the dust and threw away the masks,then marched on without looking back over its shoulder.
-----
"Hay que distanciarnos hoy para luego abrazarnos más fuerte".
-Guiseppe Conte, primer ministro italiano.
noclevername
Gold Member
Gold Member
Posts: 84
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2020 3:09 pm

Re: Lockdowns

Postby noclevername » Thu Apr 30, 2020 7:15 pm

Pretty much the same reference points for me as well. The 1918 Pandemic is something I was always aware of, but really didn't know anything about. As a kid all the focus in history class was on the two world wars. Now we're at a point where there are more US casualties from this virus than there were during the entire Vietnam War, but for whatever reasons past wars become a larger part of a nations history. I too like the fact that when it was over people put it aside and just got back to living.

I wasn't really surprised to see that the resitance we now see has historical precedent. Don't understand the almost childish resistance to doing something as simple as wearing a mask if it's going to help prevent the contraction and spread of a deadly pandemic virus. Some people just don't like being told they have to do something. Not so much to protect them (though that's part of it) but to protect society at large.

I'm reading up on the same period of history but being American, more about the American response and years following. Herbert Hoover makes an interesting parallel to Trump. How failing to accept the reality of the situation at the time and his inability to deal with the Great Depression led to FDR and the New Deal. I'd like to see something similar. Instead of using taxpayer money by giving grants that don't have to be paid back to the airline industry and since interest rates are so low, I'd like to see them get loans instead. They can put up their fleets of planes as collateral. Instead of bailing out failing 19'th and 20'th century industries like oil/petroleum with free taxpayer funded grants, I'd rather see that money invested in newer, cleaner, greener technologies. This whole coronavirus situation is likely just a test run for something more pressing and long lasting, like the need in this decade to deal with the effects of climate change. If they're going to use massive amounts of taxpayer money to fund economic stimulus better to focus on the future instead of trying to save the past.

Return to “Expat Conversations”

Login  •  Register