Why Did You Retire in Peru?

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IntiPeque
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Why Did You Retire in Peru?

Postby IntiPeque » Wed Nov 18, 2020 11:31 am

As someone who is retired and considering moving to Peru (once things with COVID-19 settle down), I'd be interested in hearing from others who have made the leap and their reasons for doing so.
I have made several visits to Peru in the past, my last visit lasted 5 months but visiting is a much different animal than living as a permanent resident.


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Re: Why Did You Retire in Peru?

Postby billybob72 » Wed Nov 18, 2020 9:21 pm

I think a lot of the folks here have married a Peruvian and are now there. I am not retired yet but I am a citizen of the country so I know the question isn't aimed at me.

I have to say, I prefer Colombia as a place to live over Peru but I liked Lima a lot - loads of family there as well so that always helps!
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Re: Why Did You Retire in Peru?

Postby Alpineprince » Tue Nov 24, 2020 11:46 am

I retired to Peru 16 years ago. I married a beautiful Peruvian and we had two children together. Now, we will be moving back to the USA so my children can get the benefit of a better education and more career potential. It has been wonderful but most my expat friends have died or moved on. Wish you luck!
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Re: Why Did You Retire in Peru?

Postby 69roadrunner » Tue Nov 24, 2020 11:59 am

How ironic, you want to leave and can't, the o.p. wants to come and can't. Interesting times.
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Re: Why Did You Retire in Peru?

Postby IntiPeque » Tue Nov 24, 2020 12:41 pm

69roadrunner wrote:How ironic, you want to leave and can't, the o.p. wants to come and can't. Interesting times.



We're getting off topic but why would he not be able to leave? It looks like flights to certain cities in the US are up and running again. Depending on where he and his family land, there will likely be a 14 day quarantine required - certainly not the most convenient thing to have to undergo particularly with children but doable if there is family in the US to help.
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Re: Why Did You Retire in Peru?

Postby alan » Tue Nov 24, 2020 1:18 pm

Alpineprince wrote:I retired to Peru 16 years ago. I married a beautiful Peruvian and we had two children together. Now, we will be moving back to the USA so my children can get the benefit of a better education and more career potential. It has been wonderful but most my expat friends have died or moved on. Wish you luck!



I am very sorry to hear that. You have been a very valuable member of this community. If memory serves, we even sat down for a coffee way back in the day. I wish you well!
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Re: Why Did You Retire in Peru?

Postby samthesham » Tue Nov 24, 2020 2:59 pm

Some of the reasons to move there in retirement would be family connections, being a loner and living off the grid or running away from someone or something.
It could be a very cheap retirement if you live frugally maybe in a no frills barrio and eat menus.
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Re: Why Did You Retire in Peru?

Postby 69roadrunner » Wed Nov 25, 2020 10:46 am

Alpineprince wrote:Now, we will be moving back to the USA so my children can get the benefit of a better education and more career potential.



What's wrong with the schools in Peru? Many expats have put their kids through school in Peru, including Alan.
You might want to take a look around the US, I hear the schools are closed, especially in blue states.
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Re: Why Did You Retire in Peru?

Postby noclevername » Wed Nov 25, 2020 12:01 pm

Schools are closed here in Peru as well, so that comparison's a wash.

Maybe Alpine is looking at public school options? I don't know anyone here, expat or Peruano, who has their kids enrolled in public schools. As Alan mentioned recently, people will ask what school you have your child enrolled in as a way to gauge how much money you have. Obviously quality education is expensive here. Not all public schools in the US are of equal quality, but if you live in an area that values public education and eductaion in general (usually the so called Blue States) and has the tax base to cover the expense, children can get a very good education at a public school. If there are any public schools here with similar quality I'm not aware of them. Maybe Alpine is thinking long-term. Even though some schools may be closed at the moment, just like here in Peru, they'll be opening as soon as COVID is no longer an issue, if not sooner.

As far as higher education, I know several people here whose children attend universities in the US and Europe. Obviously I don't know any of the following people, but they (and their parents) found a US/European education to be advantageous: President Sagasti; Penn State and Wharton. PPK; Oxford. Alan Garcia; post-graduate studies in Spain. Keiko; Boston University and Columbia. Etc.
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Re: Why Did You Retire in Peru?

Postby alan » Wed Nov 25, 2020 2:30 pm

Assisted living situations are much more affordable here than in the States or Canada, and depending on your location and insurance, you can get decent, on-demand health care at a reasonable price. So much depends on the lifestyle you want to lead though, and whether or not you speak, or are willing to learn Spanish. The network that your spouse brings to the table is really important, too. Peru can be a great place to retire, or a terrible place to retire. Over the years, I've seen a lot of expats throw in the towel, but I think most would tell you that it was a great adventure while it lasted. So why not give it a try, but just don't burn any bridges.
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Re: Why Did You Retire in Peru?

Postby IntiPeque » Wed Nov 25, 2020 5:50 pm

alan wrote:Assisted living situations are much more affordable here than in the States or Canada, and depending on your location and insurance, you can get decent, on-demand health care at a reasonable price. So much depends on the lifestyle you want to lead though, and whether or not you speak, or are willing to learn Spanish. The network that your spouse brings to the table is really important, too. Peru can be a great place to retire, or a terrible place to retire. Over the years, I've seen a lot of expats throw in the towel, but I think most would tell you that it was a great adventure while it lasted. So why not give it a try, but just don't burn any bridges.

Well first of all, thanks for getting this thread back on topic :o !

I am single so there won't be a spousal network - it will be all on me to create my social network. I speak some Spanish (took classes in Arequipa on one of my longer visits and discovered the hard way how poorly my high school Spanish had endured over the decades). I am in the process of taking some online courses in order to make integration easier and that is going well, the rust is slowly coming off! I have a soft spot for the Sacred Valley but am concerned about how I would manage there if I lived as long as my parents (late 80s & 90's) so good to know that assisted living is available. I have a good pension & with social security on top of that, I could live quite well.
Currently I'm considering going through the Rentista visa process, hanging out for a couple of years just for the adventure aspect of it (if COVID has taught us anything it's to live life now and make the most of our opportunities ). Once the 2 years are up I can reevaluate - stay if things are working out or move back if they're not. It's actually a win - win but still easier said than done.
I started this thread to see what spurred others to make the leap but it looks like in most cases marriage was the primary reason.
Thanks for your input.
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Re: Why Did You Retire in Peru?

Postby billybob72 » Thu Nov 26, 2020 3:37 am

I am approaching 50 and am thinking a lot regards retirement - as a Peruvian citizen I can retire in Peru with no problems, however, my parents have recently suffered some very serious health setbacks that would probably cost a lot of money in Peru to take care of whereas in the UK (where they live at this moment in time...) they have the National Health Service to fall back on (and I thank The Universe for that everyday!)

I wouldn't mind retiring in Lima but I realise that retiring there and being solvent and happy is dependent on good health and good health services, my parents have both fell foul of serious, life threatening ailments despite never drinking or smoking in their life - the older you get, the more suspectible one seems to be to becoming seriously ill. It has given me a reality check regards this - it is OK to retire to Peru at 65 if you have your health but what happens down the line?

For me, Spain is winning out at the moment but I would love to buy a place in Lima and do six months in one place and six in the other - one can dream but what would stop me taking out full time retirement in Peru is failing health and the cost of health care - in Spain, it would be free for me (because I am eligible for fast track Spanish citizenship which I plan on getting...)
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Re: Why Did You Retire in Peru?

Postby 69roadrunner » Thu Nov 26, 2020 9:55 am

IntiPeque wrote:if COVID has taught us anything it's to live life now and make the most of our opportunities.

What covid has really taught us, one thing is for sure, where the goal post now sits, you can count on it being moved.
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Re: Why Did You Retire in Peru?

Postby noclevername » Thu Nov 26, 2020 10:06 am

billybob72 wrote:I am approaching 50 and am thinking a lot regards retirement - as a Peruvian citizen I can retire in Peru with no problems, however, my parents have recently suffered some very serious health setbacks that would probably cost a lot of money in Peru to take care of whereas in the UK (where they live at this moment in time...) they have the National Health Service to fall back on (and I thank The Universe for that everyday!)

I wouldn't mind retiring in Lima but I realise that retiring there and being solvent and happy is dependent on good health and good health services, my parents have both fell foul of serious, life threatening ailments despite never drinking or smoking in their life - the older you get, the more suspectible one seems to be to becoming seriously ill. It has given me a reality check regards this - it is OK to retire to Peru at 65 if you have your health but what happens down the line?

For me, Spain is winning out at the moment but I would love to buy a place in Lima and do six months in one place and six in the other - one can dream but what would stop me taking out full time retirement in Peru is failing health and the cost of health care - in Spain, it would be free for me (because I am eligible for fast track Spanish citizenship which I plan on getting...)

I've been thinking on the same track. Getting older, realizing that it's entirely possible that I'll have increased needs for healthcare in the coming years, and what that means if I'm in Peru when/if that starts to happen.

I'm not at the point where I can retire yet, but like you I've been thinking about Spain as a potential retirement spot. Until recently I've always been content with mere residency here, but now I'm thinking there are advantages to citizenship - such as eligibility for fast track Spanish citizenship should we decide to go that route. Not just for the health care aspect, but other reasons as well.

I've always been kind of surprised there aren't any (to my knowledge) more somewhat organized retirement communties for expats here in Peru, like Lake Chapala, San Miguel de Allende, and other places in Mexico (and other LatAm countries) that are filled with and almost cater to expats and where English is practically the second official language. Too far south compared to other countries for retiring N. Americans, too far in general for retiring Europeans?
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Re: Why Did You Retire in Peru?

Postby billybob72 » Thu Nov 26, 2020 10:53 pm

noclevername wrote:I've been thinking on the same track. Getting older, realizing that it's entirely possible that I'll have increased needs for healthcare in the coming years, and what that means if I'm in Peru when/if that starts to happen.

I'm not at the point where I can retire yet, but like you I've been thinking about Spain as a potential retirement spot. Until recently I've always been content with mere residency here, but now I'm thinking there are advantages to citizenship - such as eligibility for fast track Spanish citizenship should we decide to go that route. Not just for the health care aspect, but other reasons as well.

I've always been kind of surprised there aren't any (to my knowledge) more somewhat organized retirement communties for expats here in Peru, like Lake Chapala, San Miguel de Allende, and other places in Mexico (and other LatAm countries) that are filled with and almost cater to expats and where English is practically the second official language. Too far south compared to other countries for retiring N. Americans, too far in general for retiring Europeans?


It is a two year path to Spanish residency if you are a 'natural born' citizen (you need a birth certificate) of any Spanish speaking Latin American country, Portugal, Equatioral Guinea, Philippines and Puerto Rico - if you're naturalised you will have to wait ten years for citizenship like everyone else BUT if you have a Peruvian wife, she can get her citizenship in two years and the spouse can then apply after a year so that is nearly as quick as the two year pathway for citizens of the former Spanish Empire.

Peru certainly isn't making the most of it's coast (in my opinion) and its culinary tradition and Lima even, how many people I know skip in and out of Lima to go to Macchu Picchu and Cuzco which I think is a great shame, I think it would be great if Peru built a coastal city resort like Acapulco in Mexico and bumped up the flights to the country - not many carriers fly to Peru (especially from Europe) and it is shame really. I think Peru should do more to develop beach tourism in the country which would definitely attract northern Europeans - especially to get away from a harsh winter for some December-January sunshine.

Plenty of Europeans fly to Thailand in the winter months and of course Australia, Thailand is a 11 hour flight and Australia is a full day, so, if Peru developed beach tourism - the people would come - especially with the food and the guaranteed sunny weather of a southern hemisphere summer.
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Re: Why Did You Retire in Peru?

Postby noclevername » Fri Nov 27, 2020 8:14 pm

billybob72 wrote:
It is a two year path to Spanish residency if you are a 'natural born' citizen (you need a birth certificate) of any Spanish speaking Latin American country, Portugal, Equatioral Guinea, Philippines and Puerto Rico - if you're naturalised you will have to wait ten years for citizenship like everyone else BUT if you have a Peruvian wife, she can get her citizenship in two years and the spouse can then apply after a year so that is nearly as quick as the two year pathway for citizens of the former Spanish Empire.

Thanks for this information. My wife is Peruvian. Do you know if this means that even without Peruvian citizenship I could apply for Spanish citizenship the year after she obtains her citizenship, or do I need to be a naturalized citizen of Peru or another Spanish speaking Latin American country?

billybob72 wrote:
Peru certainly isn't making the most of it's coast (in my opinion) and its culinary tradition and Lima even, how many people I know skip in and out of Lima to go to Macchu Picchu and Cuzco which I think is a great shame, I think it would be great if Peru built a coastal city resort like Acapulco in Mexico and bumped up the flights to the country - not many carriers fly to Peru (especially from Europe) and it is shame really. I think Peru should do more to develop beach tourism in the country which would definitely attract northern Europeans - especially to get away from a harsh winter for some December-January sunshine.

Plenty of Europeans fly to Thailand in the winter months and of course Australia, Thailand is a 11 hour flight and Australia is a full day, so, if Peru developed beach tourism - the people would come - especially with the food and the guaranteed sunny weather of a southern hemisphere summer.

The Máncora area is probably the closest to resort like. I wonder if it's that there are other well known beaches on the continent and in C. America/Mexico that have been established for a while. Also greener, more stereotypical tropic like, not so desert like.

This place I believe is currently under construction. I don't know if they're targeting more permanent and seasonal residents as oppposed to to tourists.

https://marinacoastperu.com/
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Re: Why Did You Retire in Peru?

Postby billybob72 » Fri Nov 27, 2020 10:21 pm

noclevername wrote:Thanks for this information. My wife is Peruvian. Do you know if this means that even without Peruvian citizenship I could apply for Spanish citizenship the year after she obtains her citizenship, or do I need to be a naturalized citizen of Peru or another Spanish speaking Latin American country?


That's right, so once your wife has got her citizenship (and she will get it once you've established residence in Spain because it is a right bar a criminal record or some other hinderance...) she can sponsor you for citizenship and you will get it a year later, you have to pass exams on the constitution and a Spanish proficiency exam - DELE A2 - not massively difficult. You don't have to be a Peruvian citizen, the one year pathway is open to all who have married a Spaniard.

https://www.immigrationspain.es/en/citi ... -in-spain/

I am good via two routes, one is that I am a natural born Latin American citizen (I am lucky as up until very recently, I could have only become naturalised after two years living in Peru even though my mother is from Peru, they changed the law thankfully where I was eligible for 'natural born' status - for Mexicans born in The States, they can only become 'naturalised' Mexican citizens) and because I am Sephardic Jewish ancestry.


The Máncora area is probably the closest to resort like. I wonder if it's that there are other well known beaches on the continent and in C. America/Mexico that have been established for a while. Also greener, more stereotypical tropic like, not so desert like.

This place I believe is currently under construction. I don't know if they're targeting more permanent and seasonal residents as oppposed to to tourists.

https://marinacoastperu.com


Thanks for the link!

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