"You are Welcome" not frequently used in English ?

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windsportinperu
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"You are Welcome" not frequently used in English ?

Postby windsportinperu » Thu Nov 26, 2020 11:16 am

Hello,

I have a question

Most of us know that in Spanish the words "Gracias" and "De nada" are frequently used in written and spoken spanish . . . but . . .

I have noticed again and again , in English "You are welcome" is mostly not said back inmediately after "Thanks" ?


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Re: "You are Welcome" not frequently used in English ?

Postby 69roadrunner » Thu Nov 26, 2020 11:30 am

Can you give us an example? What do you mean by "not immediately"? That it is said, just not immediately?
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Re: "You are Welcome" not frequently used in English ?

Postby windsportinperu » Thu Nov 26, 2020 11:46 am

Juan says to Carlos "Gracias" (for any reason, as a way to be thanksful toward Carlos)

Carlos says back "De nada" (inmediately after the "Gracias" said by Juan)

P.S. I mean "De nada" seen to be used with more frequency than "You are welcome"
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Re: "You are Welcome" not frequently used in English ?

Postby 69roadrunner » Thu Nov 26, 2020 11:52 am

That's awfully demanding of Juan, remind me to avoid Juan. I may not immediately respond.
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Re: "You are Welcome" not frequently used in English ?

Postby noclevername » Thu Nov 26, 2020 12:04 pm

You're likely correct in your observation, windsport. Not every "thanks" gets a "you're welcome" in response, whereas most "gracias" get a "de nada." Thinking about it I find there's more variety in the response, perhaps depending on the circumstances. No response, you're welcome, sure, whatever, anytime, etc.

What's your question? That last sentence read more like an statement based on observation than a question.

If your quesion is "Why is that?" I'd say who knows? Maybe English speakers are less formal in their conversations and "you're welcome" may be seen as an unnessary formal response that is implied without needing to be spoken? Maybe it depends on the English speaker and some are more formal than others?
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Re: "You are Welcome" not frequently used in English ?

Postby alan » Thu Nov 26, 2020 12:11 pm

We gringos are getting less and less formal as time marches on, so maybe Windsport has a point. We just don't notice it the same way someone from another culture does. I can honestly say there are not many times I didn't receive a "your welcome" when I thought that it should have been offered.

Instead of a "your welcome" you can also hear "no problem" "no worries" "my pleasure" or a simple smile. Also, and this is weird, often a "your welcome" is replaced by another "thank you", like in the case of a transaction in a store.
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Re: "You are Welcome" not frequently used in English ?

Postby noclevername » Thu Nov 26, 2020 12:23 pm

No worries, my pleasure, etc. seem a lot closer to "de nada" than "you're welcome," which contextually doesn't really make much sense to me (though I'm sure there's a reason for the expression). You're welcome sounds better used as a start to an invitation. You're welcome to come in. You're welcome to try.

Whenever I thank someone I have no expectations of receiving a "you're welcome," or anything else, nor am I offended at all if there's a complete lack of response. If I'm doing the thanking there's a reason for that. The person doing whatever deserved thanks has already done their part, so I don't feel the need for them to give me anything else, like a "you're welcome."

I've also noticed that it's common to see parents instruct their young children to say "thank you" to someone but I never see parents require their children to respons "you're welcome" after they've been thanked.
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Re: "You are Welcome" not frequently used in English ?

Postby 69roadrunner » Thu Nov 26, 2020 12:37 pm

windsportinperu wrote:Juan says to Carlos "Gracias" (for any reason, as a way to be thanksful toward Carlos)

Carlos says back "De nada" (inmediately after the "Gracias" said by Juan)

P.S. I mean "De nada" seen to be used with more frequency than "You are welcome"

Actually I was looking for example of John or Carl not saying thank you, since your question was "I have noticed again and again , in English "You are welcome" is mostly not said back immediately after "Thanks" ?"
Do you have example of some English speaker not saying thank you immediately? That is my question.
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Re: "You are Welcome" not frequently used in English ?

Postby IntiPeque » Thu Nov 26, 2020 12:38 pm

69roadrunner wrote:That's awfully demanding of Juan


Not if it is the cultural norm to do so. In France "de rien" is the standard response as is "bitte" in Germany and I've experienced this as an immediate response in both countries - it's almost like a spoken period to end the conversation.

Alan makes a good point that "you're welcome" now has modern day variations like "my pleasure" or the aussie "no worries". I don't hear it as much as I used to in the US - maybe that's being less formal but it feels like an erosion of common courtesy to me.
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Re: "You are Welcome" not frequently used in English ?

Postby windsportinperu » Thu Nov 26, 2020 12:47 pm

Great Responses

I have always liked the simplicity of English as a Language for creating new words for new concepts or new technologies. Spanish does not have that flexibility

Formality is something that is ingrained in Spanish. We use "usted" and "ustedes" and all the conjugation of the verbs changes as well

It is not the same saying "Tu hablas Español ?" than saying ""Usted habla Español ?"

Even though it is dissapearing in our culture, it is still considered to have bad manners to talk to a old person as "tu" instead of "usted"(when the old person is an stranger)
Last edited by windsportinperu on Thu Nov 26, 2020 1:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: "You are Welcome" not frequently used in English ?

Postby samthesham » Thu Nov 26, 2020 12:48 pm

There's been many times that I've said gracias and never received a de nada.
Only thing I got was a blank stare.
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Re: "You are Welcome" not frequently used in English ?

Postby windsportinperu » Thu Nov 26, 2020 1:08 pm

Spanish also has its alternative words to "De nada" as "Fue un Gusto", "Un Placer", "Cuando Quieras" . . .

There are also some informal ways to say "Gracias" as " Chevere", "Bacan", "Te pasaste" . . . (among friends or in a casual conversation)
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Re: "You are Welcome" not frequently used in English ?

Postby 69roadrunner » Thu Nov 26, 2020 1:12 pm

IntiPeque wrote:
69roadrunner wrote:That's awfully demanding of Juan


Not if it is the cultural norm to do so. In France "de rien" is the standard response as is "bitte" in Germany and I've experienced this as an immediate response in both countries - it's almost like a spoken period to end the conversation.

Alan makes a good point that "you're welcome" now has modern day variations like "my pleasure" or the aussie "no worries". I don't hear it as much as I used to in the US - maybe that's being less formal but it feels like an erosion of common courtesy to me.

That's a nice lesson but neither windsportperu nor the rest of us are in France, Australia nor Germany.
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Re: "You are Welcome" not frequently used in English ?

Postby windsportinperu » Thu Nov 26, 2020 1:46 pm

IntiPeque wrote:
Not if it is the cultural norm to do so. In France "de rien" is the standard response as is "bitte" in Germany and I've experienced this as an immediate response in both countries - it's almost like a spoken period to end the conversation


Inti, I got your Point

I sometimes feel that something is missing when is not said back "De nada" or any other similar word
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Re: "You are Welcome" not frequently used in English ?

Postby 69roadrunner » Thu Nov 26, 2020 1:50 pm

But does it answer your question, "You are welcome not frequently used in English"?
Do you have an example?
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Re: "You are Welcome" not frequently used in English ?

Postby billybob72 » Thu Nov 26, 2020 10:44 pm

I am British

The reply of 'you're welcome' is seen as an Americanism. British people don't usually use this term but if they do, it is creeping into the British-English lexicon alongside other NA English words and phrases.

Most British people would see 'you're welcome' as unnecessary.
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Re: "You are Welcome" not frequently used in English ?

Postby IntiPeque » Thu Nov 26, 2020 11:08 pm

billybob72 wrote:I am British

The reply of 'you're welcome' is seen as an Americanism. British people don't usually use this term but if they do, it is creeping into the British-English lexicon alongside other NA English words and phrases.

Most British people would see 'you're welcome' as unnecessary.


Excellent point. Not all english speaking countries use this - when I first went to Australia in the early 90's I rarely heard "no worries" but now it is common place even outside of Australia.

So, windsportinperu, I wouldn't take it personally if people don't respond that way in english - it's just a cultural difference.
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Re: "You are Welcome" not frequently used in English ?

Postby IntiPeque » Thu Nov 26, 2020 11:18 pm

69roadrunner wrote:
IntiPeque wrote:
69roadrunner wrote:That's awfully demanding of Juan


Not if it is the cultural norm to do so. In France "de rien" is the standard response as is "bitte" in Germany and I've experienced this as an immediate response in both countries - it's almost like a spoken period to end the conversation.

Alan makes a good point that "you're welcome" now has modern day variations like "my pleasure" or the aussie "no worries". I don't hear it as much as I used to in the US - maybe that's being less formal but it feels like an erosion of common courtesy to me.

That's a nice lesson but neither windsportperu nor the rest of us are in France, Australia nor Germany.


The point (which you completely missed or simply ignored to indulge in troll like behavior) is that the convention of saying de nada or its linguistic equivalent is not "awfully demanding" but common in many civilized countries.
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Re: "You are Welcome" not frequently used in English ?

Postby billybob72 » Fri Nov 27, 2020 1:30 am

IntiPeque wrote:
69roadrunner wrote:
IntiPeque wrote:
69roadrunner wrote:That's awfully demanding of Juan


Not if it is the cultural norm to do so. In France "de rien" is the standard response as is "bitte" in Germany and I've experienced this as an immediate response in both countries - it's almost like a spoken period to end the conversation.

Alan makes a good point that "you're welcome" now has modern day variations like "my pleasure" or the aussie "no worries". I don't hear it as much as I used to in the US - maybe that's being less formal but it feels like an erosion of common courtesy to me.

That's a nice lesson but neither windsportperu nor the rest of us are in France, Australia nor Germany.


The point (which you completely missed or simply ignored to indulge in troll like behavior) is that the convention of saying de nada or its linguistic equivalent is not "awfully demanding" but common in many civilized countries.


It's funny you should mention it because 'no worries' is more common in British-English and that came from the Australian soap operas 'Neighbours' and 'Home and Away' if I am going to respond to a 'thank you' it will probably be with a 'no worries' like Crocodile Dundee :lol: (and of course, that film was probably the first time that phrase was introduced to the wider world...)
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Re: "You are Welcome" not frequently used in English ?

Postby alan » Fri Nov 27, 2020 8:44 am

billybob72 wrote:It's funny you should mention it because 'no worries' is more common in British-English and that came from the Australian soap operas 'Neighbours' and 'Home and Away' if I am going to respond to a 'thank you' it will probably be with a 'no worries' like Crocodile Dundee :lol: (and of course, that film was probably the first time that phrase was introduced to the wider world...)



Now that you mention it, I remember the expression entering Canada thanks to Crocodile Dundee. Ahhh.. the 80's.

"That's not a knife. Now, this is a knife". Pure gold for a teenager.
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Re: "You are Welcome" not frequently used in English ?

Postby 69roadrunner » Fri Nov 27, 2020 10:35 am

IntiPeque wrote:
69roadrunner wrote:That's awfully demanding of Juan


Not if it is the cultural norm to do so. In France "de rien" is the standard response as is "bitte" in Germany and I've experienced this as an immediate response in both countries - it's almost like a spoken period to end the conversation.

I said, That's a nice lesson but neither windsportperu nor the rest of us are in France, Australia nor Germany.

IntePique said, The point (which you completely missed or simply ignored to indulge in troll like behavior) is that the convention of saying de nada or its linguistic equivalent is not "awfully demanding" but common in many civilized countries.


Widsportoeru does not think it is common in civilized countries. I think you will find uncivilized countries to be more civil, but I digress.
Windsportperu does not think it is common or he would not have asked the question.

So, what point did I miss? I find, to expect a de nada or thank you, is rather self centered and demanding. Myself, I always say a thank you and a you are welcome but I would never expect neither.

I think you missed the point. I was talking to windsportperu, btw. He said "I have noticed again and again , in English "You are welcome" is mostly not said back immediately after "Thanks". To which I, simply, asked for an example.

He responded with his Spanish example. That did not answer my question because he said he noticed ENGLISH speakers not saying 'thank you' yet he answered with a Spanish example.

All I was asking for was an example of a ENGLISH speakers not saying thank you, "again and again", which is a rather generalized statement if not out right offensive, which I was, offended, being a speaker of the English variety.
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Re: "You are Welcome" not frequently used in English ?

Postby windsportinperu » Fri Nov 27, 2020 10:57 am

69roadrunner wrote:
All I was asking for was an example of a ENGLISH speakers not saying thank you, "again and again", which is a rather generalized statement if not out right offensive, which I was, offended, being a speaker of the English variety.


Come on man, Did you really understand that way ?

I never ever would say something like this, because it would be offensive

You are accusing me of something that I never said
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Re: "You are Welcome" not frequently used in English ?

Postby 69roadrunner » Fri Nov 27, 2020 11:06 am

Direct quote: "I have noticed again and again , in English "You are welcome" is mostly not said back inmediately after "Thanks" ?"
Are you changing it now?
viewtopic.php?f=33&t=32136&p=160881#p160856
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Re: "You are Welcome" not frequently used in English ?

Postby noclevername » Fri Nov 27, 2020 8:23 pm

I'm an American and I prefer 'no worries,' which happens to be a lot closer to 'de nada' than 'you're welcome' which when taken literally lacks any real meaning. 'No worries' or an equivalent, seems completely informal, whereas 'you're welcome' sounds like an automated formal response.
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Re: "You are Welcome" not frequently used in English ?

Postby billybob72 » Fri Nov 27, 2020 10:23 pm

alan wrote:
billybob72 wrote:It's funny you should mention it because 'no worries' is more common in British-English and that came from the Australian soap operas 'Neighbours' and 'Home and Away' if I am going to respond to a 'thank you' it will probably be with a 'no worries' like Crocodile Dundee :lol: (and of course, that film was probably the first time that phrase was introduced to the wider world...)



Now that you mention it, I remember the expression entering Canada thanks to Crocodile Dundee. Ahhh.. the 80's.

"That's not a knife. Now, this is a knife". Pure gold for a teenager.


It was! Some great films out in those days! :D

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