What's Missing?

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Re: What's Missing?

Postby T-cup » Thu Feb 21, 2013 9:14 am

TWIST = great place! Chi Chi is not exaggerating this time. The burgers are HUGE! I managed to eat half of one, it came with two patties. Really good! Also includes sides, one of them is a sweet potato salad Indian style which was delicious. Good onion rings.

The place is nice, super clean, and the owner, Jimmy, is friendly and solicitous. I will definitely go back. I paid 32 soles for the burger with sides, but two people could have eaten with this order. Great location, right on Miguel Grau. Worth going to!


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Re: What's Missing?

Postby caliguy » Thu Feb 21, 2013 9:24 am

T-cup wrote:TWIST = great place! Chi Chi is not exaggerating this time. The burgers are HUGE! I managed to eat half of one, it came with two patties. Really good! Also includes sides, one of them is a sweet potato salad Indian style which was delicious. Good onion rings.

The place is nice, super clean, and the owner, Jimmy, is friendly and solicitous. I will definitely go back. I paid 32 soles for the burger with sides, but two people could have eaten with this order. Great location, right on Miguel Grau. Worth going to!


Thank you T-Cup! i would also like to try this :D
every place has it's own spirit. you just need to tune into it.
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Re: What's Missing?

Postby love4coffee » Thu Feb 21, 2013 11:25 am

Comming from Florida and now living in Perú I´d have to say I miss my Arepas! I can´t find where to buy them or the corn flour to make the arepas at home. My favorite ones are the Venezuelan ones. My Venezuelan girlfriend would make them for me all the time, but now that I´m in Perú I can´t seem to find them anywhere. Can anyone help me? How could it be that we´re so close to Venezuela but no arepas. If anyone has any suggestion or now how or where to find them please get back to me.
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Re: What's Missing?

Postby victmanu » Thu Feb 21, 2013 5:44 pm

You can find colombian arepas in these places

•Café Colombia. Av. La Paz 646, Int. 19, Pasaje El Suche, Miraflores. Lima. Teléfonos: 243-0285. Fax: 241-8845. Celular: 999716754. RPM: #332501. RPC: 986648964.

•Cumbia & Café. República de Chile 596. Lima. 431-4759 / 2º Local en: Petit Thouars 1011, Santa Beatriz (Altura Alejandro Tirado). Teléfono: 2662789

•La Esquinita colombiana. 3460518 y la nueva dirección: Avenida del Aire 1322 Urb. Javier Prado Et. IV, distrito San Luis, Lima

•Pa’Barranquilla Café Bar: Rosa Toledo 411 Pueblo Libre espalda metro de Sucre.
4006354 – 6248084.


Panadería Pastelería "VILLA COLOMBIA"
Av Sucre 672 - Pueblo Libre, Frente a Edelnor, Lima, Peru
Teléfono 991 461 033
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Re: What's Missing?

Postby victmanu » Thu Feb 21, 2013 6:08 pm

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Re: What's Missing?

Postby victmanu » Thu Feb 21, 2013 6:14 pm

Thank you dh2012 for the information.
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Re: What's Missing?

Postby chi chi » Thu Feb 21, 2013 6:22 pm

Democratically priced ''all-you-can-eat'' buffets would be nice.
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Re: What's Missing?

Postby minos » Mon Feb 25, 2013 10:01 am

If I may, I venture to think that you could open a restaurant with any food from anywhere in the world, but you have to be proficient with that item. For example, the inventor of Inca Kola, your ability to learn and make your product and that is the key to success, as Bembos, etc. So I think you have to devote time to it.

Another second point, I think it is to the niche market, for example if you offer fast food delivery and not doing anything to be fast, it does not take a prophet to know that you will fail.

humbly, another point, if you explain to your customers that wine is offered Ica, or the cheese is of Cajamarca, or sausages are Huacho, or that Pisco Pisco is the same, people immediately associate your restaurant with all these offers of value

As lately many restaurants are opening, I also customer service improvement.

As for the myth that a dirty restaurant sells more in Lima, the only fair in this case is a fine

I particularly like the type of restaurant American, coming out in the movies, as it has ample free parking, clean bathrooms, panoramic moons, bar, chairs stuck together and comfortable, and the kitchen is there near the front . Something like that would be interesting in Peru. To see who is encouraged.!
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Re: What's Missing?

Postby alexisantonakis » Tue Oct 22, 2013 11:30 am

It has been very interesting reading this thread and have a couple of comments and questions if I may.

I realise this is an expat forum and primarily American, but I am a little surprised that people could classify chains, be them McYuckies or Chili's, as even being restaurants.
Would the average Peruvian really like to eat at those sort of places on a regular basis? Or is it more just because they are foreign or even American and they would just like to experience it once or twice?

I am British, although currently living in Canada, and am investigating the possibilty of opening a type of cafe in Lima purely to cater for the lunchtime trade, so would be located near lots of offices and would basically have a small menu, just half a dozen different items or so, but would be rustic or home cooked type of meals, for want of a better phrase.
Obviously there would have to be some Peruvian dishes, which I realise would be in direct competion to all the other cafes, but in addition there would be some English dishes as well...possibly upon the lines of 'pub grub'. But Pub Grub at it's best..and we have some incredible hidden dishes in England.

So I was just wondering how people might think of a sort of 'mixed' menu, and especially a smaller one, might go across with the customers.
I was most certainly not looking at being able to live off the proceeds from this venture, more to suppliment other sources of income. I know this is a difficult question to answer, but what sort of profit margins for a small cafe in Peru, might one expect?

Any advice would be most appreciated.

Gracias
Alexis
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Re: What's Missing?

Postby argidd » Thu Oct 24, 2013 11:22 am

alexisantonakis wrote:It has been very interesting reading this thread and have a couple of comments and questions if I may.

I realise this is an expat forum and primarily American, but I am a little surprised that people could classify chains, be them McYuckies or Chili's, as even being restaurants.
Would the average Peruvian really like to eat at those sort of places on a regular basis? Or is it more just because they are foreign or even American and they would just like to experience it once or twice?

I am British, although currently living in Canada, and am investigating the possibilty of opening a type of cafe in Lima purely to cater for the lunchtime trade, so would be located near lots of offices and would basically have a small menu, just half a dozen different items or so, but would be rustic or home cooked type of meals, for want of a better phrase.
Obviously there would have to be some Peruvian dishes, which I realise would be in direct competion to all the other cafes, but in addition there would be some English dishes as well...possibly upon the lines of 'pub grub'. But Pub Grub at it's best..and we have some incredible hidden dishes in England.

So I was just wondering how people might think of a sort of 'mixed' menu, and especially a smaller one, might go across with the customers.
I was most certainly not looking at being able to live off the proceeds from this venture, more to suppliment other sources of income. I know this is a difficult question to answer, but what sort of profit margins for a small cafe in Peru, might one expect?

Any advice would be most appreciated.

Gracias
Alexis


Hi Alexis

About the reception of British food in Peru... I'm not sure most dishes would be well received, especially for lunch places. For example, a shepperd's pie, or a jacket potato is far from what the average Peruvian considers lunch. Besides that, Peruvian food is very flavorful, and Peruvians consider British or similar foods are not.

Menus (that is what we call these lunch places, since they serve set menus) usually serve a first course (soup, typical Peruvian first courses, salads) a main meal (international but Peruvianized or Peruvian food). The main meal alway has rice unless it's got a pasta. Some offer dessert and some don't. Prices vary. The place I usually go to charges 20 soles (about 5 quid). If you eat there, you will get bread, first course, main meal and all you can drink chicha morada or any other home style juice/drink. I work in the financial district of Lima (San Isidro) in a busy área. There is another place, next door to my office, which I usually avoid, they serve the same for 13 soles, just no bread.

Anyway, that is my perspective, being Peruvian, married to a Brit, and having eaten and cooked British food. If you do pursue your idea, I think it is important to come to Lima first, remember property is very expensive, especially in the business districts, so you have to work out your rent is reasonable enough fo you to make money.

And let us know, because we'd love to drop by! :)
Regards,

Argidd
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Re: What's Missing?

Postby Hitoruna » Thu Oct 24, 2013 8:12 pm

two things to remember if opening a "lunch" place

1) Peruvians consider lunch the MAIN meal of the day. It is not just something to keep you until dinner

2) Rice IS NOT a side dish, but an indispensable part of a lunch. Sandwichs are not lunch. Any meal without rice is incomplete, just "half a dish" or "did you forget to put the other half" type of dish.

:wink:
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Re: What's Missing?

Postby panman » Fri Oct 25, 2013 12:19 am

Hitoruna wrote:two things to remember if opening a "lunch" place

1) Peruvians consider lunch the MAIN meal of the day. It is not just something to keep you until dinner

2) Rice IS NOT a side dish, but an indispensable part of a lunch. Sandwichs are not lunch. Any meal without rice is incomplete, just "half a dish" or "did you forget to put the other half" type of dish.

:wink:

I served a few home favorites to my wife, namely Shepherds pie and Hot Pot. On both occasions I was commended on the flavour, but told how much better it would have been with rice.
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Re: What's Missing?

Postby chi chi » Fri Oct 25, 2013 11:09 am

Hitoruna wrote:Rice IS NOT a side dish, but an indispensable part of a lunch. Sandwichs are not lunch. Any meal without rice is incomplete, just "half a dish" or "did you forget to put the other half" type of dish.

:wink:


I know a guy who was used to run a pizzeria in Tarapoto. He told me that often when he served a pizza, customers asked: ''where's the rice?'' :lol:
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Re: What's Missing?

Postby jackielu » Thu Oct 31, 2013 4:16 pm

I´m with the TexMex vote but I would also say good SOUTHERN FOOD. Chicken Fried Steak, Chicken Fried Chicken, Meatloaf, mashed potatoes and gravy, sweet potato casserole, green beans....oh! I´m getting hungry!!
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Re: What's Missing?

Postby chi chi » Thu Oct 31, 2013 7:30 pm

jackielu wrote:I´m with the TexMex vote but I would also say good SOUTHERN FOOD. Chicken Fried Steak, Chicken Fried Chicken, Meatloaf, mashed potatoes and gravy, sweet potato casserole, green beans....oh! I´m getting hungry!!


I am afraid that you will have to run to the supermarket or your local mercado and prepare that kind of food yourself at home. It's hard to find that food in Peru and if you find it, it's either too expensive or badly prepared.
I prepare a lot of Texmex and European food at home.

Meatballs filled with blue cheese, sweet tomato sauce and sauteed patatoes are my new invention.
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Re: What's Missing?

Postby KenBE » Fri Nov 01, 2013 3:01 pm

Hitoruna wrote:two things to remember if opening a "lunch" place

1) Peruvians consider lunch the MAIN meal of the day. It is not just something to keep you until dinner

2) Rice IS NOT a side dish, but an indispensable part of a lunch. Sandwichs are not lunch. Any meal without rice is incomplete, just "half a dish" or "did you forget to put the other half" type of dish.

:wink:

The strangest thing for me when I first came to Peru was: eating potatoes and rice together! Where I come from we eat either potatoes or rice, but never both of them. After a while I got used to it and even liked it, but it was very strange at first.
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Re: What's Missing?

Postby Hitoruna » Tue Nov 05, 2013 4:31 am

KenBE wrote:
Hitoruna wrote:two things to remember if opening a "lunch" place

1) Peruvians consider lunch the MAIN meal of the day. It is not just something to keep you until dinner

2) Rice IS NOT a side dish, but an indispensable part of a lunch. Sandwichs are not lunch. Any meal without rice is incomplete, just "half a dish" or "did you forget to put the other half" type of dish.

:wink:

The strangest thing for me when I first came to Peru was: eating potatoes and rice together! Where I come from we eat either potatoes or rice, but never both of them. After a while I got used to it and even liked it, but it was very strange at first.


that is because foreigners usually consider potatoes and rice two kinds of the same type of food. Something like "side dishes".
For us peruvians, rice is not a side dish, and so we considered it something very different as say potatoes.

Opposite to your surprise, I was very surprised to find people eating potatoes, meat, veggies etc without rice... It felt like only half of the dish. I mean, potatoes, meat, veggies all feel similar, and they "need" its compliment in a good portion of rice :wink:
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Re: What's Missing?

Postby chi chi » Tue Nov 05, 2013 11:08 am

Hitoruna wrote:that is because foreigners usually consider potatoes and rice two kinds of the same type of food. Something like "side dishes".
For us peruvians, rice is not a side dish, and so we considered it something very different as say potatoes.

Opposite to your surprise, I was very surprised to find people eating potatoes, meat, veggies etc without rice... It felt like only half of the dish. I mean, potatoes, meat, veggies all feel similar, and they "need" its compliment in a good portion of rice :wink:


Not only in Peru. In Ecuador they also put rice and potatoes on the same plate.
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Re: What's Missing?

Postby victmanu » Tue Nov 05, 2013 7:48 pm

Chinese food mix fried rice and noodles and mexicans mix tortillas and potatoes.
With the exception of mediterranean food most of the cuisines are heavy in carbhidrates.
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Re: What's Missing?

Postby argidd » Wed Nov 06, 2013 11:49 am

chi chi wrote:
Hitoruna wrote:that is because foreigners usually consider potatoes and rice two kinds of the same type of food. Something like "side dishes".
For us peruvians, rice is not a side dish, and so we considered it something very different as say potatoes.

Opposite to your surprise, I was very surprised to find people eating potatoes, meat, veggies etc without rice... It felt like only half of the dish. I mean, potatoes, meat, veggies all feel similar, and they "need" its compliment in a good portion of rice :wink:


Not only in Peru. In Ecuador they also put rice and potatoes on the same plate.


Yeah, but their food is nasty! :(
Regards,

Argidd
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Re: What's Missing?

Postby chi chi » Wed Nov 06, 2013 2:44 pm

argidd wrote:
chi chi wrote:
Hitoruna wrote:that is because foreigners usually consider potatoes and rice two kinds of the same type of food. Something like "side dishes".
For us peruvians, rice is not a side dish, and so we considered it something very different as say potatoes.

Opposite to your surprise, I was very surprised to find people eating potatoes, meat, veggies etc without rice... It felt like only half of the dish. I mean, potatoes, meat, veggies all feel similar, and they "need" its compliment in a good portion of rice :wink:


Not only in Peru. In Ecuador they also put rice and potatoes on the same plate.


Yeah, but their food is nasty! :(


My personal experience is that Ecuadorian food is nicer but off course everybody has a different taste.
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Re: What's Missing?

Postby Hitoruna » Fri Nov 08, 2013 3:31 am

Goin back to the original post, I think what is missing is good thai or vietnamese...(well ok, maybe more Thai :D ) food. I have heard of only one place and dont know if it is good...

Being a big fan of thai food, I would like to take my parents there... :)
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Re: What's Missing?

Postby argidd » Fri Nov 08, 2013 10:17 am

Hito

The Thai place is in Chacarilla, it is called Siam. It is VERY good, although I cannot judge how close to authentic thai it actually is.

I agree, we are missing a lot of Asian, that are not Chinese or Jap, or better said... Chifa and comida nikkei.
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Argidd
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Re: What's Missing?

Postby KenBE » Fri Nov 08, 2013 12:40 pm

argidd wrote:
chi chi wrote:
Hitoruna wrote:that is because foreigners usually consider potatoes and rice two kinds of the same type of food. Something like "side dishes".
For us peruvians, rice is not a side dish, and so we considered it something very different as say potatoes.

Opposite to your surprise, I was very surprised to find people eating potatoes, meat, veggies etc without rice... It felt like only half of the dish. I mean, potatoes, meat, veggies all feel similar, and they "need" its compliment in a good portion of rice :wink:


Not only in Peru. In Ecuador they also put rice and potatoes on the same plate.


Yeah, but their food is nasty! :(


To me, Ecuadorian food is ok, but not as good as Peruvian. Their "ceviche" is more like a soup and should really have a different name.
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Re: What's Missing?

Postby victmanu » Fri Nov 08, 2013 7:07 pm

KenBE wrote:
argidd wrote:
chi chi wrote:
Hitoruna wrote:that is because foreigners usually consider potatoes and rice two kinds of the same type of food. Something like "side dishes".
For us peruvians, rice is not a side dish, and so we considered it something very different as say potatoes.

Opposite to your surprise, I was very surprised to find people eating potatoes, meat, veggies etc without rice... It felt like only half of the dish. I mean, potatoes, meat, veggies all feel similar, and they "need" its compliment in a good portion of rice :wink:


Not only in Peru. In Ecuador they also put rice and potatoes on the same plate.


Yeah, but their food is nasty! :(


To me, Ecuadorian food is ok, but not as good as Peruvian. Their "ceviche" is more like a soup and should really have a different name.


Their cebiche is not only a soup also has ketchup in it and pop corn as a side dish.
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Re: What's Missing?

Postby victmanu » Fri Nov 08, 2013 7:15 pm

argidd wrote:Hito

The Thai place is in Chacarilla, it is called Siam. It is VERY good, although I cannot judge how close to authentic thai it actually is.

I agree, we are missing a lot of Asian, that are not Chinese or Jap, or better said... Chifa and comida nikkei.

Jap is offensive is like calling pakis to pakistanis or chins to chinese people or peruchos to peruvians.

Cajun food and jamaican will be nice and more indian and chinese options.
Greek food and lebanese too.
Also more italian options than the common pizza, pasta and antipasto.
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Re: What's Missing?

Postby SilverbackPeru » Thu Nov 14, 2013 7:53 pm

Hitoruna wrote:
KenBE wrote:
Hitoruna wrote:two things to remember if opening a "lunch" place

1) Peruvians consider lunch the MAIN meal of the day. It is not just something to keep you until dinner

2) Rice IS NOT a side dish, but an indispensable part of a lunch. Sandwichs are not lunch. Any meal without rice is incomplete, just "half a dish" or "did you forget to put the other half" type of dish.

:wink:

The strangest thing for me when I first came to Peru was: eating potatoes and rice together! Where I come from we eat either potatoes or rice, but never both of them. After a while I got used to it and even liked it, but it was very strange at first.


that is because foreigners usually consider potatoes and rice two kinds of the same type of food. Something like "side dishes".
For us peruvians, rice is not a side dish, and so we considered it something very different as say potatoes.

Opposite to your surprise, I was very surprised to find people eating potatoes, meat, veggies etc without rice... It felt like only half of the dish. I mean, potatoes, meat, veggies all feel similar, and they "need" its compliment in a good portion of rice :wink:


I think this sumed up why i struggle with food here in Peru. I'm not saying the food is bad, i just get sick to death of the same type of food day in day out which is boiled rice with a side plate of boiled chicken.

I guess my reply to the original post of what's missing in Peru.........variety!
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Re: What's Missing?

Postby SilverbackPeru » Thu Nov 14, 2013 8:06 pm

Eating rice and potatos isn't too great either, that's 2 forms of carbohydates together. I hate it when i get meals at the in laws and it's a dish of rice and potatos with no vegetables and little or no meat, and then they think it's a healthy balanced diet WTF!
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Re: What's Missing?

Postby victmanu » Thu Nov 14, 2013 8:50 pm

SilverbackPeru wrote:Eating rice and potatos isn't too great either, that's 2 forms of carbohydates together. I hate it when i get meals at the in laws and it's a dish of rice and potatos with no vegetables and little or no meat, and then they think it's a healthy balanced diet WTF!


To say that peruvian food is only Rice and potatoes is just a simplification. Like saying mexican food is only tacos, or british food is only fish and chips or american food is only hamburgers.
I am sure your in laws have not time to cook something different than rice and potatoes and boiled chicken. Or maybe that diet was prescribed to them for a nutrinionist to lower their cholesterol or something like that.
Peruvian seafood dishes are diverse, sudados, escabeches, tiraditos, chupes, cebiches, etc.
A lot of soups, plates with beef , plates with goat, plates with duck, plates with cuy, and worms also :D , many salads and appetizers like ensalada de pallares or solterito de habas and queso, rocoto relleno, palta rellena, pastel de choclo , I am sure we need variety but peruvian food is not only rice, potatoes and boiled chicken.
Last edited by victmanu on Mon Nov 18, 2013 8:03 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: What's Missing?

Postby caliguy » Thu Nov 14, 2013 9:30 pm

SilverbackPeru wrote:Eating rice and potatos isn't too great either, that's 2 forms of carbohydates together. I hate it when i get meals at the in laws and it's a dish of rice and potatos with no vegetables and little or no meat, and then they think it's a healthy balanced diet WTF!

lol! we must have the same relatives! i got tired of the starchy sides as well, and take the run of the kitchen when in Peru. also got a fridge full of condiments: tabasco, worcestershire, bbq sauce, mayo, mustard, ketchup etc, etc... :lol:
every place has it's own spirit. you just need to tune into it.
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Re: What's Missing?

Postby SilverbackPeru » Thu Nov 14, 2013 9:41 pm

I know Peruvian food isn't just boiled rice, potatoes and chicken but it just feels as tho it is most of the time! and it is a very heavy carb based diet which isn't healthy at all.

The 8 years or more ithat i've came to Peru this has all my in laws have ever cooked. I don't think i've ever had roasted food come to think about it other than Pardos or the odd wedge in Peru. In the house it is always boiled white rice, boiled white potato and boiled chicken in some boiled sauce.

There's so many things you can do with potatos but it always ends up being sliced and boiled and everything, EVERYTHING!!! comes with boiled rice! and because of that standard template for how dishes are created in Peru i end up really missing variety in food! i miss the roasts, the grills, the fry ups, the salads, the toasted and the baked!
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Re: What's Missing?

Postby SilverbackPeru » Thu Nov 14, 2013 9:50 pm

i would kill for some sort of grilled meat in bread! Luchos is really nice by Parque Kennedy but this type of food never works out at good value for money. Things like giant french bread baquettes packed with seafood, a choice of sausage other than hotdogs, dumplings, yorkshire puddings or things along those line as a side dish as well!

You do have to love the peruvian chili salsa dips however!
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Re: What's Missing?

Postby victmanu » Sat Nov 16, 2013 6:44 pm

SilverbackPeru wrote:i would kill for some sort of grilled meat in bread! Luchos is really nice by Parque Kennedy but this type of food never works out at good value for money. Things like giant french bread baquettes packed with seafood, a choice of sausage other than hotdogs, dumplings, yorkshire puddings or things along those line as a side dish as well!

You do have to love the peruvian chili salsa dips however!


You can find Mayonese, ketchup. mustard, golf sauce, tartar sauce and soy sauce in every supermarket of Lima, also dijon mustard, tabasco chili. chimichurri and worcester sauce are sold at the supermarkets.
Blood puddings, hot dogs and sausages or chorizos are easy to find. If your in laws use to boil potaoes You can drop a couple to the fry pan and do papas doradas. I use to do arroz a la jardinera adding carrots cut in squares, corn grains and green peas and a bit of butter.
Peruvians use to do some stuff with potatoes, for example papas rellenas, causa limeña and causa norteña, papas fritas, papas doradas, papas with huancaina sauce and papas with ocopa sauce, pastel de papa with melted cheese as a side dish of rocoto relleno, pastel de papas in the oven with mozzarella cheese, cream and ham, use to drop potatoes and sweet potatoes to the pachamanca, ,ashed potatoes, mashed potatoes with spinach and a lot of french frieds, for example salchipapas, choripapas, pollo a la brasa con papas fritas , etc.
I do not understand what stop You to grill a piece of beef. There is not science to do it and does not take more than 5 minutes.
Last edited by victmanu on Mon Nov 18, 2013 8:07 am, edited 3 times in total.
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chi chi
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Re: What's Missing?

Postby chi chi » Sun Nov 17, 2013 12:55 pm

victmanu wrote:You can find Mayonese, ketchup. mustard, golf sauce, tartar sauce and soy sauce in every supermarket of Lima, also dijon mustard, tabasco chili and worcester sauce are sold at the supermarkets.
Blood puddings, hot dogs and sausages or chorizos are easy to find.


MAKRO has a big selection of those things and at democratic prices.
Hitoruna
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Re: What's Missing?

Postby Hitoruna » Mon Nov 18, 2013 9:13 pm

SilverbackPeru wrote:
I think this sumed up why i struggle with food here in Peru. I'm not saying the food is bad, i just get sick to death of the same type of food day in day out which is boiled rice with a side plate of boiled chicken.

I guess my reply to the original post of what's missing in Peru.........variety!


Are you a relative of mine? :lol: :roll:

I read your post, and I think the problem is your family. You see, my family has had this talk about "nutrition" and "healthy food" (more or less like you that thinks about carbohidrates while eating your potatoes lol :mrgreen: ) and now they just cook the same darn boiled chicken every day. When I remember all the tasty things I ate as a child I curse the "eat healthy" movement that brainwash our minds :evil:

Anyway, like you have been told, we have much more than that. It is actually funny to complain about variety when variety is the hallmark (or the main characteristic) of our cuisine. :mrgreen:

And believe me, if you complain about lack of salsas, you should be where I live. The same old black "sauce" for everything. I miss our variety

Of course all this talk is white rice aside. As I said white rice is a world apart. variety does not mean holding the rice, because we breath rice :mrgreen:
Hitoruna
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Re: What's Missing?

Postby Hitoruna » Tue Nov 19, 2013 12:49 am

argidd wrote:Hito

The Thai place is in Chacarilla, it is called Siam. It is VERY good, although I cannot judge how close to authentic thai it actually is.

I agree, we are missing a lot of Asian, that are not Chinese or Jap, or better said... Chifa and comida nikkei.


Argidd thanks!
I ve heard about Siam. checked their homepage last time, and though seems good and dont want to be stingy it called my attention that they dont put prices in their menu. Very fishy :| Have you been there? How much should I expect per person in average?

Anyway, if they do a decent Tom Yan Kun I will be satisfied :mrgreen: Having a thai restaurant one block from my house here I would love to share this fun with my folks too :)
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Re: What's Missing?

Postby Capis Coffee » Fri Dec 13, 2013 7:22 pm

alexisantonakis wrote:So I was just wondering how people might think of a sort of 'mixed' menu, and especially a smaller one, might go across with the customers.
I was most certainly not looking at being able to live off the proceeds from this venture, more to suppliment other sources of income. I know this is a difficult question to answer, but what sort of profit margins for a small cafe in Peru, might one expect?

Any advice would be most appreciated.

Gracias
Alexis



I think it would be wise to do for example a Thai-Peruvian fusion restaurant. That could show case some real thai food dishes, as well as some fused with Peruvian flavor, and stilll allowing you to offer some traditional Peruvian dishes that would keep the local/regulars coming in. Key also being, offering meals for $7-10 soles but not more then $12.

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